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Putting a vintage Specialized Hardrock on a diet?!

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Putting a vintage Specialized Hardrock on a diet?!

Old 07-17-10, 11:00 PM
  #1  
Ludeykrus
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Putting a vintage Specialized Hardrock on a diet?!

So I'm financially challenged. Damn economy and being a student will do that. I'm a tall, skinny bastard that's been riding an old road bike for a while. I acquired a Trek hybrid that's too small for me, and took it out on some local trails, but it just couldn't hang.

I ended up picking up a cheap '89 Specialized Hardrock from craigslist that I really can't complain about, given its price. However, today I had a large stick jump through my rear wheel at full speed on the trails, snapping the rear derailleur in half, leaving me to lug it through the woods a few miles to get out. Climbing on a 30-something pound bike was already a chore for a skinny new guy, but now I'm motivated to shed some weight.

The bike seems all original, aside from the suspended gel seat which will soon be swapped out. Being a rigid, I figure I should be able to skim some weight off of it fairly easily. Anyone have any suggestions to some (preferably cheap!) ways to put this beast on a diet? Say, an older lighter rigid fork to swap on or the likes?





Hopefully, pretty soon I'll tear it apart and weigh the original components to see what I'm working with.
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Old 07-18-10, 06:14 AM
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Once you replace the heavy steel parts (frame, crank with steel chainrings, saddle/seatpost, handlebar etc..) you'll be off to a good start.
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Old 07-18-10, 11:01 AM
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I don't have any advice except to say that I had a similar vintage hardrock that I loved. I still have it actually, but the rear triangle broke. I rode it for a while as a mountain bike when it was new, then put some slicks on it and made a commuter out of it. My advice is just ride it, don't worry about the weight, you'll get stronger. I doubt it's really 30 pounds.
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Old 07-18-10, 11:05 AM
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Thread with picture of my old hardrock
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Old 07-18-10, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by z90 View Post
I doubt it's really 30 pounds.
You're right. It's 32 pounds without bottle, according to my scale ;-)
The same scale says my Prelude weighs 23-24 lbs, which is about on the money.

32 pounds is simply too much for a non-suspension bike.!
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Old 07-18-10, 02:55 PM
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Get rid of the reflectors on the wheels.

If the frame is heavy for a frame, i wouldn't bother upgrading. You can have plenty of fun on a heavy bike. You might be a wuss now, but you'll toughen up. Once you have some money, then you can upgrade.
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Old 07-18-10, 03:16 PM
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Just ride it. It may not be light, but it's a great bike.
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Old 07-18-10, 09:09 PM
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look into a suspension stem. very nifty and lighter then a suspension fork
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Old 07-19-10, 07:28 AM
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^^But also $250. Kinda pricey to put on a bike that's probably worth $50.
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Old 07-10-16, 06:35 PM
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Hard Rock to Single Gear Retro

Just completed a major overhaul on a retro family Hard Rock from the early 90's. Used new Raleigh XLR parts and went single gear. Love the bike before, love it even more now. Had it powder coated down near Aldershot way by Aurora. Fantastic job.

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Old 07-11-16, 08:38 AM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by Ludeykrus View Post
So I'm financially challenged. Damn economy and being a student will do that. I'm a tall, skinny bastard that's been riding an old road bike for a while. I acquired a Trek hybrid that's too small for me, and took it out on some local trails, but it just couldn't hang.

I ended up picking up a cheap '89 Specialized Hardrock from craigslist that I really can't complain about, given its price. However, today I had a large stick jump through my rear wheel at full speed on the trails, snapping the rear derailleur in half, leaving me to lug it through the woods a few miles to get out. Climbing on a 30-something pound bike was already a chore for a skinny new guy, but now I'm motivated to shed some weight.

The bike seems all original, aside from the suspended gel seat which will soon be swapped out. Being a rigid, I figure I should be able to skim some weight off of it fairly easily. Anyone have any suggestions to some (preferably cheap!) ways to put this beast on a diet? Say, an older lighter rigid fork to swap on or the likes?





Hopefully, pretty soon I'll tear it apart and weigh the original components to see what I'm working with.
Foldable tires. Always foldable tires first. Go narrower / treadless if not going offroad.

There is nothing on that bike that is lightweight so every single part can be replaced for a lighter one. So 30 lbs with a normal saddle, not that sofa

Going new parts, a quick two lbs can be shed via hollowtech ii cranks and Al seatpost and bars. Deore or SLX triple cranksets are cheap and shift much better. Or run a 1x and drop a bit more. If you stay with square taper, look for hollow spindle BBs. It appears that S is making them again and the price difference is negligible. Wheels are next but can be pricey. A modern U brake can take about 100 grams off, Shimano's U brakes are monstrosities. Since new parts - even cheap ones, add up fast; I would prioritize the heaviest items that would lose the most weight with new parts.

A good source of cheap nicer parts would be to pick up a used donor bike, since nice MTBs go for about 100 bucks. Here, I would be looking at wheel quality and condition more than anything else. Looking for a parts bike means you can look at sizes that don't fit, but if you find one with nicer parts that fits, it will make more sense to just ride the new bike since it will likely have a nicer frame also

This bike can cost a fortune to get truly lightweight with new parts but I think you can get it close to 25-26lbs for a reasonable amount of money if you buy or already have nice used parts.

TLDR: buy a lighter used bike
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Old 07-11-16, 11:41 AM
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This was a 6 year old thread.....
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Old 07-11-16, 12:07 PM
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Originally Posted by nashvillebill View Post
This was a 6 year old thread.....
YEs-- could almost be stickied as a warning though to folks with entry level bikes to just ride them --- the guy could have spent $700 on new parts only to end up with a bike that still weighed - 27.5 / 28.5 pounds ?

False economy to spend much money on these old beaters outside of things like consumables and maintenance costs that any machine would need

Decent tires is a given, but I wouldn't put $75 race treads on this one -- fresh chain and freewheel, good chainrings can be had cheap from online sources
Fresh grease in hubs, bottom bracket, headset etc. - keep the wheels true - premium brake pads don't cost a lot
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Old 07-13-16, 08:04 AM
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LoLoL

Last edited by osco53; 11-29-16 at 06:33 AM.
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