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is my mesa worth upgrading?

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is my mesa worth upgrading?

Old 04-23-07, 10:27 PM
  #1  
roundnround
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is my mesa worth upgrading?

I've been searching and searching these boards, and the general consensus of this bike that I got is that it is great for entry level, but that's about it. My schwinn is about 8 years old.

I don't ride too hard on my bike yet, and I've just poured TOO much into it before discovering this site.. Judy TT shocks, to replace the old RSTs, new cables, a computer, and new top neck? to adapt the front shock out of the older style goose neck? via a single screw setup.

But I can't stand the grip shifts that it has, and so if I get rid of the grip shift, I need to get new brake levers.

The front dérailleur clicks on the chain on the smallest crankset? in 8th gear. I'd like to rectify that, but do I need a new front dérailleur.

I've been eyeing some Trigger attack shifters, and avid brake levers, and want to eventually upgrade the rims and tires from the maxxis tires I have (no idea what style, they have a broken V pattern) to a beefier tire.

I'm only doing entry level mountain biking until I get my stamina back to where it once was long ago- hitting small trails of about 2 miles or so in length with plenty of roots and hills and narrow passes and mud, but I would like to eventually hit jumps with my bike, and so forth. But is this bike even worth upgrading?

I'm still really new to this whole scene, and I apologize for my lack of proper terminology. In a nutshell, should I just ride what I have how I want, and put the little upgrades INTO it, or save the cash towards another bike, even though what I have isn't really pleasant to ride in the first place, but is tolerable?
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Old 04-23-07, 10:33 PM
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Gripshift units are seperate from the brake levers.
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Old 04-23-07, 11:13 PM
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mine seems to be integrated into it, ^^^^ that's why I was curious.

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Old 04-23-07, 11:45 PM
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They may look like it, but I'm 110% certain they aren't integrated, I assemble/repair about 20 bikes a day total that comes with grip shift.
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Old 04-23-07, 11:55 PM
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okay, at least I know that much more about it. I still would like to get rid of them, that's for sure.
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Old 04-24-07, 12:38 AM
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Tires appear to be wider minotaurs, one of the greatest mud tires of all time. I'd keep them

Honestly, if you want to get further into mountain biking, a new bike wouldn't be a bad idea.
Your front derailleur rub is just an adjustment issue unless the pins are worn. Chances are you don't need a new derailleur though. You shouldn't be in the smallest chainring and 8th gear anyway, thats serious crosschaining and is bad for your drivetrain.
If you don't like the gripshift, you can pick up a pair of LX triggers and cheap brake levers for less than $50 total.
That stem is ridiculous, I don't know how you have any control with that thing. Get a shorter, flatter stem (one that doesn't point up like that) and your handling will improve dramatically.
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Old 04-24-07, 12:49 AM
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I'm guessing the stem is that which the handlebar is attached to?

that's what my LBS suggested I get, for one reason or another. I should have researched it more, and such. It is close to what the stock one was. As far as handling goes, I haven't any idea of how things could be better, that's the only setup I've ever known.

And no, for trail riding I'm never in the 8th gear. I'll have to look into those triggers and levers. Thanks for the advice! So the bike is worth modding then?
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Old 04-24-07, 01:17 AM
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yes, the stem is what connects the handlebar to the fork steerer (metal tube that comes up through the headtube of the frame, makes contact with headset). A stem like that will make for very poor, slow handling. Lower your handlebars and bring them closer to the frame (shorter stem, less rise) and your handling will get a lot quicker. You will also have your weight over the front end of the bike more, making climbing easier and putting you in a better position overall. Your shop probably recommended that stem to you because it's fine for very easy trails/bikepaths/roads but I woudl never want to ride anything like that while on good trails.

Whether or not the bike is worth upgrading depends on what you want to do with it and how much money you want to put into it. That bike is never going to be great, but it will be fine if you slowly upgrade parts to be lighter and more reliable. But that costs a lot of money, so in the end you have to decide if you just want to keep your bike how it is right now (minus the stem, that thing has got to go) and save up for a brand new, better bike (probably need $800-$1000) or keep the one you have and upgrade slowly (which will eventually cost the same but you'll still have a sub-par frame and other parts).
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Old 04-24-07, 01:26 AM
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wow, can't believe I've learned so much so FAR! As far as weight and additional performance is concerned, I'll probably keep an eye on a better bike in the future. For now I guess I'll just do a few upgrades that will make it more comfortable to ride (shifters, brake levers and grips). Most of the trails within earshot of me are simpler trails, and the more advanced are much further away.

Thanks for the advice. I'll look into a different stem. Are there any guidelines I should be looking to use when getting one? My size or reach playing a factor?

Thanks again!

