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Mountain bike rack?

Old 05-07-13, 10:22 PM
  #1  
Ariel_
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Mountain bike rack?

Hello,

I am really new to mountain biking. I bought my first mountain bike less than one week ago. I have been commuting to work every day for more than one year on an hybrid bike and now want to enjoy riding off road on the weekends.

I wanted to ask a question about accessories.

I have read many articles that advice to use a backpack for watter and for carring tools. I wonder why not using a rack with a small panier or a trunk-stylw bag to carry those things and avoid the extra weight in the back.

I am used to paniers in my commuter bike and would like to understand why this is not a good option for mountain biking.

Thanks a lot!
Ariel
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Old 05-08-13, 02:34 AM
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jimc101
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How much do you intend to carry? Racks aren't normally a good idea on an MTB, as you normally don't carry enough to justify them, they can be heavy, and you can have fit issues, as most modern MTB's aren't designed for them. Your putting weight in a fixed location, where as if it's on your back, it will move where you do.

If you are looking at panniers, you can get a rack from Thule https://www.thule.com/en/gb/products/...-rack-_-100016 a friend has used this for a short 3 day tour, with 2 panniers on the back, on a disc fitted bike, and it worked fine.
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Old 05-08-13, 12:15 PM
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ralph12
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Most mountain bikes are relatively heavy (I know some are much lighter than others), and a rack is a big, heavy thing...mountain bikes with the proper mounts for a rack will tend to be entry-level mountain bikes which are especially heavy even by mountain bike standards.

I used to use a rack on my entry-level Raleigh mountain bike, but really it was so heavy it became barely usable. It felt like pedaling with stones tied to the bike. Your mileage may vary, as they say.
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Old 05-09-13, 12:10 AM
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Thank you very much for your answers!

i was thinking about this rack (and pannier) which fits any bike, and it is light:
https://www.arkel-od.com/us/all-categ...neur-rack.html

i dont think this setup will weight more than one extra water bottle, but I might be wrong...

One of the items I would like to carry is a jacket, as in where I live temperature drops significantly in the evening/morning compared to the rest of the day.

I am not used to use a backpack when I bike, and it seems to me that it may not be very comfortable, but again, this could be simply to the fact that I am new to mountain biking.

Do people agree that backpacks are better than rack+pannier?

Thank you very much!
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Old 05-09-13, 12:39 AM
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Backpack definitely beats rack. You want a hydration pack that holds the weight close to your body, not a big daypack, if that's where the confusion as to extra weight on your back is coming from.
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Old 05-09-13, 09:32 AM
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I have been mountain biking (recreational, site seeing, flowy single track-not a racer) for 20 years. I like the Hydration packs/backpacks for the amount of water you can carry and extras you can pack. Additionally, there are times I want to stash the bike and hike around. A hydration pack goes with me everywhere. My back does get sweaty, but hey-its exercise.

On oe my favorite things to do is ride to remote fishing holes and beaver ponds. You can get an 8 piece fly pole that fits well in a Camelback MULE. Now that is the makings of a fun day.
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Old 05-09-13, 01:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Ariel_ View Post
Do people agree that backpacks are better than rack+pannier?
indubitably
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Old 05-10-13, 10:31 PM
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Thank you all for your feedback!
I will go ahead and get a Camelback.

Thanks,
Ariel
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Old 05-11-13, 04:56 AM
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I prefer racks and panniers or a rack-top bag to backpacks or camelbacks, which are hot and annoying. There's no real reason to avoid a rear rack on a mountain bike unless it has rear suspension and no place to mount the rack.
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Old 05-11-13, 01:36 PM
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Originally Posted by radeln View Post
There's no real reason to avoid a rear rack on a mountain bike unless it has rear suspension and no place to mount the rack.
Yes there is. Weight balance matters.
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Old 05-11-13, 05:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Zephyr11 View Post
Yes there is. Weight balance matters.
To a degree, yes. It depends on the type of riding also, racing is different than recreation. I would rather have that weight low and on the bike, rather than high and on me.
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Old 05-11-13, 08:30 PM
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Originally Posted by radeln View Post
To a degree, yes. It depends on the type of riding also, racing is different than recreation. I would rather have that weight low and on the bike, rather than high and on me.
True, the type of riding matters. For mountain biking, carrying it on your back is far better than a rack on the back of your bike. Considering we're in the mountain bike forum, and the OP stated she wants to ride off-road AND bought a mountain bike because apparently a hybrid won't cut it for whatever she plans on doing with this bike, I think it's safe to assume she's actually going to be mountain biking.
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Old 05-12-13, 08:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Zephyr11 View Post
True, the type of riding matters. For mountain biking, carrying it on your back is far better than a rack on the back of your bike. Considering we're in the mountain bike forum, and the OP stated she wants to ride off-road AND bought a mountain bike because apparently a hybrid won't cut it for whatever she plans on doing with this bike, I think it's safe to assume she's actually going to be mountain biking.
Absolutes are easy, but rare in real life. There is more than one type of mountain biking. There are steep, technical trails, and there is doubletrack, and singletrack, and gravel paths. There are recreational and racing forms, and fast and slow.

For the OP: if you think a pack will work better for you, try it. Maybe it will, although stuffing a jacket in one may be difficult. If it doesn't work out, just realize that whatever type of riding you're doing is not the one true form of mountain biking, and then you're allowed to put a rack on the bike. No one actually out riding will complain either way.
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Old 05-12-13, 03:48 PM
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Originally Posted by radeln View Post
Absolutes are easy, but rare in real life. There is more than one type of mountain biking. There are steep, technical trails, and there is doubletrack, and singletrack, and gravel paths. There are recreational and racing forms, and fast and slow.

For the OP: if you think a pack will work better for you, try it. Maybe it will, although stuffing a jacket in one may be difficult. If it doesn't work out, just realize that whatever type of riding you're doing is not the one true form of mountain biking, and then you're allowed to put a rack on the bike. No one actually out riding will complain either way.
I can't think of one single ride I have been on where I would rather have my weight down low in the rear... even on a relaxed geometry road bike, adding a few pounds can make standing and pedaling dangerous if you forget about the rack. I have never actually seen one out on a trail either... maybe there is a reason why...
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