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did i buy the wrong bike?

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did i buy the wrong bike?

Old 04-30-07, 07:26 AM
  #1  
robbonds
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did i buy the wrong bike?

bought my first bike over the weekend..i plan to do a lot of paved road riding and some off roading (trails etc...)

i bought a specialized rockhopper
Shimano FCM-341-8 crankset, Octalink Spline, replaceable rings Shimano cartridge bearing BB
Shimano HB-M65L, Center Lock disc hubs, 32h, QR
A1 Premium Aluminum frame, disc only, double butted TT and ORE DT, externally relieved head tube, internally relieved BB shell, reinforced disc mount, forged 3D dropouts
RockShox Dart 3 SL fork, 100mm, Mag Lower, 28.6mm Cro-Mo stanchions, coil spring, alloy steer, rebound adjust w/ lockout and preload adjust
Specialized 3D forged alloy stem, two bolt, 25.4mm, 10 degree rise
Shimano 415, mechanical disc brakes, 6" Center Lock rotors

This bike seemed a little slow on paved roads


should i have bought the crosstail instead?
RST Vouge Comp, magnesium legs, alloy steerer, steel stanchions, coil sping w/ hydraulic lock out
Specialized Body Geometry, super light foam grips
Avid BB-5 mechanical disc brakes, G2 Clean Sweep 160mm rotor
Specialized Crosstrail Disc rims, double wall w/ machine sidewalls and eyelets
Specialized Borough XC tires, 1.9" w/ aramid bead, 60TPI


I think they will let me swap it since its only been a couple days..any suggestions?
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Old 04-30-07, 07:44 AM
  #2  
sherpaPeak
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with some minor modification you can ride the Rockhopper on and off road pretty comfortably. like, thinner semi-slick tires....

although the Corsstrails are more gear towards city commuting and touring....you can also do some off road riding with it....

so, I would not say you bought a wrong bike (cause the rockhopper will still serve your purpose), but, you can buy a differently set up bike (crosstrail) geared more towards your riding needs....

was that too vague? sorry...
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Old 04-30-07, 08:14 AM
  #3  
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I too own a (base model) rockhopper. I ride it everywhere -- to run errands, on serious trails, just around the neighborhood for fun with the girlfriend, and on paved rides for fitness. It's nowhere near as quick as my road bike, but unless I'm in a hurry, I don't care.

I think the rockhopper is a much more versatile bike that the crosstrail. If you get into trail riding, your rockhopper will take you a long way -- the crosstrail will not. And with some proper tires (the stock ones are crap for paved AND trail riding) you will find the rockhopper can handle city life quite well.

Remember to use the lockout function on your fork if you're going to be on paved for any length of time. That will save a lot of energy. And also be sure your saddle is fully up (for your fit) - better efficiency, more aero position, etc. If you're not hitting the trails real hard yet, get a tire that's 1.8-2.0 inches wide and has a nice smooth/nearly smooth center tread (can have some nice knobbies on the sides for cornering in dirt if you like) and you'll pick up 2-3mph cruising speed on the roads, not to mention save your tires. Knobbies wear FAST on pavement.
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Old 04-30-07, 08:18 AM
  #4  
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how do you use the preload knob - opposite the lockout knob on the fork?
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Old 04-30-07, 08:41 AM
  #5  
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Originally Posted by robbonds
how do you use the preload knob - opposite the lockout knob on the fork?

Well, the manual for my fork (the Judy J3 SL -- the same as your fork, but they changed the name to dart this year) says to sit on the bike and adjust preload until you have 20-30mm sag (i.e. compression of the fork from sitting on the bike). But that seems to be nearly impossible (and I weigh 235 lbs) and against the advice of most people/other fork manufacturers. I shoot for 10mm sag, or roughly 10% of the fork travel. For me, that means completely loosening the preload setting, but I have the stiffest spring available in my fork. If you're having a hard time determining how far the fork is moving, use a zip tie against the oil seal area, but on the stanchion. How far it moves when you sit on it is your sag. you can cut it off easily later.

Note that it's important to also tune the damping/rebound setting on the bottom of the right leg. I tune it after setting the preload. I like to run it at it's quickest rebound setting that doesn't kick-back over bumps. If you run it slower, it'll tend to "pack up" or progressively decrease your travel over series of bumps (i.e. roots, baby heads) until you have to stop/unweight the fork to get it to extend back to it's full length.
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Old 04-30-07, 09:16 AM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by kandnhome
If you run it slower, it'll tend to "pack up" or progressively decrease your travel over series of bumps (i.e. roots, baby heads) until you have to stop/unweight the fork to get it to extend back to it's full length.
You know Ive seen this in print recently, and can see how it might work in theory. But in real life applications, you would have to hit proggressively bigger obstacles, one after another, while maintaining enough speed to keep compressing the fork? I could see downhill riders having this happen, but for an old XC rider like me this would never be an issue.
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Old 04-30-07, 11:11 AM
  #7  
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Originally Posted by born2bahick
You know Ive seen this in print recently, and can see how it might work in theory. But in real life applications, you would have to hit proggressively bigger obstacles, one after another, while maintaining enough speed to keep compressing the fork? I could see downhill riders having this happen, but for an old XC rider like me this would never be an issue.

