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What Tired Pressure to Run A full suspension MTB

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What Tired Pressure to Run A full suspension MTB

Old 06-11-13, 03:32 PM
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CanadianBiker32
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What Tired Pressure to Run A full suspension MTB

I am still trying to figure out the best tire pressure for my MTB. its a Full Suspension Rocky Mountain. Element 50

I am very paranoid about getting flats so i run a high tire pressure about 45 to 50 psi for doing trails. Most of the trail in my area have lots of roots and lots of single track. But i am still finding traction problems for going into mud. Tires are really good though good quality.

What tire pressures do you all recommend best for a MTB that is full suspension
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Old 06-11-13, 04:18 PM
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Why are you "very paranoid about getting flats"? Do you not know how to fix one?
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Old 06-11-13, 04:35 PM
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Would look at the side walls and initially go with the lower end of the manufactures recommended pressures; 50psi is a bit high for off road MTB.

You haven't given any info about whether you are running tubes, tubeless (conversion) or tubeless (UST); if you want to run low pressure, with out the risk of pinch flats, tubeless is the way to go, but is cost more. Regardless, you need to know how to fix a flat with the type of setup you are using.

For tires, again, which ones, you can get good quality ones which will excel in the dry, but will be useless in mud, one tire does not fit all conditions
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Old 06-11-13, 05:24 PM
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No easy answer. Lots of trade offs. And I agree with cript - flats are easy to fix and you should be prepared to do it. Higher pressure will not prevent flats. I with between 30 and 50 depending on various factors including how I feel. Do I want a softer ride or traction etc...
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Old 06-11-13, 05:41 PM
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I run more pressure (40-45lbs) on my Full Suspension because I expect my shocks to absorb impact. I also live where the group is pretty hard. I want lower rolling resistance. BUT when I know I am going to hit changing situations or sand and gravelly stuff I use lower pressure (28 in back 30 up front) to grab better. YMMV

A hint I picked up here that helped me out was to push your front tire into turns. Don't lean into the turn, keep a good posture, but put pressure on your grip on the side you are turning into and push your front knobbies into the ground. Seems to work and helps me corner and do switchbacks better. Check out the STICKIE Thread for Techniques New Riders. Tons of good help there.

And yeah, practice changing flats at home. Fixing an old tube without a bucket of water. Its a good skill to have.
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Old 06-12-13, 04:47 AM
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Between OR, IL, and upstate NY, I've never run more than 30psi. 145lb pro xc racer.

Rolling resistance tests have actually shown that grip is lower and rolling resistance is higher at the higher pressure you guys are using.

Tubeless and finding the proper pressure for your tires, weight, and riding conditions is key.
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Old 06-12-13, 06:15 AM
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i use regular tubed tires

I run regular Tubed tires. Traditional tubes the old fashion way. Thats why i run a high pressure
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Old 06-13-13, 07:06 AM
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Originally Posted by CanadianBiker32 View Post
I run regular Tubed tires.
Stop it. Just stop it. You can convert to tubeless relatively inexpensively.

It will change your life.
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Old 06-13-13, 09:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Duke of Kent View Post
Rolling resistance tests have actually shown that grip is lower and rolling resistance is higher at the higher pressure you guys are using.

Tubeless and finding the proper pressure for your tires, weight, and riding conditions is key.
While I agree about grip I am not so sure about 'rolling resistance'. Your statement is very counter-intuitive. Do you have a link to these tests?
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Old 06-15-13, 05:45 AM
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The basic premise is this:

At high pressures, your tires bounce over every imperfection in the trail surface. Your energy is used for UPWARD movement, instead of FORWARD movement.

At lower pressures, your tires are able to deform over trail imperfections (rocks, roots, gravel), so all of your energy goes towards going FORWARD, instead of propelling you over every little bump.

This is just one link, but there are many. If you were to look at WC MTB tires over the years, they've become wider and wider. Dudes aren't running 1.5" tires anymore.

https://www.schwalbetires.com/wider_faster_page
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Old 06-15-13, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Duke of Kent View Post
Between OR, IL, and upstate NY, I've never run more than 30psi. 145lb pro xc racer.

