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How do I prevent my front wheel from coming up off the ground when riding hills?

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How do I prevent my front wheel from coming up off the ground when riding hills?

Old 06-04-06, 06:39 PM
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Petanca
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How do I prevent my front wheel from coming up off the ground when riding hills?

I can't seem to ride the very steep hills because when I get to the steep parts I seem to start pulling up on the handle bars on every down stroke of the pedals in order to apply more power to the pedals thus causing the front wheel to lift up. If I don't pull up on the bars I cant apply enough power... Are you supposed to pull up on the handle bars on very steep sections?
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Old 06-04-06, 06:41 PM
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Try putting it in a lower gear, this will prevent you needing to 'push' harder and pull up sometimes.
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Old 06-04-06, 06:44 PM
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Maybe you could also try leaning forwards more...maybe putting your seat up could help?

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Old 06-04-06, 06:44 PM
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move your weight forward when you are going up hills if you are sitting ot standing

if you are sitting, try and lean a little on the bars to keep the front bitting. i would have no clue how you can pull the wheel up when you are standing. a lower gear should help also.
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Old 06-04-06, 06:48 PM
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Ive found that sitting as far forward on the seat as possible helps a lot on short but steep climbs, especially those that transition back to a quick descent. I cant climb while standing worth a hoot. I always seem to hit the wrong gear or pedal bob the crap out of the front end so I learned to stay seated as much as possible and only come off the saddle on climbs when exhaustedly tired.
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Old 06-04-06, 06:50 PM
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It'll depend upon your riding style, the slope of the hill, and the terrain.

Maybe you should find a hill you have trouble with and practice different ways up 'er. Seating or standing, big gears or low, etc.
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Old 06-04-06, 06:53 PM
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Alright, thanks. I'll try some of the techniques, next weekend.
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Old 06-04-06, 07:05 PM
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This is going to sound funny, but....When climbing i consciously think about pushing down on the bar while mashing with my legs.

Pulling excessively on the bar says to me that your legs need some upper body assistance required to create the necessary torque to spin the cranks. I think as your legs get stronger, they will need this upper body assistance less and less.
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Old 06-04-06, 07:32 PM
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If a track is steep and gravely I oftten find it best to lean BACK to prevent the rear wheel spinning too much (by causing more force between the ground and the back wheel and thus greater traction). This of course leads to a greater tendency for the front wheel to lift off the ground, but I have gone up some quite steep gravely slopes this way which I don't think I could have if I was leaning forward, and I don't particularly recall any problems with the front wheel lifting off the ground. I am not dissagreeing with what other people have said about leaning forward, just adding another dimension.
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Old 06-04-06, 07:46 PM
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The wheel is lifting for two reasons...you are pulling hard to help generate the torque you need to power up the hill, and your weight is shifted to the back of the bike due to the upward slope of the hill.
To avoid the need for so much torque, use your lowest gears. Also, pick up speed before the steep part and try to let that carry you up.
To address the rear weighting, get as far forward as possible, keep your head low, and use bullhorns if you have them. Don't raise your seat as another poster suggested...that moves your weight back and increases the chance of a wheelie.
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Old 06-04-06, 07:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Flak
Pulling excessively on the bar says to me that your legs need some upper body assistance required to create the necessary torque to spin the cranks. I think as your legs get stronger, they will need this upper body assistance less and less.
I don't think it's leg strength. If you applied the same leg power in the same posture without pulling up on the bars as you do when you pull up, you'd basically just lift your body. What I think you are probably doing is leaning farther forward so you have your upper body weight above or even in front of your feet. and that is allowing you to apply the powerful downstroke with your feet without pulling up.
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Old 06-04-06, 07:54 PM
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Maybe.
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Old 06-04-06, 07:59 PM
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So I should try leaning forward?
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Old 06-04-06, 08:13 PM
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Either that or kind of bounce your front wheel up short steep ones, which im sure we've all done before.
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Old 06-04-06, 08:18 PM
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Alright Thank You
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Old 06-04-06, 08:24 PM
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I started to do hills (rocky, sometimes loose) better when I learned NOT to be in the seat. Think of the seat as a point of reference - and move around - try not to be on it much. Keep shifting your weight forward, back to balance between traction in the back, and keeping the front tire on the ground. Once you start moving your body more, you will be amazed what you can go up.

The other thing I like to do is attack a rise - I keep it is a fairly high gear as I approach the hill and pedal, as it gets hard, I lean forward and really smash the pedals. Works really well on shorter hills.

Being off the seat is really important as you go down hills too. Move your rear over the rear tire and it is amazing what you can go down.

But, if your legs are strong now - they will be soon!

Your rear-end feel better the next day too.

just my dos colones
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Old 06-05-06, 12:14 AM
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i have found the best way to climb hills (especially very steep ones) is to drop it in a low gear and spin away while staying in the saddle. Lean forward and pull the handlebars toward you (as opposed to up) while you're pedaling.

Standing works too for less steep inclines, but you might lose some rear wheel traction while climbing.
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Old 06-05-06, 12:19 AM
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well my way is like this, if you dont want to lift up your wheel you could either pedal up as fast as possible or put your weight towards the front or stand up and push your self forward. Thats my method ^^ It takes time go get used to through
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Old 06-05-06, 12:23 AM
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They're not sexy, but this is why they invented bar ends.
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Old 06-05-06, 12:34 AM
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yeah and bar ends also help you in climbing, you can put your weight over the bars easier ^^
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Old 06-05-06, 01:14 AM
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gear your weight forward
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Old 06-05-06, 02:34 AM
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Trouble with standing is that it is easy to spin the rear wheel (and not have any traction).

Originally Posted by crtreedude
I started to do hills (rocky, sometimes loose) better when I learned NOT to be in the seat. Think of the seat as a point of reference - and move around - try not to be on it much. Keep shifting your weight forward, back to balance between traction in the back, and keeping the front tire on the ground. Once you start moving your body more, you will be amazed what you can go up.

The other thing I like to do is attack a rise - I keep it is a fairly high gear as I approach the hill and pedal, as it gets hard, I lean forward and really smash the pedals. Works really well on shorter hills.

Being off the seat is really important as you go down hills too. Move your rear over the rear tire and it is amazing what you can go down.

But, if your legs are strong now - they will be soon!

Your rear-end feel better the next day too.

just my dos colones
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Old 06-05-06, 03:04 AM
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Yes i only resort to standing if i am really tired, or the climb is so steep i can't keep speed up sitting in the saddel so i need to stand to get that extra 'push'.
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Old 06-05-06, 05:32 AM
  #24  
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If the climb is long and smooth , you should stay seated .When the front wheel starts to get light, shift your weight forward on the saddle and lean your torso closer to the handlebars. If you are on a very long climb , more than a couple of miles , shift into a harder gear (to prevent wheel-slip)and stand up on the pedals. This will allow you to stretch your legs and back muscles .
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Old 06-05-06, 05:39 AM
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Try lowering the bars to a classic XC riding position, about 3" below the saddle.
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