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What SHOULD the LBS Charge for this?

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What SHOULD the LBS Charge for this?

Old 09-22-08, 08:59 AM
  #1  
nolagrrl
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What SHOULD the LBS Charge for this?

I have a 2008 Cannodale F6 that I am upgrading to Avid BB7 disc brakes and Avid Speed Dial levers. For this upgrade I also bought a Sun Rhynolite with Deore Hubs wheelset that is disc ready, since the stock wheelset is not.

I had considered doing the install myself after watching some how to videos on You Tube. It really doesn't look that difficult, but then it was pointed out to me that I will have to take the cassette off the old wheels and install it on the new wheels. I was also told that I would need some specialized tools(torque wrench, torx wrench, cable cutters, cassette remover, etc.) After looking online and seeing how much these tools cost, I'm realizing that this could add up.

How much would/should a LBS charge for a disc installation, brake lever install, cassette install? I know the price will vary from shop to shop, but I'm trying to get a general idea just to see which method I should choose.

Keep in mind, I bought all parts online thinking I would do the install myself. Will the LBS be a little pissed that I didn't buy any parts from them and cop an attitude(I've read about this on these boards from time to time)? I still need to buy a new cassette for the new wheelset, so will get that from whichever LBS I choose. Cassettes aren't too expensive are they? I believe the F6 is an 8spd.

Thanks!

Edit: Just talked to a LBS over the phone to try and get a general quote and the guy said they won't give me a quote unless I bring the bike down there so they can "evaluate" it. It's a brand new Cannondale F6, what exactly needs to be evaluated? I don't want to have to cart my bike around to every bike shop in town to get a general quote. What if I get it down there, they quote something ridiculous, and then I have to leave. Just seems like a pain in the butt. Is this a general practice? I understand they could give me a quote over the phone, but that once I bring it in, something may make the quote higher...I do understand that. I'm just trying to get a general idea of what shop I will choose for this install.
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Old 09-22-08, 09:23 AM
  #2  
Smallguy
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I'd call a different shop

any good lbs should be able to say it'll be roughly X as what your doing is pretty standard
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Old 09-22-08, 10:22 AM
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sonic six13
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its impossible to quote over the phone. bike shops dont do that because if they say something an then you bring in the bike and its totally not like described or the bike needs a lot more work then it puts the lbs in an odd position because they said one price and now have to go back and say another higher price.

You bring the bike in, the go over it, give you a labor price and you leave the bike. easy as that.

They will probably charge you 20-25 dollars per brake to set up, and then 5-10 to swap the cassett and maybe like 10 to swap the wheel set.

your looking at prob 60 dollars labor.

It is worth it if you dont have a clue what your doing. bb7's are nice brakes dont chance messing it up your self. bring it to the LBS and have them do it
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Old 09-22-08, 10:35 AM
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Just take the two rear wheels in, get them to swap the cassette. Do the rest yourself.
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Old 09-22-08, 10:54 AM
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Didn't you buy the bike off of a friend? Find out who sold the bike originally and go see them. You should try to build up a good relationship with an LBS, and what better place than where the bike was originally bought from.
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Old 09-22-08, 11:10 AM
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junkyard
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Bring it to Cheeto. He'll fix it up real nice.
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Old 09-22-08, 11:17 AM
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This doesn't really answer your question, but...

Buy a basic toolkit like this: http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...tegory_ID=4218 , and you will be able to do most repairs and upgrades yourself for many years to come. Also, a good repair stand is definitely worth the money.
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Old 09-22-08, 01:30 PM
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Invest in the tools. If you ever have to do this again they will pay for themselves. You don't need super specialized tools. For example I just use a plain old wire cutter instead of a expensive park tool one. Wheel building I would leave to a shop but I think everything else you could do yourself.
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Old 09-22-08, 01:38 PM
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What you're describing is very simple to do if you have the tools. Performance sells a good set with all the tools you'd need for about $109-119 when on sale. Ok. the Performance tools aren't as good as Park but if you're not going to use them a lot then they do the job with no problems. Get the tools and the most recent Bicycling Maintainance book and you should be able to fiqure it out.
BB7's are easy to install. They're self adjusting, just follow the directions they come with. If you were putting on hydros then I would agree, have the LBS do it.
You can also look at the price of the individual tools and save a bunch of money. A cassette lockring tool is not expensive, and other then that all you need is a metric set of hex-keys and socket set. You can probably get along without a torque wrench but even there Sears has them starting at $25.
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Old 09-22-08, 01:57 PM
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A shop should charge roughly $60 to $75 bucks. Changeover is simple provided your frame and fork are both disc ready. If one or the other lacks disc mounts then you are SOL!

The shop will have a few incidentals such as cable housing, clips for the housing, etc that you may have added to their labor costs.

I'd caution that unless you bought the parts from the shop, you have no warranty if anything breaks, and they may not be as willing either to take the job, or to stand behind it and fix stuff if something goes wrong. Having said that, the install is simple, quick and not a whole lot that might go wrong.

I echo some earlier comments about doing the job yourself, even if you have to recruit someone who has some mechanical experience to guide you thru the process. You'll learn about the bike and brakes, be able to fix them or adjust them easier, etc.

As a final note I have those mechanical brakes on one of my bikes. They are nice mechanical disc brakes, but for the riding I do discs are pretty much a hassle. I hate having to constantly true the disc or adjust the pads to stop rub (I have no tolerance at all for any amount of rub). I rarely ride when it is wet, so rim brakes work just fine for me and are less weight and less maitenance than discs. Getting those brakes centered and adjusted is pretty simple and quick. Keeping them that way requires a lot of tinkering, nearly constant if you ever remove the wheels (which I do every time I ride). Beyond that, they will give you great service. Good luck.
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Old 09-22-08, 09:27 PM
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Try it yourself and then bring it to the shop to make minor adjustments, just in case. You'll need special tools for the cassette removal and install, but that should be 5-10 dollars tops. Besides that, it's pretty self-explanatory. Stuff you learn along the way, like adjusting the brakes and levers, swapping tires/tubes, and putting on and tightening parts is going to be beneficial in the future.
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