BTW, I was pretty certain I was aware of what you were referring to, but I've always figured, if I don't know enough, assume I know nothing. That way I can learn from scratch instead of going into something half witted. Thanks for your patience.
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Old 04-24-07, 02:27 PM
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No problem, thats what places like this are for - those of us who have been diong this forever can help out guys like you who need some help

As far as the stem goes, go into your shop and tell them you want a more aggressive position. You can keep some rise, just not that much. Stem lenght and rise does depend on your body geometry, but also has a lot to do with personal preference.
I would go for something in the 100-110mm range, and a 'normal' rise, 6-7˚. You can keep the spacers underneath it if you still want a relaxed upright position.

Another change I would consider would be a better seat. A big, squishy seat like that is fine for short rides, but once you start riding more the cushion actually makes it more uncomfortable. You want the pressure on your sit bones, not your whole butt. Smaller, less padded seats may look uncomfortable but with a pair of cycling shorts with chamois, and some time in the saddle, they are actually much better (not to mention lighter!).

Have fun on the trails
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Old 04-24-07, 02:56 PM
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Maybe roundnround is too tall for the frame and that's why they suggested the long neck? If you're too tall then that would be a real reason to get a correctly sized bike and keep the judy and other stuff.

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Old 04-24-07, 04:48 PM
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perhaps, but my guess is they just set him up on that because for most people and upright position like that is more comfortable, and they probably assumed he wasn't riding trails much.
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Old 04-24-07, 05:42 PM
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In Re: stem

If you're comfortable with the stem, ride it the way it is. Mine sticks up like little Timmy w/ morning wood. Personaly, I don't like feeling like I'm going to faceplant all the time, yet I can climb just fine.
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Old 04-24-07, 06:22 PM
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Well, I'm 6'2, and weigh about 260, if that has any factoring into the equation.

I've taken the bike out a couple times, since the new neck and shocks. The trails I'm running have a good deal of inclines and declines, as well as plenty of roots. The judy holds up on rebounds real well but I do feel that my climbing could be improved, if I wasn't so far out front.
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Old 04-24-07, 11:37 PM
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What size frame is it? At 6'2" you could probably use a 20" or larger (depending on how much of that is leg and how much is torso).

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Old 04-25-07, 08:03 AM
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it looks like my 21" Mesa. That would be the right size for him.

To the OP- if you ever want to get rid of that frame, please let me know... I love the way mine rides
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Old 04-25-07, 01:45 PM
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yes, indeed, it is a 21".

sorry my friend, but even when I get a new bike, I'll still keep this one. Too many memories are on it.
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Old 04-25-07, 01:55 PM
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I've been searching and searching these boards, and the general consensus of this bike that I got is that it is great for entry level, but that's about it. My schwinn is about 8 years old.

So what's wrong with entry level?

I don't ride too hard on my bike yet, and I've just poured TOO much into it before discovering this site.. Judy TT shocks, to replace the old RSTs, new cables, a computer, and new top neck? to adapt the front shock out of the older style goose neck? via a single screw setup.

But I can't stand the grip shifts that it has, and so if I get rid of the grip shift, I need to get new brake levers.

The front dérailleur clicks on the chain on the smallest crankset? in 8th gear. I'd like to rectify that, but do I need a new front dérailleur.

This is an adjustment issue. Has nothing to do with a new bike. New bikes rub too if adjusted incorrectly.

I've been eyeing some Trigger attack shifters, and avid brake levers, and want to eventually upgrade the rims and tires from the maxxis tires I have (no idea what style, they have a broken V pattern) to a beefier tire.

I'm only doing entry level mountain biking until I get my stamina back to where it once was long ago- hitting small trails of about 2 miles or so in length with plenty of roots and hills and narrow passes and mud, but I would like to eventually hit jumps with my bike, and so forth. But is this bike even worth upgrading?

Not according to the above paragraph.

I'm still really new to this whole scene, and I apologize for my lack of proper terminology. In a nutshell, should I just ride what I have how I want, and put the little upgrades INTO it, or save the cash towards another bike, even though what I have isn't really pleasant to ride in the first place, but is tolerable

Why isn't it pleasant to ride? I wouldn't keep a bike that wasn't pleasant to ride. I certainly wouldn't upgrade it.
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Old 04-25-07, 02:12 PM
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not sure why I said it wasn't pleasant to ride, it is. I won't deny posting that, but I don't know exactly what I was thinking when I did. What isn't pleasant about it, is the grip shift and the saddle.

I've since done some very rigorous research about the concerns I have with the bike, and while it won't get a very thorough upgrade with everything, I do want to make it more comfortable to ride and I do think that that is attainable. New shifters, brake levers, saddle, and grips. (the grips should be here in a day or so).

And there is nothing wrong with entry level. I have just advanced quickly in the dozen or so times I've taken it out on the trails; and was hoping I could take it up a notch with my skill advancement. But I will heed the advice of others on here, and just enjoy what I have, while I have it, and not worry about what I don't have.
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Old 04-25-07, 11:14 PM
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ride the hell out of it until you break something. When you do, it's time for an upgrade. The Mesa is a really great riding bike, enjoy!
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