Mountain Biking Mountain biking is one of the fastest growing sports in the world. Check out this forum to discuss the latest tips, tricks, gear and equipment in the world of mountain biking.

Drops...help

Reply

Old 01-02-05, 10:35 AM
  #1  
trekdude05
Riding trek for life
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Drops...help

Hey to all who want to help,

I want to start doing drops more. Like I can do maybe a one footer now without thinking I'm gonna die. I just got times for Christmas. I love em on the trail but will i get myself killed if I try to get bigger on a drop. I'm looking to build myself up to like 5 or 6 feet at some point.

Any advice?

Thanks

Matt
trekdude05 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 10:39 AM
  #2  
seely
The Rabbi
 
seely's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 5,125
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Okay first, don't use clipless for doing drops, if you value your ankles. Second, do you have a bike that can handle a 5-6 foot drop?
seely is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 10:46 AM
  #3  
trekdude05
Riding trek for life
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have a trek 4500 right now. I plan on buying a fuel 90 in the next couple of months. I thought i could use clipless on short drops.

I dunno

Matt
trekdude05 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 10:48 AM
  #4  
seely
The Rabbi
 
seely's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 5,125
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Clipless are fine if you are trailriding and come to the occasional drop on the trail, but for just going out and dropping off ledges and walls its a very, very, very bad idea, and so is doing drops on a Fuel 90.
seely is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 10:49 AM
  #5  
trekdude05
Riding trek for life
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
so what should i get? i wanna have a bike with a set-up that i can ride XC yet hit a 5 or 6 foot drop if i wanted to without getting myself killed
trekdude05 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 11:28 AM
  #6  
matheprat
Senior Member
 
matheprat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 221
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Learning to do drops takes time. As does everything. Don't assume that you will pick it up easilly. 6ft is a long way.
Also, don't assume you can get one perfect bike for everything. Different bikes excell at different things. If you want to start jumping and doing drops, the bike will be less suited to cross country.
I'd say have a look at some high quality hardtails, before full-sus.
matheprat is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 11:48 AM
  #7  
trekdude05
Riding trek for life
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I know there isn't a perfect bike for everything. I have a trek 4500 now. Could i throw a better shock on the front and some tougher parts on it all together?

I want to get better at riding, and one of the big things for me is that I come to steep slopes or small drops and I get nervous. I want to have some confidence when i ride that stuff.

I dunno if I came across wrong in the beginning, but that is what I am looking for
trekdude05 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 12:17 PM
  #8  
bikered
bikerEd
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 127
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sounds like you want to get into freeriding, but still have a bike with the capabilities to do xc. Depending on how much money you are willing to spend, have a look at the freeride hardtail sticky. Aim for a hardtail as skills will be easier to learn with no rear squish, and you will naturally become smoother when you then get full sus.
Upgrading your trek is probably not a good idea as:
-the frame is an xc frame and NOT designed for jumping
-the frame is likely not to be able to take more than 100mm travel, not very much to drop 6 feet on

You would be far better off spending the money on something with a light frame but with plenty of strength. The Cannondale Chase series are good bets, they won't break unless you abuse them and are pretty light, (the chase 2 weighs 3.5 pounds at 449-ish). I recently got lucky when buying a bike for roughly the same purposes as you - managed to get a custom azonic DS-1, it's very pedallable, but confidence-inspiring on drops/jumps
bikered is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 12:26 PM
  #9  
seely
The Rabbi
 
seely's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 5,125
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
For a full suspension capable of light freeride, check out the Speciaized Enduro. Its pretty tough but still around 30lbs.
seely is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 03:56 PM
  #10  
mtnbiker66
Old School Rad
 
mtnbiker66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: The old Mountains
Posts: 8,212

