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Does anybody still mt bike with no suspension bikes?

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Does anybody still mt bike with no suspension bikes?

Old 12-17-05, 08:36 AM
  #101  
IndyJonez
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Sounds easy enough.
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Old 12-17-05, 11:15 AM
  #102  
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Originally Posted by IndyJonez
Sounds easy enough.
It's slightly harder than that though. You do have to hunt around for a good steel fork. They're out there but the selection isn't huge. You will need to make sure you get one that is suspension-corrected if your frame was designed for suspension. The key is measuring the axle-to-crown distance of the original fork and matching it. If you get a fork with a shorter AtC then your steering will be twitchier than designed. If you get one that is longer than it will be more lax. Surly is a good source for forks. Kona also makes a nice one.

Another thing you will have to concern yourself with is the rear derailleur... or rather lack thereof. You will need to check your dropouts. Most frames won't have SS compatible horizontal dropouts or track-ends so you'll need to deal with that. There are several ways to do this. One way is to get a special hub that mounts into a vertical/semi-vertical dropout but can be adjusted to regulate chain tension. You'll need a single-speed hub as it is. Another way is to convert the dropout itself. Some bikes have repacable dropouts and some manufacturers make a track-end style or horizontal dropout for their frames. As a last resort, you can make friends with someone who has welding skills and have them knock out and weld on new dropouts. A less clean solution is to use a chain tensioner. These mount up to your derailleur hanger. They work but don't look quite as nice.

Do your research before you buy stuff for a buildup. There's plenty of information out there. Check in with the Singlespeed & Fixed Gear forum.
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Old 12-17-05, 11:40 AM
  #103  
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I believe I'd rather have a fully built bike to begin with, I know next to nothing about building my own bike and although it would be a great learning experience it would probably also get frustrating to me because I would be so eager to ride.

Maybe I'll build one later on when I up my riding skills.

Can anyone reccommend a SS bike? I think I'd want a travel fork on the front rather than a rigid to begin with since it's cheap to upgrade to later on. Plus I'm interested in a Steel frame also, I liked the GF Rig but it's aluminum and I want something I can beat around that will last. Since the GF Rig cost around $1000, surely there is another bike with close to the same set-up that is steel for around $1000 or am I wrong?

Thanx for the replies.
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Old 12-17-05, 12:23 PM
  #104  
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Originally Posted by IndyJonez
I believe I'd rather have a fully built bike to begin with, I know next to nothing about building my own bike and although it would be a great learning experience it would probably also get frustrating to me because I would be so eager to ride.

Maybe I'll build one later on when I up my riding skills.

Can anyone reccommend a SS bike? I think I'd want a travel fork on the front rather than a rigid to begin with since it's cheap to upgrade to later on. Plus I'm interested in a Steel frame also, I liked the GF Rig but it's aluminum and I want something I can beat around that will last. Since the GF Rig cost around $1000, surely there is another bike with close to the same set-up that is steel for around $1000 or am I wrong?

Thanx for the replies.
There are good option even below $1000. IMO some interesting options in steel SS are:
1) Redline Monocog
2) Jamis Exile SS
3) Bianchi MUSS, SASS, etc
4) Kona Unit
5) Surly 1x1

For around $1000 I would probably pick the Jamis. I would suggest that you go and read the SS forum at mtbr.com. Personally, I like having gears but those folks really do a good job in brain washing and converting people to SS.
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Old 12-17-05, 01:49 PM
  #105  
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Originally Posted by khuon
It's slightly harder than that though. You do have to hunt around for a good steel fork. They're out there but the selection isn't huge. You will need to make sure you get one that is suspension-corrected if your frame was designed for suspension. The key is measuring the axle-to-crown distance of the original fork and matching it. If you get a fork with a shorter AtC then your steering will be twitchier than designed. If you get one that is longer than it will be more lax. Surly is a good source for forks. Kona also makes a nice one.

Another thing you will have to concern yourself with is the rear derailleur... or rather lack thereof. You will need to check your dropouts. Most frames won't have SS compatible horizontal dropouts or track-ends so you'll need to deal with that. There are several ways to do this. One way is to get a special hub that mounts into a vertical/semi-vertical dropout but can be adjusted to regulate chain tension. You'll need a single-speed hub as it is. Another way is to convert the dropout itself. Some bikes have repacable dropouts and some manufacturers make a track-end style or horizontal dropout for their frames. As a last resort, you can make friends with someone who has welding skills and have them knock out and weld on new dropouts. A less clean solution is to use a chain tensioner. These mount up to your derailleur hanger. They work but don't look quite as nice.

