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Bike for Heavier Weight Rider

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Bike for Heavier Weight Rider

Old 01-03-05, 12:30 PM
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mfenske
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Bike for Heavier Weight Rider

Hey all. I am wondering if anyone could recommend a bike and or fork for a rider who is heavier. I am 6'5" and weigh about 240 (bodybuilding is my other hobby). The guy at the local bike store recommended an RST Gila 100mm on a Specialized Hardrock. I don't need a hardcore bike just something I can singletrack on and ride to work if I choose to. Thanks. Mark
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Old 01-03-05, 12:34 PM
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Welcome to the forums. At 240 that fork will not be very good for you. You will honestly need to look for something stiff and that can take extra stiff springs (which you will need for your size) If this was purely a commuter bike it wouldn't matter, but if you intend to take this on trails you will need a fork that can support your size and react consistently.

I can't really recommend anything myself as I don't know much about that range of forks specifically, just warning you that that fork will not be adequate for someone your size on a single track

Welcome to the forums.
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Old 01-03-05, 12:42 PM
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Thanks for the welcome. I've done some searching already (I hate newbies that don't) and really couldn't find anything either. Thanks for your response. Mark
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Old 01-03-05, 12:45 PM
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Well I am in your size range. But the forks I would recommend are in the 200$ to 300$ range which, by the bike you are buying, you are not that interested in purchasing at this point (warning mountain biking is addictive as working out, it really works the shoulders if you start riding tech stuff)

If you listed a price range you are interested in spending it would help. Keep in mind, what you do may not be hardcore but bikes are designed around 5'6 to 5'7 pinners so you need slightly burlier stuff unfortunately

BTW do you compete or just a gym rat? (I weightlifted consistently for 8 years but quit because whistler sucks for real gyms)
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Old 01-03-05, 12:46 PM
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There were some posts by guys about your size on this recent thread. It might give you some ideas.

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=80891
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Old 01-03-05, 12:52 PM
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The Kona puts the Marzocchi Dirt Jam Pro on their Hoss series (made for big riders). You might check out some reviews of that.
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Old 01-03-05, 12:54 PM
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Maybe the Kona hoss? Excellent bike for the bigger rider, and good on the singletrack too... Kona made this range for teller people over 6 foot, but they found out its pretty for bigger epople around your weight, the bike sounds perfect for you, but it depends how much money your willing to spend
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Old 01-03-05, 01:01 PM
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6'5", 245lbs, I went with the Manitou Black Super Air, as it provided a adjustable air chamber that I could inflate to my preference, got a 03 at greenfishsports.com, check them out.
Great prices.
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Old 01-03-05, 01:09 PM
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Well, right now I don't want to spend much more than about $500. Anyone know if there is a Kona dealer in WI? Thanks again guys. Mark
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Old 01-03-05, 01:31 PM
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http://www.konaworld.com/shopping_ca...x?countryid=19

Dealer searcher.
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Old 01-03-05, 01:33 PM
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Check this out: http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=58652

The Hardrock is a great solid bike. Everything on it should hold up well. The weak point is the fork. You have to realize that most manufacturers spec their bikes with a 160 to 180 lb rider in mind. There are things you can modify without breaking the bank, and with a $500 budget you should be able to make the bike work for you.

Another option might be a used bike. One with a higher quality fork that you can swap the springs out of.

Step back. There are three types of suspension forks. The cheapest and least technological is an elastomer sprung (think pogo stick) the inside of the fork has a hard rubber elastomer that compresses and rebounds as the fork cycles through it's travel. These are your cheap forks and usually only have a preload adjustment. You can get a stiffer elastomer, but there is NO rebound damping. Meaning the fork will bounce back as fast as you compress it. Again, think a pogo stick.

From there there is a coil sprung fork. The inside of the fork has a wound coil spring and usually sits in an oil bath. These forks can be simple with just a preload, and can go all the way up to 5 or 6 different adjustments. For heavier riders these are the way to go. You can set the preload and the rebound damping (you can slow down the spring back). Some will even have a compression damping cartridge. You're looking at about $250 to $300 for the fork alone (at closeout prices!). A good fork is in my opinion one of the most critical pieces of equipment.

After that, there is an air sprung fork. Instead of using a mechanical device such as an elastomer or a spring, the fork (or suspension) utilizes the compression of air to act as the suspension. As the fork cycles through it's travel, the air chamber volume is decreased and the pressure increases. Simple yet effective. There are also combinations of air/oil and air/oil on one side and coil spring/oil on the other. The advantage to an air sprung suspension is the reduction of weight. The drawback is mostly for Clydesdales is that you are usually working in the upper range of pressure for the suspension. The o-rings and seals can only sustain so much pressure before they blow. The technology has improved, but still you're just waiting for an air sprung suspension to blow. (again, my opinion).

