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Is a patched tire reliable?

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Is a patched tire reliable?

Old 06-14-07, 12:46 PM
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Hal Fisher
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Is a patched tire reliable?

Of course I mean with a decent job of installing them but is there an inherent problem with patches that they just don't last?
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Old 06-14-07, 12:49 PM
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I would only count on it to last long enough to get off the trail and to the LBS.
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Old 06-14-07, 01:03 PM
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Do you mean patched tubes? If you do it right (let the glue basically dry), then patches are forever. If you do it wrong, much like anything else in the world, it may not last.

I don't think most people patch tubes on the trail. Bring an extra tube and fix it when you get home.
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Old 06-14-07, 02:02 PM
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Now that I think about it I remember as a kid I was constently patching my tubes. They seem to last long enough to have a few patches on the tube before I threw it out. But that was like 40 years ago, so you can see how I forgot that.
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Old 06-14-07, 02:04 PM
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Originally Posted by bsyptak
Do you mean patched tubes?
Yup if that's the case then the answer is "yes". They will last as long as the tube.

... Brad
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Old 06-14-07, 02:38 PM
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Yes, only if done right. I have found once you get into the higher pressure tubes, like that of road bikes, then it gets far less reliable, but for most MTB tubes, patches work great. The real key is a good roughed clean surface for the glue to stick, and using alot of clamping pressure when applying the patch as the glue sets.

Personally, I carry a spare tube for fast replacement on the trail. I then repair the old tube when I get home. I use a bench vice and clamp the tube between a couple of boards. The patch will never come off.
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Old 06-14-07, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by mrchristian
The self adhesive ones suck however.
That's funny, my girlfriend rode a tube patched with a Park glueless patch for better than 2 years with the whole knobby-slick-knobby swap out routine. The only reason we had to junk the tube was because the valve failed. If that's sucking I'll take twelve.
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Old 06-14-07, 04:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Hal Fisher
Of course I mean with a decent job of installing them but is there an inherent problem with patches that they just don't last?
No inherent problem.
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Old 06-14-07, 04:16 PM
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I've had 2 cheap glueless patches on my rear tube for weeks now and I've ridden lots of miles like this. No problems whatsoever. I've gambled with 70 psi in them (for road riding) and they've held fine.
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Old 06-14-07, 04:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Patriot
Yes, only if done right. I have found once you get into the higher pressure tubes, like that of road bikes, then it gets far less reliable, but for most MTB tubes, patches work great. The real key is a good roughed clean surface for the glue to stick, and using alot of clamping pressure when applying the patch as the glue sets.
Personally, I carry a spare tube for fast replacement on the trail. I then repair the old tube when I get home. I use a bench vice and clamp the tube between a couple of boards. The patch will never come off.
The real key is to let the glue dry until it has a matte finish and then press the patch in place. No clamping needed. Even works for high pressure tires.
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Old 06-14-07, 04:54 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute
The real key is to let the glue dry until it has a matte finish and then press the patch in place. No clamping needed. Even works for high pressure tires.
This is true, but when you clamp it, you get a better surface bond. And, believe it or not, it does take a little while for those rubber contact adhesives to get a complete bond. It does grab initially, which is the majority of your bond, but if you let it sit a while under pressure, I have found it really does hold much better. Just my 2 cents.
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Old 06-14-07, 05:19 PM
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I tried patching a tire (not a tube)...............ONCE......... It was a low pressure tire and No it did not work. The only time I'll ever try anything like that again is if I'm on a trail and there are no other options. My track record patching tubes is OK with MTB tubes, not so good on tubes for 27" road tubes. No success with Presta valve tubes used on high pressure (105+ PSI) road tubes. That seems logical to me based on the pressure put on the repair.
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