Bikes: Blur LT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by seely
Okay first, don't use clipless for doing drops, if you value your ankles. Second, do you have a bike that can handle a 5-6 foot drop?
I use clipless in most of my riding I only run platforms when I ride street. When I'm out riding on the trail and want to play around on drops I don't change my pedals. I have more control when clipped in.I've done some 8 & 10 footers while clipped in. When I ride street on sketchy walls and stairs I run platforms so if I have to bail I can. It's different for everyone. By the way seely, how big do you go? I think you are very smart when it comes to bikes but don't you ride xc?
__________________
Like a circus monkey on a stolen Harley......
mtnbiker66 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 04:05 PM
  #11  
mtbikerinpa
Shimano Certified
 
mtbikerinpa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: PA
Posts: 1,839

Bikes: 92 Giant Sedona ATX Custom

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
I ride XC mostly but my bfs always end up freeriding , so I picked up some. I started with Flat pedals(beartraps) and I think for flats you need really aggressive teeth on them. But I dont like them anymore because I had a few shin incidents, one of which left a nasty 3 inch gash mid shin. Good tomboy crash points, but still. I use 545 which are flats which clip in the middle, a compromise of sorts but I have yet to crash due to them(I crash plenty but its just crashing). When I first got into racing my predominant crash was the Endo, and I never had a single ankle prob from being clipped. In fact they reduced my endos to a large extent because my feet were attached to controling points.

Suffice to say, there is middle ground on the clip/no debate. Whatever the system is you conclude, practice it and take small steps to reach the big jumps. Dont expect to master them fast(kudos if you can) but be confident at each level before moving on.
mtbikerinpa is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 04:13 PM
  #12  
Maelstrom 
Wood Licker
 
Maelstrom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Whistler,BC
Posts: 16,966

Bikes: Trek Fuel EX 8 27.5 +, 2002 Transition Dirtbag, Kona Roast 2002

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
I understand why the recomendation to not use clipless. When I am doing drops I ride with my arch on the pedal to ensure I don't snap my ankle (I did a 7footer once with my foot in pedal position on the ball, thought I was gonna snap my ankle, damn having big feet). However are there not clipless you can adjust a little more than others? I would assume dh specific cleats maybe? Or those big mountain bike clipless pedals?

Now for some advice. Drop everything. You need to get confident knowing you can get that front end up any time all the time. Drop the curb big or small. Find anything and everything to drop off. Change up the speed and change the way you drop. Pedal kick drop, speed drop, slow manual drop. Get really confident. Moving your way up in the number.

Also don't look down. Most people mess up the drop because they look where they are dropping too, look in front of the landing area. You will natually keep your body more upright keeping the front of the bike high.

Learn to crash. In fact crash often. Learn to enjoy it. It builds you tumbling skills so you don't stick out a weak arm to brace yourself. Gets you ready to land on your back flat or roll.

All of the above, build confidence to really start going big. Keep in mind, 5 ft really isn't that big. How many times were you play fighting with friends and someone would body slam you (for example)...thats pretty high, didn't kill you. Or play on the monkey bars and falling. Keep the bike level and your body loose and 5ft is butta....
Maelstrom is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 04:26 PM
  #13  
notfred
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 1,169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Ride with someone better than you and try to keep up, you won't have time to slow down and be scared, you'll just have to ride through everything he does.
notfred is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 05:35 PM
  #14  
seely
The Rabbi
 
seely's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 5,125
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Originally Posted by mtnbiker66
I use clipless in most of my riding I only run platforms when I ride street. When I'm out riding on the trail and want to play around on drops I don't change my pedals. I have more control when clipped in.I've done some 8 & 10 footers while clipped in. When I ride street on sketchy walls and stairs I run platforms so if I have to bail I can. It's different for everyone. By the way seely, how big do you go? I think you are very smart when it comes to bikes but don't you ride xc?
Yeah I'm mostly XC but I used to be all about hucking staircases and stuff, when I had a bike that would withstand that. Most of my FR/Urban/DJ knowledge is secondhand from the friends I live vicariously through I should have qualified my statement about clipless... I think its a bad idea for a newb to be doing drops with clipless... for someone who is confident in their abilities and knows what they are doing, who am I to say not to use clipless if its working for them!
seely is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 06:01 PM
  #15  
mtnbiker66
Old School Rad
 
mtnbiker66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: The old Mountains
Posts: 8,212