I would consider getting the Hardrock and asking the bike shop to swap out the fork for a coil sprung fork before you ever take delivery of the bike. That or go ahead and buy the bike as is and buy a new fork on closeout and do the swap and sell the old fork on ebay or something. Figure the RST is probably only worth about $60.00.

MSRP on the Hardrock is $350, new fork $250 (hopefully a good deal on closeout), minus the $50 or $60 for the RST and you're looking at $550 for a great bike!
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Old 01-03-05, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by a2psyklnut
Check this out: http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=58652

The Hardrock is a great solid bike. Everything on it should hold up well. The weak point is the fork. You have to realize that most manufacturers spec their bikes with a 160 to 180 lb rider in mind. There are things you can modify without breaking the bank, and with a $500 budget you should be able to make the bike work for you.

Another option might be a used bike. One with a higher quality fork that you can swap the springs out of.

Step back. There are three types of suspension forks. The cheapest and least technological is an elastomer sprung (think pogo stick) the inside of the fork has a hard rubber elastomer that compresses and rebounds as the fork cycles through it's travel. These are your cheap forks and usually only have a preload adjustment. You can get a stiffer elastomer, but there is NO rebound damping. Meaning the fork will bounce back as fast as you compress it. Again, think a pogo stick.

From there there is a coil sprung fork. The inside of the fork has a wound coil spring and usually sits in an oil bath. These forks can be simple with just a preload, and can go all the way up to 5 or 6 different adjustments. For heavier riders these are the way to go. You can set the preload and the rebound damping (you can slow down the spring back). Some will even have a compression damping cartridge. You're looking at about $250 to $300 for the fork alone (at closeout prices!). A good fork is in my opinion one of the most critical pieces of equipment.

After that, there is an air sprung fork. Instead of using a mechanical device such as an elastomer or a spring, the fork (or suspension) utilizes the compression of air to act as the suspension. As the fork cycles through it's travel, the air chamber volume is decreased and the pressure increases. Simple yet effective. There are also combinations of air/oil and air/oil on one side and coil spring/oil on the other. The advantage to an air sprung suspension is the reduction of weight. The drawback is mostly for Clydesdales is that you are usually working in the upper range of pressure for the suspension. The o-rings and seals can only sustain so much pressure before they blow. The technology has improved, but still you're just waiting for an air sprung suspension to blow. (again, my opinion).

I would consider getting the Hardrock and asking the bike shop to swap out the fork for a coil sprung fork before you ever take delivery of the bike. That or go ahead and buy the bike as is and buy a new fork on closeout and do the swap and sell the old fork on ebay or something. Figure the RST is probably only worth about $60.00.

MSRP on the Hardrock is $350, new fork $250 (hopefully a good deal on closeout), minus the $50 or $60 for the RST and you're looking at $550 for a great bike!
Wow! Thanks. The other bike that the guys are recommending is the Kona Hoss. It's more than I wanna spend but it looks like it might be the ticket. Wifey wouldn't be too happy about it but I spose in the long run it'd be cheaper than fixing a bike made for little guys all the time. Mark
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Old 01-03-05, 01:58 PM
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The Kona HOSS is a great bike. I hope more manufacturer's will follow Kona's lead and design bikes for heavier riders. Kona has designed the bike from the ground up with the realization that a lot of us are NOT skinny little guys. A better fork, a beefier frame, stronger wheels...etc. It really just makes sense.

Yeah, it's more expensive, but it's a great spec. It's a bike that should last you for years without having to do anything except regular maintenance.

Also, stay away from cheap full suspension bikes. I know there is a strong appeal to go full suspension, but cheap full suspension will make you hate riding. Cheap is < $1,000 (for lightweight guys) for Clydesdales cheap is < $1,400.00.

