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How to tote a camera.

Old 06-18-07, 08:49 PM
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How to tote a camera.

I was wondering how you guys with expensive dSLR cameras tote them around when you go off road riding. I was thinking a sling pack so that I could get to it fast and im just scared to stuff it in my camel back.
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Old 06-18-07, 09:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Pete ***erlin
I chuck the camera in a hydro pack.
Ditto
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Old 06-18-07, 09:57 PM
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I stuff mine into my jersey pockets on my back but mine is not big like a DSLR. I do wish it was a bit smaller though. Would make pulling it out a lot easier.
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Old 06-19-07, 08:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Pete ***erlin
I chuck the camera in a hydro pack.
hydro pack?
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Old 06-19-07, 08:28 AM
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Camelback
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Old 06-19-07, 09:45 AM
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or maybe nimrod...
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Old 06-19-07, 05:57 PM
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I would not take my DSLR Nikon on my bike...just too big/bulky and if you crash, well the potential there is a loss of $1000. I have 2 compact digital cameras that go with me and easily fit into a belly pack. I use Panasonic's and love them for their high quality Leica lense's and image stabilization. If you can find a discontinued, new or used FZ20 model..grab it...sometimes I think it takes better pics than my Nikon. Also check out Kodak 712 and 812 series...excellent camera and good value. See lots of models and reviews at www.dpreview.com.
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Old 06-19-07, 07:33 PM
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The rides I would take the dSLR on would pose minimal risk of a crash, more of a scenic ride with the intention of taking it easy taking it slow and taking lots of pictures. When I ride hard I don't even bother with a regular camera. I think I found a decent sling bag that will work nicely for rides that I take with the intention of taking photos, if it works out I should be able to snap some nice scenery.
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Old 06-19-07, 07:59 PM
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when i hit the trail and want to take my camera along, my rebel xti stays in one of these
http://www.lowepro.com/Products/Slin...ot_100_AW.aspx
it has room for an extra lens, a flash, and other little things
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Old 06-19-07, 08:13 PM
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as Brate said earlier, its only for one of those rides that is more of a scenic ride and not anything more. i would never trust myself to take my nice camera on something that i would need more than what my underseat bag can hold.
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Old 06-19-07, 08:31 PM
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What jnsey said, and jnsry thats one of the bags i was looking at.
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Old 06-19-07, 10:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Pete ***erlin
Well, the OP asked about carrying a dSLR after all so apparently he's not afraid of them being to big/bulky or worried about them surviving a crash.

If you can handle the weight, and can take advantage of a dSLR, you can be rewarded with much better photos than point and shoot cameras.
Yes, maybe he is not afraid...but then it seems that he has not done it, hence his question. My suggestion from experience and years of camera work is that todays compact digital cameras will in fact take as good a photo as a SLR....except for high speed movement where shutter lag time is critical. 90% of an outstanding photo has little to do equipment and everything to do with skills such as creativity, composure, light, patience, and luck. BTW, the term "point and shoot" could apply to DSLR on auto
...but then a decent photographer almost never shoots on auto mode. My point is never let equipment hinder your ability to capture a trip/event. I have seen people choose not to bring their full size DSLR camera (recent kayak trip comes to mind) because of bulk where a compact would be perfect. Sad reality is that most people are clueless as to how they even operate outside of automatic mode. That said, for purely action or fast movement shots, l would go SLR...but for bike riding, I'll stick with a compact with full feature settings and through the lens ability (as in a LCD screen sucks in bright daylight).
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Old 06-19-07, 10:34 PM
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Originally Posted by jimx200
That said, for purely action or fast movement shots, l would go SLR...but for bike riding, I'll stick with a compact with full feature settings and through the lens ability (as in a LCD screen sucks in bright daylight).
So bike riding isn't "action" or "fast movement" for you?
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Old 06-19-07, 10:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Pete ***erlin
The results are much better.
+1
I was looking at your website, pretty amazing. You definately know what you're doing.
I would love to get a dSLR and learn how to hake high quality pics, but one expensive hobby (bikes) is hard enough to sustain on a high school budget
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Old 06-19-07, 10:43 PM
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I believe the op was going to use a camera for scenic work...high speed shutter not required. Now if he wanted to capture a rider in mid-air, it could be done with a compact set with fast shutter, but a SLR would be much easier.
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Old 06-19-07, 10:56 PM
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Pete, Leica lenses are not, as you say "plastic" and in fact "real glass" and one of the premium optics available. Oh, and I'm not talking about a $100. pocket camera or "point/shoot" as you refer. BTW, why carry a strobe when he's shooting scenery? If the op wants to carry 20 lbs. of camera gear, hey sounds good to me. But there are alternatives that will yield the same results in many situations by using a high quality compact (with "real glass lenses" too).
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Old 06-19-07, 10:59 PM
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OK, Pete, you win. Yes, it could be done with a slower (define slow) shutter, but tell me how that makes a better pic?
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Old 06-20-07, 05:07 AM
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it's not an expensive DSLR, but if i take my camera (a canon s1) with me, i just wrap it up in a small towel and shove it in my hydration pack, which is large enough to hold the camera, plus a bunch of other stuff.
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Old 06-20-07, 09:04 AM
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Man all my threads about cameras start debates from simple questions... here is why I want to take a SLR..

