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I'm 6'2", do I need a large or ex-large frame?

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I'm 6'2", do I need a large or ex-large frame?

Old 10-26-06, 07:42 AM
  #1  
qwerty11
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I'm 6'2", do I need a large or ex-large frame?

What do you guys think?
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Old 10-26-06, 07:51 AM
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from my recent sizing issues with frames for a build, my input is to go check out sizes at a lbs. From all the research I did plus sizing calc's from the web said I needed an 18" frame (I'm 5'9"). After checking out several bikes at an lbs + ordering a 18" frame - I'll be riding a 16" frame.

I guess my point is sizing tables and everyone can tell you what size, but you need to get on one and make sure its right. For me the 18" was certainly ridable, but there was no standover room to save the jewels - so I'm much happier with a 16". The biggest I've seen is a 22" so that maybe where you start test fitting.
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Old 10-26-06, 08:14 AM
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im gonna say you're right on the line. I'm 6-4, so i need the biggest size in everything (sometimes they dont come big enough). Someone your height is on the edge of sizes, and they're all different from company to company. as mentioned, go to a LBS and sit on as much as you can - its the only real way to know
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Old 10-26-06, 08:45 AM
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go try some bikes. that's the only way to know.
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Old 10-26-06, 08:46 AM
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it's not that simple...the most critical measurement is the top tube length and head tube length, and every mfg does their own thing

my 17" (med) FS MTB is HUGE when compared to my 21" hybrid and my 19" hardtail, but then my 20" hybrid is bigger than my 21"...my 19" hybrid is way too small. I also have a 21" rigid MTB that's tiny

The only way to know is to get a bike under you
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Old 10-26-06, 08:48 AM
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just sitting on bikes is not going to do you any good. I mean, its better than guessing, but its definitely not good enough to make a good decision. So, if possible test ride a few bikes. Possibly different sizes, makes and models. this will give you a good idea.

I would like to share one of my recent experiences. I was test riding a Gary Fisher Tass and a Trek (can not remember the model name), while sitting on the bike at the bike shop the Trek felt more comfortable. and the Tass's long top tube made me stretch too much. But, when I took them out for test rides - the Tass felt much better (in climbing, turning, energy transfer etc.) than the Trek. Also, things like Stem, handlebar, length of the crank arm, angles of the seat and head tube are important consideration. but, over all test riding is by far the best way to decide about a bike. It would be ideal if you could test ride the bike in the kind of condition you would be using it in, but I have not found a bike shop who would let me take a bike for test riding in real trails. Although, you can borrow your friends bike and test it on your preferred trails, if your friends happen to own the brand/model you want.

good luck.
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Old 10-26-06, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by sherpaPeak
just sitting on bikes is not going to do you any good. I mean, its better than guessing, but its definitely not good enough to make a good decision. So, if possible test ride a few bikes. Possibly different sizes, makes and models. this will give you a good idea.

I would like to share one of my recent experiences. I was test riding a Gary Fisher Tass and a Trek (can not remember the model name), while sitting on the bike at the bike shop the Trek felt more comfortable. and the Tass's long top tube made me stretch too much. But, when I took them out for test rides - the Tass felt much better (in climbing, turning, energy transfer etc.) than the Trek. Also, things like Stem, handlebar, length of the crank arm, angles of the seat and head tube are important consideration. but, over all test riding is by far the best way to decide about a bike. It would be ideal if you could test ride the bike in the kind of condition you would be using it in, but I have not found a bike shop who would let me take a bike for test riding in real trails. Although, you can borrow your friends bike and test it on your preferred trails, if your friends happen to own the brand/model you want.

good luck.
+1 on the Tass

I made a move from a 21" rock hopper to a 17.5" Tass. Most of my riding was on technical trails with lots of switch backs, so a shorter bike let me 'throw it around' much easier. I haven't looked back since. I'm 6'1" BTW

The hardest thing was test riding the bike.

Might be a worthwhile thread to start, 'How to test ride'. Doing a couple small curb drops / benches in the parking lot is a lot different the climbing up a hill filled with roots and rocks. Just my .02...

