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Need Help with what bike to get

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Need Help with what bike to get

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Old 12-06-03, 01:54 PM
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DH_frc
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Need Help with what bike to get

Hi, I'm just getting back into mountain biking after being off for a few years with a knee injury that refused to heal, and I'm out looking at some new bikes. For the first couple of months all I'll be doing is pretty much re-introducing my self to the sport of mountain biking, but after that I will be getting into the heavy stuff, like drops, teeter-totters, some dirt jumping and also I want to get into Downhill. Now, my money situation is not good, and fortunately, I have about $2000 Canadian coming as a x-mas gift. I'm planning on getting a bike with that money but my dad is very old fashion and he thinks that $400 bike is WAY too expensive. I've convinced him to let me spend up to $900. I'm thinking of a Kona Scrap 2004. Then last week my Norco dealer put on a sale with the 2003 Norco Atomik for $1699. My dad is willing to let me spend that amount on that bike ONLY. If I don't go with the AtomiK I have to go back to the $900 Scrap. My dilemma here is that all of my friends have Kona hardtails and are into the urban riding and if I get the Atomik, will I be able to keep up with them doing the urban stuff, with the weight of the bike, and still whip their buts on the Downhill and Duel Slalom course on the local Mtn? Also, with winter coming im wondering what would you recommend for me to wear. And I don't want lycra!

Please note: I'm 6'1 and about 200lbs and im 15 years old so I still have some growing to do. And all prices are in Canadian.
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Old 12-07-03, 02:59 AM
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bentrim
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That's quite a dilemma. But I think you have answered your own question.

If it were me, I would probably get the hardtail since I would probably be doing the same type of riding as my friends and want to be able to keep up.

Then again, you're a big boy (and growing), have a recuperating knee, and want to do downhill and heavy stuff as you say, so a full suspension bike might be a better compromise. You might find yourself in granny gear a lot though and behind the rest of the pack if you have some hills to go up for urban rides but an fs is probably more versatile for your needs (and knees).
 
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Old 12-07-03, 04:05 AM
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...and as for the winter wear, you can use the layering method for temperatures that are at freezing or just slightly below.

Head: wear a knitted hat like a toque, or beanie with your helmet over it.

Top: wear a wicking layer (like a long sleeve Nike Dri-fit, or Coolmax shirt) to evaporate moisture off your skin, then a fleece "hoodie" for warmth, and a lightweight water repellent jacket to keep out rain and wind.

Bottom: same thing as top. I wear Nike Dri-Fit polyester running pants as my wicking layer, then some armor (padded) shorts and leg/knee protectors for protection and added warmth, and then abrasion/rain resistant trail pants. **Tip: wearing body armor protects you in a fall but also keeps you warm.

Feet: wear nylon socks (for wicking), extra socks for warmth, and an outdoor/hiking shoe.

Hands: full finger riding gloves, and some knitted liners.

Knapsack: So you can remove layers to suit your comfort and pack it away in your knapsack.

I own some cycling specific clothes -- like Race Face pants and jacket -- but I don't see any real advantages. Anything that does the job will do.
 
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Old 12-07-03, 05:18 AM
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If your on a bit of a budget cycle specific clothing can be expensive, I work outdoors all year round and find that cotton long johns and vest work very well as base layers, and are cheaply availible.
Any ordinary cargo pants and fleece top will effectivly keep you warm. If it rains I tend to use very light rain proof overtrouser that can be stuffed in a small bag when not used, if you get overtrouser make sure they fit well I sometime's go for slightly small so they are not to baggy. Just try em on first over what you will wear on the trail to get a good fit.
For rainproof jacket I do not like the really thin pack away stuff I just don't find them comfortable. The jacket is probably the only bit of clothing that I will buy that is cycle specific, as its what I wear most and I want it comfortable.
Will you be riding in really extreme weather? if so there will be other things you might want to consider like water proof sock's or boot protectors, and decent waterproof glove's are a must, or use something like waterproof Seal skinz under your normal glove.
Winter is a harsh time to ride but being well prep'd will make it much more enjoyable, padding around your knee's is probaly a must for you.

I love winter riding me, snot dangaling from yer nose, tears freezing to your cheeks, and black toes BLISS...

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Old 12-07-03, 01:25 PM
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bentrim
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Originally Posted by Evo
If your on a bit of a budget cycle specific clothing can be expensive, I work outdoors all year round and find that cotton long johns and vest work very well as base layers, and are cheaply availible.
Any ordinary cargo pants and fleece top will effectivly keep you warm. If it rains I tend to use very light rain proof overtrouser that can be stuffed in a small bag when not used, if you get overtrouser make sure they fit well I sometime's go for slightly small so they are not to baggy. Just try em on first over what you will wear on the trail to get a good fit.
For rainproof jacket I do not like the really thin pack away stuff I just don't find them comfortable. The jacket is probably the only bit of clothing that I will buy that is cycle specific, as its what I wear most and I want it comfortable.
Will you be riding in really extreme weather? if so there will be other things you might want to consider like water proof sock's or boot protectors, and decent waterproof glove's are a must, or use something like waterproof Seal skinz under your normal glove.
Winter is a harsh time to ride but being well prep'd will make it much more enjoyable, padding around your knee's is probaly a must for you.

I love winter riding me, snot dangaling from yer nose, tears freezing to your cheeks, and black toes BLISS...

Evo

Great tips. And may I add that you can make some clothes water repellent (depending on the fabric) by using Scotch Guard, or Nik Wax.

Last edited by bentrim; 12-07-03 at 05:09 PM.
 
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