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Critique my technique...

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Critique my technique...

Old 02-07-06, 02:40 PM
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ecpike
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Critique my technique...

The XC trails that I ride on are rocky and at some places very small singletrack on the turns, etc. So I find myself putting my foot down a lot to get up and over things (this is when climbing) and I used toe clips, but ended up only keeping one foot in the clip and the other pedal flipped upside down (until the toe clip was snapped off) so that it would be easier to get my foot off of the pedal to keep myself up.. Now the question, I'm thinking about getting new pedals and possibly going clipless, or just going back to toe clips, what should I do? I have no experience with clipless so would those be feasible for my riding style? And how would I deal with getting my feet in and out, are platform clipless pedals OK for keeping one foot uncliped? Give me some opinions if you would, Thanks!
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Old 02-07-06, 02:57 PM
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Clipless is the way to go for most XC riding. Once you get used to them, it's easy to get your foot off the pedal when you need it and clicked back in.
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Old 02-07-06, 04:37 PM
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I'm not sure if putting a foot down a lot is a 'style' per se, but I think you will find clipless to be much easier to get your foot out of. Like probably everyone else, I started with toe-clips and once I made the switch I'll never go back. They're better in every respect, besides, you're eventually going to snap one of those straps on a tough climb and have a nasty fall. For what it's worth, my first clipless mtb pedals were some Performance SPD knock-offs and they performed just as good as the top of the line shimano SPD's that I have on my race bike now.
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Old 02-07-06, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by C4Byke
I think you will find clipless to be much easier to get your foot out of.
I agree 100%
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Old 02-07-06, 05:14 PM
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There'll be a learning curve, but clipless is the way to go. Less chance of a strap snagging a root or something, much easier to get into and out of after you've gotten used to them, more efficient, etc.
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Old 02-07-06, 05:23 PM
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Putting your foot down is called "dabbing". I would first try clipless. Get used to them by practicing on grass first. Once you're set to go, work on line selection and pedaling techniques. One of my tricks (I'm sure many others do it too) is that if I know that I cannot do a full pedal rev without hitting something, I'll do a half rev motion as many times as I need. I call it "ratcheting", but you can call it what you will. Try to pick an unobstructed line up the hill, and be smooth in power delivery. Lift the wheel up and over to keep momentum, and use a slightly harder gear than a normal climbing gear to keep the torque up and smooth.
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Old 02-07-06, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by trekkie820
Putting your foot down is called "dabbing". I would first try clipless. Get used to them by practicing on grass first. Once you're set to go, work on line selection and pedaling techniques. One of my tricks (I'm sure many others do it too) is that if I know that I cannot do a full pedal rev without hitting something, I'll do a half rev motion as many times as I need. I call it "ratcheting", but you can call it what you will. Try to pick an unobstructed line up the hill, and be smooth in power delivery. Lift the wheel up and over to keep momentum, and use a slightly harder gear than a normal climbing gear to keep the torque up and smooth.
+1 This is what I was going to say. Although technically a higher/harder gear produces less torque, which reduces your chance of breaking traction and spinning your rear wheel.
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Old 02-09-06, 12:45 AM
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On the topic of technique....

I can't speak for toe clips, as I've never tried them. But I do find that a properly adjusted clipless setup can really put a polish on your spinning skills, clipped in or no.

But there's alot to be said for flat pedals, too. Not like the bases of your toe clip pedals, but a real nasy pegged platform. You learn alot , again, about spinning. But you also learn alot about how to touch your pedals and handle the rear end of your bike. And when you don't learn, you bleed from the shins, which is actually really cool. Imagine, you could roll up to Starbucks after the ride with blood dribbling down into your sock. They chicks will dig it and your ears will be rigning from the pain. (This happen to anyone else? The ringing? Seriously?)

In all seriosuness, consider a good pair of flats.
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Old 02-09-06, 04:57 PM
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I really dig my eggbeater mallet pedals. i've been riding clipless for years, but if i need to dab, sometimes i don't clip back in soon enough. foot rockets off pedal. shin bleeds. ears ring from the pain (not really)...

the mallets give me the best of both worlds, i can unclip if i need, but still have a lot of pedal to press on. this has been really helpful when starting from standstill into a tricky area and trying to clip in while pedalling - i haven't slipped off the platform yet. i can clip in from front back or top - i really think i've got foot ld when it comes to clipping in - more easily than with straight eggbeaters and worlds easier than spds.

just my 02
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Old 02-09-06, 05:12 PM
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I used clips and straps for a while, so I completely understand the shin-bleed thing. I occasionally miss on my SPD's, but I don't bleed as much - my shins are pretty much all avascular scar tissue. Besides, all you need to do is rub some dirt in the wound and the bleeding will stop pretty damn quickly.
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Old 02-10-06, 09:01 AM
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Funny you say that...I was riding an 18 mile ride once, fell in the first miles of it and gashed my knee on a rock. At the end of the ride, it was already mildly infected. When I got home, it was a nice puffy, puss filled line across my knee.
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