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anybody ride a HT with a gusseted frame? I'd like pics...

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anybody ride a HT with a gusseted frame? I'd like pics...

Old 10-15-04, 10:32 PM
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jeff williams
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As I may get some welded onto my frame.

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=69808 Are a nice design, I may do these and run suspension.

I like to see rear triangle that have been done for drive torque?
and ANYTHING related to the BB and dominant leg bracing. I've only seen one of those, on my friends custom DH from the late 90's.

Pics, gusseting ideas, web pages if you've ever come across them, I will do some research, like to see how bike makers have implemented them.

Thanks.

And thankyou again Dave..

This a piece written by Dave Moulton, former bike buider, member:

By all means experiment with gussets in a frame, but think long and hard about what you wish to achieve. Often all you do when you strengthen a frame in one place, you weaken it somewhere else.

In the early days of frame building around the turn of the last century; frame lugs were heavy cast steel; nothing more than crude pipe fittings. As tubing manufacturers made tubes thinner wall and therefore lighter, frame builders found that frames would break at the edge of the lug. The lug was way too strong for the tube.

The answer was to in effect weaken the lug by filing it down to make it taper to a fine edge, and to sculpt the lug into intricate lacey patterns. Later pressed steel lugs made this unnecessary. We always think the main object when we build a frame is to make it as stiff as possible, but really it is a delicate balance between stiffness and flexibility.

A palm tree will survive a hurricane whereas other trees bigger and stronger will get their limbs ripped off. A good steel frame is like a very stiff spring; stiff but with just enough flexibility. Aluminum and carbon fiber frames do not have this asset.

On my 1985 MTB I left out the chainstay bridge, an old cyclo-cross trick so that mud will not collect but rather drop through between the chainstays. Often if you leave this bridge out; with the constant sideways flexing the bottom bracket shell will crack. So to compensate I took a piece of seatstay tube; 5/8 in dia. And about 5 inches long. I placed it diagonally from the seat tube; just below the front derailleur; to the left chainstay (Opposite the drive side.) just in front of the rear wheel.

This really stiffened up the bottom bracket area of the frame, but because I had done so with a tube rather than a solid steel gusset this tube had the same strength and flexibility as the rest of the frame. Also the tube was mitered to fit the other tubes so the brazing area was spread out. (Sorry I donít have a picture.)

To sum up; if you are considering gussets: Donít make them too stiff, in other words way stronger than the rest of the frame. And spread the area where the gusset attaches to the frame.


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Old 10-15-04, 10:46 PM
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Look in the area of the headtube.
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Old 10-15-04, 10:57 PM
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Is that joining or gusseting? Well it looks hella strong anyway!

I am thinking to use a design like this for the headtube, maybe do some more fancy cutouts with diamond files.
The frame is Chromoly so the post production welding should be little problem...?
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Old 10-15-04, 11:02 PM
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The Kona Clump tubing at the headtube has an integrated headtube.
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Old 10-15-04, 11:24 PM
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But K, I have this to work with, I'm NEVER going to get it slack like that bike unless I had the tubes cut, ground to a new angle, and a masterful brazer spend fat time...( really nice bike, I almost got an old Cinder Kone, missed, thought it might be worth a retrofit.)
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Old 10-16-04, 06:51 AM
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Go to the Santacruz website and look at the VP Free, it has a pretty sweet headtube setup. It maybe difficult to duplicate it, but it would give you more ideas. Also the Blur4x is worth a look. Be careful with something too exotic if your welding though, the extra heat will make the metal brittle.
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Old 10-16-04, 11:02 AM
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http://www.santacruzbikes.co.uk/ That's pretty nicely done, the small opening the seattube gusset is sweet. I'm doing Chromoly, I think the style like on this bike might interfere with the flex, it seems as more of a brace 'tween the tubes, rather than to the headset tube on the Craftsworks.
Hmmmm, I thing i intend to to try and do is find the exact Chromoly to try and keep some tensile strength in the joins.

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