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Tires for Tubless??

Old 02-09-15, 01:22 PM
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Tires for Tubless??

I need advice on what tires are best for going tubelss on 29er wheels and why?

Also, is this something I should just have the bikeshop do for the first time?

TIA!!
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Old 02-09-15, 01:23 PM
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I typoed tubeless
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Old 02-09-15, 02:00 PM
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Most tires can be converted to tubeless relatively easily. Tubeless-ready tires will obviously be best. My LBS charged me $50 labor to convert my wheels. You can certainly do it yourself, but between needing to get rim strip properly installed I figured it wasn't worth my time. Depends a lot on how much a mechanic you are and what you value your time at.
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Old 02-09-15, 02:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Makel View Post
Also, is this something I should just have the bikeshop do for the first time?

TIA!!
Modify the wheels for tubeless? Maybe, it depends on your comfort level.

Mount and fill the tires? Absolutely not, your LBS isn't going to be out on the trails to help when you have problems.
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Old 02-09-15, 02:34 PM
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DIY tubeless is not that hard if you have a compressor, but it definitely can be a frustrating learning curve.

What is your bike or wheels (if you replaced them)? If you have a tubeless-ready wheel and tubeless tire, it often is pretty dang easy: install one bead of the tire completely, install the other bead 80%, pour in sealant, finish installing tire, lay it flat on its side and start pumping.

If that doesn't work, generally you need a compressor.


...
Regarding which specific tires to use tubeless, what are your riding conditions? What kind of tires are you using now and how do you like them?
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Old 02-09-15, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by ColinL View Post
DIY tubeless is not that hard if you have a compressor, but it definitely can be a frustrating learning curve.

What is your bike or wheels (if you replaced them)? If you have a tubeless-ready wheel and tubeless tire, it often is pretty dang easy: install one bead of the tire completely, install the other bead 80%, pour in sealant, finish installing tire, lay it flat on its side and start pumping.

If that doesn't work, generally you need a compressor.


...
Regarding which specific tires to use tubeless, what are your riding conditions? What kind of tires are you using now and how do you like them?
Off the top of my head I don't know, they are the cheapy specialized ones though. This is for my husbands bike, we just bought him a rockhopper 29er. I'm pretty sure we have to buy new tires. They will mostly be ridden on red dirt and a little sand, and or a little mud. He did say his back tire was sliding around a lot on Sunday, it was dry and pretty smooth dirt, so he will need tires with a better grip.
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Old 02-09-15, 03:23 PM
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Originally Posted by gsa103 View Post
Most tires can be converted to tubeless relatively easily. Tubeless-ready tires will obviously be best. My LBS charged me $50 labor to convert my wheels. You can certainly do it yourself, but between needing to get rim strip properly installed I figured it wasn't worth my time. Depends a lot on how much a mechanic you are and what you value your time at.
Originally Posted by Phlorida View Post
Modify the wheels for tubeless? Maybe, it depends on your comfort level.

Mount and fill the tires? Absolutely not, your LBS isn't going to be out on the trails to help when you have problems.
I will watch some youtubes and see what it looks like.
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Old 02-09-15, 04:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Makel View Post
I will watch some youtubes and see what it looks like.
You will be telling us how to do it in no time. NoTubes Support Center
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Old 02-09-15, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Makel View Post
Off the top of my head I don't know, they are the cheapy specialized ones though. This is for my husbands bike, we just bought him a rockhopper 29er. I'm pretty sure we have to buy new tires. They will mostly be ridden on red dirt and a little sand, and or a little mud. He did say his back tire was sliding around a lot on Sunday, it was dry and pretty smooth dirt, so he will need tires with a better grip.
I took a look at the Rockhopper 29 models and even the most expensive one does not have tubeless ready wheels. My personal experience with converting completely normal wheels into tubeless is simple: don't do it.

At best, it'll be a pain in the arse. Quite likely, you won't be able to do it yourself, even with a compressor. If a shop does it for you, you'll be dependent on them for tire changes and possibly basic maintenance (like adding sealant).