Rolling resistance tests have actually shown that grip is lower and rolling resistance is higher at the higher pressure you guys are using.

Tubeless and finding the proper pressure for your tires, weight, and riding conditions is key.
Originally Posted by Duke of Kent View Post
The basic premise is this:

At high pressures, your tires bounce over every imperfection in the trail surface. Your energy is used for UPWARD movement, instead of FORWARD movement.

At lower pressures, your tires are able to deform over trail imperfections (rocks, roots, gravel), so all of your energy goes towards going FORWARD, instead of propelling you over every little bump.

This is just one link, but there are many. If you were to look at WC MTB tires over the years, they've become wider and wider. Dudes aren't running 1.5" tires anymore.

https://www.schwalbetires.com/wider_faster_page
Yes, grip IS lower -- but rolling resistance will NOT be higher. Neither is tubeless "key" for trail riding. It may well be so for your racing, but racing is not trail riding. The reasons you outline are well known, that higher inflations cause tires to 'bounce' over bumps rather than 'roll' over them. But rolling resistance -- the tendency for a tire to NOT 'want' to roll faster -- is NOT hindered by higher pressures. It's simply a matter of bounce equals less contact with the trail, and less progress as a result. There is and has been some talk about the internal resistance of the tube and tire rubbing against each other, which is rumored to cause some loss...that, I can't say I've experienced. (Maybe if I tested sets of identical tires tubed and tubeless, I'd feel it, but that's not feasible right now.) My tubeless setup a few years ago was sweet, but the tires wore out too quickly, and my replacements didn't take tubeless conversion.
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Old 06-16-13, 07:01 AM
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Originally Posted by CanadianBiker32 View Post
I am still trying to figure out the best tire pressure for my MTB. its a Full Suspension Rocky Mountain. Element 50

I am very paranoid about getting flats so i run a high tire pressure about 45 to 50 psi for doing trails. Most of the trail in my area have lots of roots and lots of single track. But i am still finding traction problems for going into mud. Tires are really good though good quality.

What tire pressures do you all recommend best for a MTB that is full suspension
A lot depends on your weight. Im 170 loaded and typically ride about 20-23 on my FS tubeless. Yesterday I rode at about 25 and my front was bouncing off of rocks in an annoying way.

I dont think I have ever pumped my tires above 35...
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Old 06-19-13, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Duke of Kent View Post
Between OR, IL, and upstate NY, I've never run more than 30psi. 145lb pro xc racer.

Rolling resistance tests have actually shown that grip is lower and rolling resistance is higher at the higher pressure you guys are using.

Tubeless and finding the proper pressure for your tires, weight, and riding conditions is key.
Originally Posted by goodmojo View Post
A lot depends on your weight. Im 170 loaded and typically ride about 20-23 on my FS tubeless. Yesterday I rode at about 25 and my front was bouncing off of rocks in an annoying way.

I dont think I have ever pumped my tires above 35...
Listen to these guys. It's not a game of high pressures. I generally run 20F / 22R on a hardtail with 2.35" tires (with or without tubes). The softer pressures can just soak the bumps up _so_ much better. When you're putting a lot of cornering load on the tire (read pro XC rider), then you need to pump pressures up a little to stop the tire from rolling or to just give a little support to the tire.
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Old 06-19-13, 03:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Duke of Kent View Post
This is just one link, but there are many. If you were to look at WC MTB tires over the years, they've become wider and wider. Dudes aren't running 1.5" tires anymore.

https://www.schwalbetires.com/wider_faster_page
Thanks for the link. I note that they say "Higher pressure was only faster on the road." Since I'm both a road and mountain bike rider I was coming at it from a road rider mind set. Interesting differences.
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Old 06-19-13, 08:53 PM
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As others have said, yeah, that's pretty damn high. Depends on where and what your trails are like, and how you ride them. I run 30psi, give or take a couple depending on how wet/dry things are, and what particular trails. And yes, tubeless is the ****.
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