Bikes: Blur LT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by seely
Yeah I'm mostly XC but I used to be all about hucking staircases and stuff, when I had a bike that would withstand that. Most of my FR/Urban/DJ knowledge is secondhand from the friends I live vicariously through I should have qualified my statement about clipless... I think its a bad idea for a newb to be doing drops with clipless... for someone who is confident in their abilities and knows what they are doing, who am I to say not to use clipless if its working for them!
Fer sure, I was just jokin' with ya anyway.I have some friends with mad skills on bikes, going huge.I wish I was half that good. The main thing is to start small and work your way to bigger stuff.
__________________
Like a circus monkey on a stolen Harley......
mtnbiker66 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 06:18 PM
  #16  
Violineb
Senior Member
 
Violineb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Baltimore/Bloomington, IN
Posts: 67

Bikes: CAAD9 with upgrades

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Try riding down stairs. At first I was dead scarred and only went down very gradual stairs but eventually I was able to do the steeper stuff. Then try riding a bit to fast and jump off the top of the stair case. Or on second thought you might end up doing and endo and breaking something. But that's how I got over some of my fear and I can do 3 foot drops off stairs now without thinking twice. I too have decided to upgrade the pedals of my 4100 and couldn't decide between Time Zs or Azonic Xtensions. I finally went for the Xtensions because of all the ice in Iceland. I actually slipped and fell down 4 or 5 times and an equal amount of times I was able to jump off before I went down with the bike so platforms have a clear advantage in that case. I haven't yet gotten the Xtensions in the mail yet but they look pretty sturdy and have gotten good reviews.
Violineb is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 09:31 PM
  #17  
FISH_FISH
the man behind the camera
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: australia
Posts: 61

Bikes: avanti montari disc comp. series

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i saw in a shop the other day the pedals that had the clips on one side and the flip them over and u can u sed them with skate shoes if u want, but point being you can have your foot futher along the pedal so u don't snap your ankle, and then put them back in after, easy, about 180 aussie
FISH_FISH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 09:33 PM
  #18  
FISH_FISH
the man behind the camera
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: australia
Posts: 61

Bikes: avanti montari disc comp. series

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
ive gone down stairs in my slip/slide in things (u no the ones that go over the shoe) whatever u call them, and i have absolutely no fear of staircases at all, eg a 40 step one won't worry me a bit, but over a 1 ft drop feet out of the clips
FISH_FISH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 09:35 PM
  #19  
Maelstrom 
Wood Licker
 
Maelstrom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Whistler,BC
Posts: 16,966

Bikes: Trek Fuel EX 8 27.5 +, 2002 Transition Dirtbag, Kona Roast 2002

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Please complete your words.

U=YOU...

I can barely read post 17.

thanks
Maelstrom
Maelstrom is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 10:17 PM
  #20  
hebrew_rider
a badass heeb on wheels
 
hebrew_rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Santa Cruz, California
Posts: 219

Bikes: Santa Cruz Chameleon

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
my advice: pull up, keep the front end up untill you hit the ground, relax
hebrew_rider is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-05, 10:21 PM
  #21  
PanPanX
Ride On!!
 
PanPanX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Temple City, CA
Posts: 467

Bikes: 2004 OCR3, 1989 Nishiki Sport, 2003 Kona Blast, 2007 Fuji Track

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
for a bike, i would recommend you get the Specialized Hardrock.
PanPanX is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-05, 12:14 AM
  #22  
mtbikerinpa
Shimano Certified
 
mtbikerinpa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: PA
Posts: 1,839

Bikes: 92 Giant Sedona ATX Custom

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
I thought about using those "half" clips but I dont like the idea of having the chance of getting the 'wrong' side. The DH variations like the 545s have clips on both sides and flats on both, not at all a problem to grip if you dont want to clip.
mtbikerinpa is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service