I would stick with tubes unless you want to spend fairly significant money on new wheels and tires.
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Old 02-10-15, 09:46 AM
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Much easier to start with some stans rims or ust ones. And tubeless ready tires.
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Old 02-10-15, 11:06 AM
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I watched some videos last night, going to try and do it at home, but I will have to buy new tires first. I'm going to the bike shop later today I'll need to get a list together of the stuff to pick up for it. I'm ordering the Specialized Fate comp 29er for myself, LBS guy said that bike will come with tubeless ready tires. I'll let you guys know how it goes, even if it's a fail.
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Old 02-10-15, 04:12 PM
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Bontrager tubeless rim strips work exceptionally well in standard rims. Two strips and stems with removable cores runs about $30. Big bottle of sealant another $20 or $30. I used the Bontrager strips in Mavic TN719 29er rims that came on my wife's Tallboy. The bike shop mechanic recommended I use a plastic tire level to push the strip in far enough to ensure it seats below the hook of the rim. My wife has since upgraded to weight-weenie American Racing Race wheels; they were ready to go tubeless and simply required sealant.

I am currently waiting for an Easton Haven wheel to get a new hub and have been using the Mavic wheel on the rear. I've used many tubeless ready and standard tires on Mavic. None ever burped. Here's the tires I've used: Small Block 8 - required compressor to install. Geax TNT Saguaro and AKA (fit extremely tight and require no compressor to install). Specialized Fast Trak and Renegade - both fit tight but not as tight as Geax TNTs. 2.2" and 2.35" Maxxis Ikons. Both are tight but I needed to use a compressor to install. 2.35 Ikon is the best tire I've ever used. My friends swear by the 2.4" Geax Gomas. They are heavy but can be run with really low pressure for extreme grip.
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Old 02-10-15, 07:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Makel View Post
I watched some videos last night, going to try and do it at home, but I will have to buy new tires first. I'm going to the bike shop later today I'll need to get a list together of the stuff to pick up for it. I'm ordering the Specialized Fate comp 29er for myself, LBS guy said that bike will come with tubeless ready tires. I'll let you guys know how it goes, even if it's a fail.
Specialized 2Bliss tires and tubeless ready rims will be very easy.

Your husband's setup with gorilla tape or a stans kit, or whatever, will not be very easy.
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Old 02-10-15, 09:42 PM
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Just realized something that might help..

The tightest-fitting tubeless ready tires that I've used are Geax TNT. And I've used a lot: Michelin, Maxxis LUST and also TR, Specialized 2Bliss, Geax TNT, and even Hutchinson tubeless CX tires (which SUCKED!!).

Both the Saguaro and the AKA are always a bear to wrestle onto rims with a UST bead. So I would suggest those for your husband's traditional rim. I presume you saw videos / read tips about putting soap on the sidewalls to bead a tight-fitting tire. You usually have to do that with a TNT.

If you're riding pure hardpack (and some bike paths?) try the AKA. The Saguaro is better in loose-over-hardpack but neither are good at all in truly loose terrain. If you've got loose terrain try the Mezcal, it corners better.
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Old 02-11-15, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by ColinL View Post
Just realized something that might help..

The tightest-fitting tubeless ready tires that I've used are Geax TNT. And I've used a lot: Michelin, Maxxis LUST and also TR, Specialized 2Bliss, Geax TNT, and even Hutchinson tubeless CX tires (which SUCKED!!).

Both the Saguaro and the AKA are always a bear to wrestle onto rims with a UST bead. So I would suggest those for your husband's traditional rim. I presume you saw videos / read tips about putting soap on the sidewalls to bead a tight-fitting tire. You usually have to do that with a TNT.

If you're riding pure hardpack (and some bike paths?) try the AKA. The Saguaro is better in loose-over-hardpack but neither are good at all in truly loose terrain. If you've got loose terrain try the Mezcal, it corners better.
I'm a little limited on what I can pick up here. Last night I got a set of the conti raceking 2.2's for him. Today I'm going to pick up some valve stems, and stans or the green goop. I'm still thinking about using a tube and slicing it open instead of using the valve stem with the stopper thing on the end of it. I have a bucket ready.

