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Been comparing.

Old 10-05-13, 08:31 PM
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Been comparing.

The rigid and the suspension fork I have. These are my findings for myself based on where I ride and what I'm looking for in a fork and the fact that I tend to like to do some bmx type of stuff as well. Your findings may very well differ from this. Giving pros and cons for each.

Suspension fork pros:

1) More forgiving if you come up a tad short.

2) Line selection isn't as important as with a rigid.

3) Fun factor.


Rigid fork pros:

1) Stiffer.

2) Easier to pump the bike when going on rollers, suspension actually bogs you down some, since it is design soak stuff up.

3) Fun Factor mixed in with lighter weight.

Suspension fork cons:

1) More maintenance.

2) Messes with the geometry of the bike, jacks the front up too much for what I want, I want a low axle to crown height.

3) Makes bike feel unbalanced.

Rigid fork cons:

1) No adjustment available.

2) Nowhere near as forgiving as a suspension fork

3) Line must be spot on.


With that being put up there. Each have their good side and bad side, so for me I am going to have to go with the rigid fork based on the that it is easier to overcome the cons with the rigid simply by tire size and being more diligent in terms of line selection and knowing my limits. I don't like servicing my suspension all that much and am such a stickler with it's performance that I spend about the same amount of time tinkering with the suspension settings as I do riding, where with the rigid, it's check tire pressure and go shred. Not saying that suspension forks are garbage, just that with the dmr it isn't for me.

With that being said, I'll hold onto the suspension fork for when I get around to build a dirt jump specific bike.
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Old 10-05-13, 11:22 PM
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I personally don't agree with your suspension fork cons. Maintenance is slim to none with any of the new forks. Most are bolt on, set sag and rebound, ride and leave. All frames are also designed with a specific fork mm in setting in mind. So yes a suspension fork can mess with the designed geometry if you put a fork on that has to much or too little travel. As far as unbalanced I don't really understand what you are feeling here, unless you haven't really found a setting that work on a suspension for to suit your riding purposes.
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Old 10-06-13, 12:16 AM
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For what Dan's using his bike for (DJ, pump-tracking, urban, etc.) I can see his point. Now I'm an affirmed DJ/BMX hack; I can use all the forgiveness I can get my hands on. My ideal DJ bike would be a Yeti 4-Cross or Transition Double. Forgiveness in the rear too for casing trannies and blowing landings .
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Old 10-06-13, 09:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Triaxtremec View Post
I personally don't agree with your suspension fork cons. Maintenance is slim to none with any of the new forks. Most are bolt on, set sag and rebound, ride and leave. All frames are also designed with a specific fork mm in setting in mind. So yes a suspension fork can mess with the designed geometry if you put a fork on that has to much or too little travel. As far as unbalanced I don't really understand what you are feeling here, unless you haven't really found a setting that work on a suspension for to suit your riding purposes.
The fork I have is in between the recommended travel range for my frame which is 90-120mm of travel, the suspension fork I have is 100mm of travel. In the past I've been on a Marzocchi Z1(130mm) and DJ2(100), Rock Shox Pike Team (95-140mm), Argyle 318(100mm), Fox Vanilla 32 RLC(130), Talas 32 RLC(100-140mm), F100 RLC, F100X, Manitou Black(Air, 100mm), then got the rigid, and not too long ago acquired an RST Space that is set at 100mm. I know how to set my suspension up and have the RST riding great and will be going on a build that has a shorter top tube. But for the dmr, the rigid just feels better with the front being lower mated with a 3" rise bar and is much more balanced weight wise, which is what I meant in my original post..
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Old 10-06-13, 09:48 PM
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I second what Dan has explained. I have a fairly new Sektor and it's been a chore getting the stiction out of it. It's a great fork and it finally works as I want it too, but it's been a journey getting it there. Brand new, it was super impressive, but after a while, it takes some interesting tricks to keep it moving freely on small bumps but not feeling spongy.


That said...rigid is fun. It's predictable. You always know what it's going to feel like, how it will react. You may be getting toward the end of your service life on oil on a suspension fork and all the sudden it sucks. Can be frustrating.


This is why I love both...but have been contemplating the whole "one bike"...and it being a rigid one.

We see.
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Old 10-13-13, 07:30 PM
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Back with the suspension fork. Eying stuff now that I want it over the rigid.
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Old 10-14-13, 07:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Dannihilator View Post
Back with the suspension fork. Eying stuff now that I want it over the rigid.
I take that back. Did better with the rigid.
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Old 10-14-13, 11:25 PM
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Make up your mind.
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Old 10-15-13, 01:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Triaxtremec View Post
I personally don't agree with your suspension fork cons. Maintenance is slim to none with any of the new forks. Most are bolt on, set sag and rebound, ride and leave. All frames are also designed with a specific fork mm in setting in mind. So yes a suspension fork can mess with the designed geometry if you put a fork on that has to much or too little travel. As far as unbalanced I don't really understand what you are feeling here, unless you haven't really found a setting that work on a suspension for to suit your riding purposes.

Ride hard for a year or two and don't do an oil change or anything an get back to us about that.
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Old 10-15-13, 07:41 AM
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Originally Posted by dminor View Post
Make up your mind.
Mind is made.
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Old 10-15-13, 08:45 AM
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Rigid is fun, but unforgiving. If you get off line it will bounce you around like a bull. I remember getting launched into some trees a few times. There is fun in spinning through the air like a helicopter blade.
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Old 10-15-13, 09:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Daspydyr View Post
Rigid is fun, but unforgiving. If you get off line it will bounce you around like a bull. I remember getting launched into some trees a few times. There is fun in spinning through the air like a helicopter blade.
Actually, jumping on the rigid is actually easier on my right arm/shoulder, ever since blowing my trapezious muscle in my right shoulder last year suspension has felt like it was trying to pull at my shoulder. The after effect from a couple of months ago hasn't helped.
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Old 10-15-13, 10:50 PM
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Suspension is nice when you need a softer ride and control. But it is a sponge when it comes to absorbing energy. I like my lockouts, but still get the pogo bounce climbing.
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Old 10-17-13, 11:22 AM
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For how flat the majority of the trails around here are (in terms of bumpiness, not altitude change), I'm kind of bummed that I destroyed the rim on the rigid Wahoo the first day I had it back. Especially with the XCT being such a supple bike for XC, I end up using it mostly for urban riding. In the distant future when I have any spare money at all, I think some wider bars & decent wheels/tires would make the Wahoo a better choice for most of the local trails.
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