Speaking of muddy hills... i need to ride...
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Old 10-26-06, 12:40 PM
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Xl

Originally Posted by qwerty11
What do you guys think?
Like shirts, sometimes they're made too big, and sometimes they're too small. And of course sometimes different people prefer a different fit. That's what fitting rooms are for.

I'm 6'3" and I like my bikes big. My size is typically the largest they have ... XL. I am on a 22" Karate Monkey that fits AWESOME, I had previously rode a 23" Giant Yukon that was short in the top tube.

I swapped bikes with an LBS owner who is a full 1" taller than me. He was riding an "large" equivalent with carbon chainstays. It felt like I was WAY out on top of the front wheel and the saddle was MONDO over the front wheel. But it was still a good little ride. I liked his felt, he liked my Karate Monkey. But I would definitely have chosen the next size higher Felt.

ON EDIT:
Yes, you probably have to take riding style into account. For XC you should consider a larger frame. For more aggresive styles, you would probably want to drop a size or two.

Last edited by willtsmith_nwi; 10-26-06 at 12:55 PM.
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Old 10-26-06, 06:33 PM
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Originally Posted by qwerty11
What do you guys think?
I think you need to ride some bikes. I would try a 19" and a 21" frame. I'm 6'2" with long legs (37.2 inseam) and I ride a 19" frame because I need a short top-tube.
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Old 10-26-06, 08:19 PM
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qwerty11
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I was mainly looking at an 07 stumpjumper fsr
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Old 10-26-06, 09:33 PM
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jm01 , agree! , what jm01 said. specialized should be around 19' for you
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Old 10-27-06, 12:09 AM
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Originally Posted by willtsmith_nwi
Like shirts, sometimes they're made too big, and sometimes they're too small. And of course sometimes different people prefer a different fit. That's what fitting rooms are for.
Well put...at 6'5...I don't always ride the biggest bike in the fleet...in the end, it depends on how I intend to abuse her
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Old 10-27-06, 02:14 AM
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Originally Posted by jm01
it's not that simple...the most critical measurement is the top tube length and head tube length, and every mfg does their own thing
Headtube? You mean seat tube?

But yeah each bike is different, and everybody rides there bike differently and for different purposes so a test ride is the best thing

Last edited by blue_neon; 10-27-06 at 02:35 AM.
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Old 10-27-06, 11:05 AM
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the shirt analogy does not quite capture the essense of bike sizing. if you wear a wrong size shirt it is not going to hurt you as badly as if you ride a wrong size bike. learnt from experience. Being poor for too long I used to ride what I could find on a clearance deal, garage sale, or ebay. So, several times I ended up with wrong size bikes. I am 5'10" with 32 inseam. I used to ride a Giant iguana that was a 19.5 inch bike, too big for me. it gave me serious lower back problem and couple of time I crashed pretty badly on trails. I have also ridden bikes that are too small for me, a 16 inch Gary Fisher (dont remember the model name). I had to put the seat up so high that the bike gave me a road bike like sitting position, which was awefully uncomfortable on trails. it also affected my breathing (small cockpit) and movement on the bike.

So, the point is a bike has to fit right, not too big not too small. People say err on the side of small but, i would argue that small could be equally uncomfortable (with different types of consequences). Finally, if you have money, time and resources (good local bike shop, good rapport etc.) you should get your bike properly fitted. Any particular brand or frame may not give you the perfect fit, but if you play around with the stem, handle bar, and the seat, you sould be able to find something close to perfect....and something thats right for you.

thanks.
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Old 10-27-06, 12:09 PM
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I'm only 6' but I was most comfortable on a xl. Most people were telling me L but I'm glad I went to the shop and tried bikes before I bought something-although that bike got stolen-but now I know if I ever see a sweet deal online that I prefer the bigger size.
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Old 10-27-06, 12:35 PM
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I would have to say that I agree with most people here. You can only really get a rough estimate from just going by your height. There are a lot more factors that go into deciding on a size. You need to think about torso length, arm length, and leg length as well. The best way is to get somebody who knows proper posture, and how to fit you to a bike.. They can get you a lot closer estimate. But the only way you will know for sure is if you ride different bike. It is what is comfortable.
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