Plus, riding a hardtail will make you a better rider in the long run.
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Old 01-03-05, 02:25 PM
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I guess I'll just have to save longer. I have gotten used to paying more for things in my size. Try finding a suit in a 48-50" extra long with a flat fronted 35-36" pant. Guess that's my punishment for wanting to improve my physique. Thanks again. Mark
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Old 01-03-05, 03:13 PM
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Originally Posted by mfenske
I guess I'll just have to save longer. I have gotten used to paying more for things in my size. Try finding a suit in a 48-50" extra long with a flat fronted 35-36" pant. Guess that's my punishment for wanting to improve my physique. Thanks again. Mark
hah, yea, I think its funny that a 42 jacket always seems to come with a 36 inch waist or the 32 inch suits with a 38 jacket. I want a job where I either dont have to wear a suit or just make enough money to get one tailored.

anyway, back on topic there's a guy on this board that is in the high 300s I believe (sorry if the figure is wrong, man). do a search for posts by PWRDbyTRD. he's got a hoss, and it seems to be holding up.
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Old 01-03-05, 03:27 PM
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I've got a friend who is well over 300 lbs and he has bent several standard frames just from the weight. He's got a Kona Hoss on order and I doubt he'll bend that (we'll see). The Hoss looks like a heck of a lot of bike for $800.
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Old 01-03-05, 03:33 PM
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A few years ago I got my mate into mountain biking. 220lbs and 6'4" of a lot of overweight potential. He got a cheap giant, solely for the write up on the frame with the realisation that parts would wear out very quickly with the punishment that he was going to give it. Within 18 months the only parts of the original bike left were the frame, the seat post, the handlebars and the stem. Ok it was a cheap bike to start with, and his weight did not help much but this has been an expensive way to get into mountain biking. He still rides the frame, but he is looking at the hoss very strongly, and that is due to Kona's reputation, and the way the hoss is specced.
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Old 01-03-05, 03:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Juniper
I've got a friend who is well over 300 lbs and he has bent several standard frames just from the weight. He's got a Kona Hoss on order and I doubt he'll bend that (we'll see). The Hoss looks like a heck of a lot of bike for $800.

you could probably find one for cheasper than 800, and yeah it seems like one hell of a bike for that much.
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Old 01-03-05, 09:51 PM
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I'm 6'3" and 215 (was 206 before the holidays)... and I went through the same thing. I bought a cheaper FS bike, and sure enough, within a year, I had replaced everything but the stem and handlebars. My current ride, a 02' Jamis Dakar, was built up with the parts from that first ride. It seems to be doing great...

Anyways, you can build a 'used' bike, a hardtail, for less than $500 if you have the time and the knowledge. I just finished a GT hardtail (which BTW, is fairly lightweight and plenty stout...my 280lb friend has one) for $350, and for another $100, I could have afforded a nice coil-sprung fork.

Also, if you go coil sprung, GET THE RIGHT SPRINGS...$20 extra bucks can save ya from an endo...

Also, don't overlook materials...although a little heavier, steel is VERY stout. I used to borrow a friend's Schwinn Paramount hardtail, and I loved that ride. It climbed great, but it was really solid when I was railing the downhill sections of the local trails. I still believe this was THE bike that made me faster. It taught me alot about how to react.

Also, don't overlook wheels. Good wheels would be nex in line...

Good luck...
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Old 01-03-05, 09:57 PM
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I ride my hoss and I'm much bigger than you. I love mine and it feels secure...I haven't had much play with any other bikes, but I like mine.
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Old 03-15-05, 03:30 PM
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Found a Brand New 2004 Kona Hoss at Gear N' Up in Neenah, WI for $600. Of course I bought it and take delivery in the next couple weeks (no rack on the car yet). Also picked up a Giant Yukon for $380 for wifey. Can't wait to ride. Mark
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Old 03-15-05, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by mfenske
Found a Brand New 2004 Kona Hoss at Gear N' Up in Neenah, WI for $600. Of course I bought it and take delivery in the next couple weeks (no rack on the car yet). Also picked up a Giant Yukon for $380 for wifey. Can't wait to ride. Mark
go on ahead and tell them to order the stiffer springs or you will be doing plenty of bobbing on that fork. Trust me.
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Old 03-15-05, 04:05 PM
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you should be able to grab a used dirt jumper 3 for under 100 bucks, check ridemonkey.com classifieds, theres a few in there. with the leftover money, get a set of nicer wheels, or get one of the hardrocks with ditch witch rims, those will be ok to start on and are fairly strong, much better than the base hardrock.
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Old 03-15-05, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by btadlock
6'5", 245lbs, I went with the Manitou Black Super Air, as it provided a adjustable air chamber that I could inflate to my preference, got a 03 at greenfishsports.com, check them out.
Great prices.
I have to second the Black. I am 6'5", 250 and have had no problems.
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Old 03-15-05, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by spin02
I have to second the Black. I am 6'5", 250 and have had no problems.
I'm your size and I won't touch a Manipoo. They're way too flexy for my taste
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