1)Superior lenses
2)Superior light sensors
3)Superior motion shots (I like to take shots of other riders and wildlife in action)
4)Larger image sensors and better lenses will result in a photo that is better than any point and shoot.

Thats just what I know, yes I'm new to SLR photography and yes I have a point a shoot that works for basic scenery shots (and they look good too) but usually there is more to shoot than just trees, trails and dirt that a point and shoot or even an advanced point and shoot cant truly capture in the detail and clarity that I want.

I think Pete understand me the most..
To me "scenic ride" doesn't limit the photograph to "scenic work." But maybe that's just me.
Ill keep looking for a nice bag to keep the camera on my back, I have a seat bag for repair supplies, a stem bag for snackage and water bottle cage for water.
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Old 06-20-07, 05:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Pete ***erlin
Because panning is a basic photographic technique that can add a feeling of movement and drama to a photograph as opposed to just cranking up the shutter speed and shooting snapshot style.

Given your self-professed experience and years of camera work, I'm surprised that you an unfamiliar with panning.

p.s. Slow can be in the 1/40 range in the scenario that you described (rider in mid-air).
It's like the Hydra, cut one head off and a couple more grow out of the bloody stump.

How's this for a dilemma? I put mine inside a padded Lowe case and then inside my Camelbak. Holy Moly, Batman!

Yeah, panning is basic.
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Old 06-21-07, 08:26 AM
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I only *wish* I could take my camera equipment with me, but it's too much; too heavy & too expensive (Nikon D70s; Nikon 18-70 mm zoom lens; Tokina 100-300 mm zoom lens; lens extender rings (for photomacrography); big, bulky camera bag; extra battery & charger; tripod... You get the...ummm...picture.))
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Old 06-21-07, 09:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Mountain_Owl
I only *wish* I could take my camera equipment with me, but it's too much; too heavy & too expensive (Nikon D70s; Nikon 18-70 mm zoom lens; Tokina 100-300 mm zoom lens; lens extender rings (for photomacrography); big, bulky camera bag; extra battery & charger; tripod... You get the...ummm...picture.))
I rode in with a D70s, 18-70mm, 50mm, sb600, couple of pocket wizards, extra batteries and a tripod all in a hydro pack on my back… and…. um..I got the picture. (I left the extension tubes and battery charger at the condo.)

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Old 06-21-07, 09:54 AM
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Brate, my post to you was a suggestion that a high end, compact camera may be a better alternative in many situations for bike carry...they are smaller and in the right hands, can take a very good photo. I'm talking about some of the high end compacts, not the point/shoot cheapies Pete kept referring to. My post should have been more specific about my choice for trail carry and I did not intend to discount you wanting to use your SLR. My bias comes from many of my riding buds that will not take their full size cameras because of carry difficulties and fear of damage...what a waste of opportunity. My belief is a premium brand compact is a better choice if worried about those issues...your choice may differ. You referenced a scenic ride, taking it slow and easy. To me that meant getting off the bike, taking shots, and not high speed photography where the SLR would be a better choice. Serious trails? No thanks, too much weight trying to push me off balance and a fall with a full size SLR and equipment would be painful.
And yes Pete, I know how to pan...fact is, you come across as pretty anal with your comments. And Pete, I do have years of experience (seems this bothers you)...and as you are aware (hopefully), there are many ways/techniques to get a good shot.

Brate, post some of those ride pics when you can. Ride safe and enjoy the ride.
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Old 06-21-07, 11:28 AM
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Soon as this damn rain stops and my trails are pretending to be rivers... >.<
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Old 06-21-07, 07:52 PM
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I'm a nature photographer that is just getting into cycling... My main focus is on bird photography and I just purchased a MTB with the idea that I'll be able to get to more remote locations for my photography and hopefully shed a few pounds in the process. I don't foresee myself taking any extreme trails while I have my gear with me.

This is my plan... I don't know if it will work out how I envision it but I'll give it my best. I have ordered a Blackburn EX-1 rack on which I plan on mounting a 19" plastic tool-box. I bought a square yard of 1" thick high-density foam from a fabric store and custom padded the interior of the box so that it will hold one camera body, my 300mm f4 prime, a teleconverter, a flash unit, and a couple smaller wide-angle lenses. It also has room for a few other smaller items (spare batteries, cards, flash cord, etc). I also plan to place a tripod on top of the tool box and secure it with bungees. As I said, I've only recently purchased my bike so I'm not sure how it will work out. It's going to add a good 15-20 lbs to the bike when I have all my gear with me. Here's a photo of the interior of the box...

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