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Truing a Wheel

Old 06-03-07, 08:33 PM
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pyroguy_3
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Truing a Wheel

Okay, I had a nice little wobble in my rear wheel from a random spoke break, and no spoke to replace it with for about a week. So I dissasembled the whole wheel down to the bare rim ( couldn't get the wobble out by means of spoke tension/ bending) and I gently bent it back into true with respect to a flat surface. Now that I have the reason as to why my wheel is apart I have some questions about my future truing stand purchase. First do most truing stands work in the same manner? For instance, the Minoura workman truing stand vs the Park TS-8 truing stand. Would I be better off buying the more expensive park, or will the minoura be just as effective? I don't want to break the bank, but I am willing to spend a reasonable amount of money, I don't want a shop-quality stand. Will I need a dishing guage? and what is a dishing guage? The ultimate pro truing stand (http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...71&PID=1204522) claims to not need a dishing tool. That's pretty much it, any other tips or knowledge anybody can impart would be awesome, too. Oh, and is there any alternative to park's 60$ spoke tension meter, besides the physical feel/ sound of the spokes?
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Old 06-03-07, 10:18 PM
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willtsmith_nwi
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If you don't mind dismounting the tire every time you want to use the stand, the Minoura will work fine. It's self centering so you really don't need a a dishing gauge. You really don't need a tension meter either.
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Old 06-03-07, 10:46 PM
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So the dishing tool is used to check whether the center of the rim, running around the circle, is in line with the center of the hub? And say I wanted a stand that would accept a wheel with and without a tire, would it still be self centering or am I not comprehending what self centering is? It comes down to: what would be the best stand for under about 70$? I can figure out how to use one, but I don't know what I should be looking for in my first stand.
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Old 06-03-07, 11:10 PM
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Don't take this the wrong way, but if you don't know what a dishing gauge is, well, I am a little concerned about how you will rebuild the wheel.

How did you bend the rim from a broken spoke? How bent was it?

Unless you plan to build wheels, or frequently true them (meaning you probably are not doing it right), you can get by by truing it on the bike--- to see if this is the kind of puzzle you enjoy playing with.
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Old 06-03-07, 11:13 PM
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Originally Posted by pyroguy_3
So the dishing tool is used to check whether the center of the rim, running around the circle, is in line with the center of the hub? And say I wanted a stand that would accept a wheel with and without a tire, would it still be self centering or am I not comprehending what self centering is? It comes down to: what would be the best stand for under about 70$? I can figure out how to use one, but I don't know what I should be looking for in my first stand.
Any of the stands you mentioned will work quite well for truing and will do a fine job if you want to build wheels. I doubt that you'll even have to take the tires off to true the wheel with any of them, either. I've used a very old version of the Minoura and never had to remove the tires. If you want to check for roundness, that's a different story

The dishing gauge is use to center the rim on the hub. A self centering wheel stand is one that will tell you if the rim is centered on the hub without using a dishing tool on it. Unless you are building wheels, seldom will you mess with the wheel enough to throw off the dish...at least enough to worry about.

I have a self-centering stand but I also have a dishing tool. I use both when I build wheels but only the stand when I'm tweaking the wheel. As for the tension meter, I'll confess to having one. I never use it.
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Old 06-04-07, 07:57 AM
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if you don't know what a dishing gauge is, well, I am a little concerned about how you will rebuild the wheel.
I'm not taking this the wrong way, but since this is the first time I will be attempting it I feel that it is valid that I've never used a dishing tool. I assume it is basically just a pointer that directs one to the center of the rim? I think I get what it does now, after reading " just turn the wheel over in the stand to check for dish". Thanks for all the help everybody.

How did you bend the rim from a broken spoke? How bent was it?
The spoke broke and my LBS did not have any that would fit mine. They didn't even have any too long or too short spokes, so I couldn't cheat it until the correct size came in. So after a week of sitting with no spoke in it, the wheel got a nice hitch in it which I tried to remove by overtightening the wheel in strategic places, over time. I couldn't get it back into true so I took everything off and did it on the floor with a couple chocks.
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Old 06-04-07, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by filtersweep
Don't take this the wrong way, but if you don't know what a dishing gauge is, well, I am a little concerned about how you will rebuild the wheel.
How else is one to learn? If the guy has the inclination, I say go for it. Though, I would start with cheapo straight gauge "Wheelmaster" spokes from QBP rather than DT Swiss or Wheelsmith spokes. My local guy sells them to me at $15 for a box of 70 (complete with nipples). There are numerous spoke length calculators online that you can use.

Add a cheapo hub and a cheapo rim, a copy of Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike repair and GO FOR IT!!!

Originally Posted by cyccommute
I doubt that you'll even have to take the tires off to true the wheel with any of them, either. I've used a very old version of the Minoura and never had to remove the tires. If you want to check for roundness, that's a different story
You either have to take off the tires or the centering gauge. I find removing the tires a lot easier. Besides, without a centering gauge it is easy to let your center drift. If you have large tires and tight tolerances already, a few mm shift followed by an especially hard drop may result in the wheel rubbing against a chainstay or front derailleur cage.

I do with that I had a Park professional stand supplemented with micrometer dials. Unfortunately, I do not. So I'll just take my tire off instead.
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