Then you must ride some mighty smooth singletrack. I have had this become an issue to the point it almost pitched me over the bars while descending some very rooty/rocky singletrack here in Arkansas. And the obstacles don't have to get progressively bigger; if the rebound is too slow, once it compresses any amount, it's unable to rebound before the next impact, so the compression is additive. You could actually encounter progressively _smaller_ obstacles and have the same effect, provided you were going faster than the rebound rate could handle.

But then I do descend pretty quickly for a guy on a hardtail. I seem to keep up with most of the fully guys I've seen. That's the one redeeming feature of being heavy. Gravity works with you, occasionally.
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Old 04-30-07, 11:58 AM
  #8  
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Originally Posted by kandnhome
Then you must ride some mighty smooth singletrack. I have had this become an issue to the point it almost pitched me over the bars while descending some very rooty/rocky singletrack here in Arkansas. And the obstacles don't have to get progressively bigger; if the rebound is too slow, once it compresses any amount, it's unable to rebound before the next impact, so the compression is additive. You could actually encounter progressively _smaller_ obstacles and have the same effect, provided you were going faster than the rebound rate could handle.

But then I do descend pretty quickly for a guy on a hardtail. I seem to keep up with most of the fully guys I've seen. That's the one redeeming feature of being heavy. Gravity works with you, occasionally.
Now wait, It takes X force to compress a fork to a given point. your saying a smaller bump X-1 can compress it further? In order for this to happen a spring would have to be completely linear in it's travel.
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Old 04-30-07, 12:06 PM
  #9  
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http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=282025
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Old 04-30-07, 12:37 PM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by born2bahick
Now wait, It takes X force to compress a fork to a given point. your saying a smaller bump X-1 can compress it further? In order for this to happen a spring would have to be completely linear in it's travel.
Yes, actually it does have a completely linear spring rate. It's a coil sprung fork.

And to the OP, I'd say keep the rockhopper and get some slicks for riding the pavement and some knobbies for hitting the trails.
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Old 04-30-07, 12:47 PM
  #11  
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[QUOTE=TheFlip]Yes, actually it does have a completely linear spring rate. It's a coil sprung fork./QUOTE]

Wow!

Last edited by born2bahick; 04-30-07 at 12:52 PM.
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Old 04-30-07, 07:52 PM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by TheFlip
Yes, actually it does have a completely linear spring rate. It's a coil sprung fork.
I think that is a bogus statement.. linear would mean the first 10% and the last 10% would take an equal amount of force to compress... when the coil spring is compressed it get stiffer. it's the nature of a coil spring. So if it's packed up to 90% it would be very stiff and small bumps would not compress that final 10% as easy as the first 10%.. maybe that makes sense...
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Old 05-01-07, 05:55 AM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by DirtPedalerB
I think that is a bogus statement.. linear would mean the first 10% and the last 10% would take an equal amount of force to compress... when the coil spring is compressed it get stiffer. it's the nature of a coil spring. So if it's packed up to 90% it would be very stiff and small bumps would not compress that final 10% as easy as the first 10%.. maybe that makes sense...
Exactly! Most spring are designed with the first 20% being very linear, the next 60% moderately progressive, and the last 20% being very proggressive. OK I see where this is coming from, It's an exact quote from the Rockshox Dart owners manual. This is rediculous, if the fork will actually "pack up" and bottom out on it's slowest rebound setting, then it's a poor design for trail riding and should stick to city paths. It should never be so linier in it's travel than it could compress more than the biggest hit made it compress, slow rebound or not. I understand wanting the fork to rebound as quickly as possible, giving as much compliance to the next obstacle as you can. But to make a spring rate so compliant that baby heads, and rock gardens could eventually bottom it out unless the rebound is fairly fast would seem absurd.
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Old 05-01-07, 04:45 PM
  #14  
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I think you did fine.
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Old 05-01-07, 05:53 PM
  #15  
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You did just fine. Like stated in an earlier post, your Rockhopper will do anything you want.
Just change to a more road friendly tire and if you plan on ridding some good singletrack, just
slap the knobbies back on and go.

ODN
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Old 05-03-07, 08:55 AM
  #16  
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so consensus says keep the rockhopper?

thanks everyone
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Old 05-03-07, 10:09 AM
  #17  
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Sure, keep it.The tire lugs/profile/tread/width and tire pressure are what determine how fast any bike feels on a smooth road.This ignores rider position(air drag)- which is a function of the handlebars.seatpost height/frame config.
Your bike will be just as fast as the other one if you change tires.
You have a great all around type bike-urban streets,smoother roads, smooth trails,crummy trails-it is good for all them.Put on low rolling resistance high pressure tires,and it is a decent do anything touring bike.
MTBs of all types are much more versatile than road bikes.They can take the urban beating better than road bikes,and the more upright posture lets you see where you are going better.No question, they are generally slower-but that is the tires,and the posture-no free lunch.Road wheels/tires aren't so great taking curbs, potholes or bailing to the shoulder/grass when a huge diesel pickup with tow mirrors is rattling/clattering down on you.
Luck,
Charlie.
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Old 05-03-07, 06:27 PM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by phoebeisis
MTBs of all types are much more versatile than road bikes.
At least the current crop of racer wannabe road bikes. There are a few road bikes out there that are plenty versatile
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