Do your research before you buy stuff for a buildup. There's plenty of information out there. Check in with the Singlespeed & Fixed Gear forum.
It is as easy as that, if you can find a 95-97 Specialized steel frame. Than buy a Surly 1x1 fork.The only thing that sucks is there are no rear disc tabs. I run Vs in the back and a disc up front. They have semi horizonal drops and there is plenty of room for chain tension adjustment. You don't need a SS hub, just get a spacer kit and a DX or CK cog. I use a XTR hub with a Wheels Man. spacer kit, works perfect. But if you want to buy a pre-built SS I would get a Kona Unit.
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Old 12-17-05, 03:53 PM
  #106  
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Originally Posted by jz19
There are good option even below $1000. IMO some interesting options in steel SS are:
1) Redline Monocog
2) Jamis Exile SS
3) Bianchi MUSS, SASS, etc
4) Kona Unit
5) Surly 1x1

For around $1000 I would probably pick the Jamis. I would suggest that you go and read the SS forum at mtbr.com. Personally, I like having gears but those folks really do a good job in brain washing and converting people to SS.
Add the On One Inbred SS 29'er in there. I just spent right at 1k to get it shipped from England with a set of BB7's tossed in the box. The one really cool thing is that around spring time there should be an entry level 29'er SS for under $500 in that group. Think it is a Monocog, not sure but there are more and more solid options. The Inbred can be bought as a complete bike from On One.
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Old 12-18-05, 12:58 PM
  #107  
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it's pretty cold out these days and yesterday at zero degrees my suspension fork didn't work, it was rather ridgid, extremely ridgid. I've known this for years, but I've really noticed a lot more ridgid forks being used in the cold weather. I don't think there is a bicycle suspension that will work properly below 10 degrees. Front suspension is the ultimate in the summer. But in the snow I think ridgid forks make more sense. in fact a ridgid singlespeed would probably be the ultimate winter bike (at least riding through the snow) I can't lock my 27 speed mountain bike to anything, because it would get stripped down with allen wrenches, but you can build a cool ridgid frame that would be easier to lock and less attractive to theives. As far as a single speed goes you dont need that many gear changes riding in snowy conditions, and you might get stuck in one gear anyway, if your derailler becomes "caked" with ice. I've seen singlespeeds do the trails also (but they gotta be limited on climbing hills) nothing beats a properly built suspension bike, unless you ride in the snow. Ridgid frames make an excellent second choice.
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Old 12-18-05, 05:17 PM
  #108  
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Old 12-19-05, 04:18 AM
  #109  
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Originally Posted by Feltup
It is as easy as that, if you can find a 95-97 Specialized steel frame. Than buy a Surly 1x1 fork.The only thing that sucks is there are no rear disc tabs. I run Vs in the back and a disc up front. They have semi horizonal drops and there is plenty of room for chain tension adjustment. You don't need a SS hub, just get a spacer kit and a DX or CK cog. I use a XTR hub with a Wheels Man. spacer kit, works perfect. But if you want to buy a pre-built SS I would get a Kona Unit.
Found a '96 Trek 850 (in need of a couple things, but frame & fork are fine) outside the thrift store last Thursday for $5.00. There are older rigid framed bikes out there, just need to keep your eyes open.
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Old 12-19-05, 06:16 AM
  #110  
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Nice find! Does it have semi-horizonal drops? Is it steel?
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Old 12-19-05, 10:55 PM
  #111  
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Originally Posted by Feltup
Nice find! Does it have semi-horizonal drops? Is it steel?
Yes, and yes. I wouldn't have noticed it if the bike I was planning on snagging hadn't had problems. It had no markings on it aside from logos on the grips. I recognized the cable fittings, and saw how light it was. It will probably become my son's eventual replacement for his full suspension Mongoose. I recently bought an 830 (also steel) frame on e-bay, and have been equipping that.
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Old 12-31-05, 02:42 PM
  #112  
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Originally Posted by helvetica
I ride a bridgestone MB-1 not sure what year maybe 89 or 91... bought it new, all orignial execept for the front wheel which was forgot in golden gate park, and saddle but still have original.
Sweet. I had an MB-1 I bought in maybe 88 or 89. And then a year or 2 later bought an MB-Zip (MB-0). I liked the MB-0 frame but prefered the MB-1's XT to the Zip's XC Pro. I miss them both.
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Old 12-31-05, 03:31 PM
  #113  
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Here is my old '92 Cannondale, Beast of the East frame, XT (pre XTR), grafton cranks (still using them now)..about 20lbs. I really wish I still had it.
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