So what I understand is, stans seals quicker than the green slime, but tends to get "boogers" more often?

I'm wondering if the width of the rim tape matters?
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Old 02-11-15, 09:39 AM
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That wouldn't have been my choice. I was given a set of Race Kings and they're on my old rigid 26". I agree with this guy - they're useless on anything other than pure hardpack or pavement. Sketchy on gravel roads, and slower than file tread. I have the regular version.. I think the protection and UST models both have the UST bead, but all the other variants don't. Quite honestly, you might consider returning them.


Anyway, you also said some things about tubeless valves, split tube and sealant.

Split tube / ghetto tubeless is where you get a 24" tube and cut it on the outside edge facing the tread, and stretch it to fit tightly on a 26" rim. I assume for 29ers you would use a 26 or 27.5 tube - google should return some hits. You don't need a tubeless valve if you're doing ghetto tubeless.

Stans sealant is, in my personal experience, inferior to Slime Pro in every way except cost. Slime Pro stays liquid longer, doesn't form boogers in the tire, and seals bigger holes faster. If you see sealant hissing out, after it seals the puncture you should get out your pump and re-inflate the tire. Otherwise you could be riding on very low pressure.
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Old 02-15-15, 03:40 PM
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I picked up some Stans, tubeless valves, and gorilla tape. Hopeing to get it done tonight.
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Old 02-15-15, 06:37 PM
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So, the first problem we are running into is that we are unable to find an attachment for the compressor that will air up the tire. The second is that we are having trouble getting the tire to fit tight enough for a seal. I'm going to the store to get 26" tubes and going to try it that way next I think.
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Old 02-15-15, 08:23 PM
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http://m.harborfreight.com/air-tools...set-68260.html

Kind of saw this one coming. Tubeless conversions on standard wheels are usually a pita.
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Old 02-16-15, 12:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Makel View Post
So, the first problem we are running into is that we are unable to find an attachment for the compressor that will air up the tire. The second is that we are having trouble getting the tire to fit tight enough for a seal. I'm going to the store to get 26" tubes and going to try it that way next I think.
You need a presta to schrader adapter dohicky which you should be able to pick up from your LBS for around $1. Try that first and then a second layer of gorilla tape before doing the split tube trick. I did the split tube thing years ago and while it works you can only do it once. Want to swap tires? That will be a new tube.
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Old 02-16-15, 10:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Canker View Post
You need a presta to schrader adapter dohicky which you should be able to pick up from your LBS for around $1. Try that first and then a second layer of gorilla tape before doing the split tube trick. I did the split tube thing years ago and while it works you can only do it once. Want to swap tires? That will be a new tube.
Wouldn't it be nice if they were open 24/7 like walmart?

We got one to hold air the other still working on it. I think that we should have gone with 24" tubes, maybe they would have fit tighter on the rim than 26" tubes. So anyways, in the end would have been cheaper to just let the lbs do it, apparently for us there is a learning curve. :-)
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Old 02-16-15, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by ColinL View Post
http://m.harborfreight.com/air-tools...set-68260.html

Kind of saw this one coming. Tubeless conversions on standard wheels are usually a pita.
Yup, we're learning. Good thing is we only have to go through this process once, and then for future reference we'll know how to convert this set of wheels. And knowing is half the battle
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Old 02-16-15, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Makel View Post
So, the first problem we are running into is that we are unable to find an attachment for the compressor that will air up the tire....
Presta to Schrader? Wal-mart sells them, Slime brand, for 2 for $2.

Secondly, I only use UST rated tires for mountain biking. I can't hitch a ride back to the car from the trailside so I value reliability....
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Old 02-16-15, 03:13 PM
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I found that the Specialized 2Bliss tires set up the easiest. They always set for me on the first shot of the air compressor.

I used the Stan's yellow tape and wrapped the rim two times. Air compressor is best...but I used a co2 cart when I was in a bind. You'll need to check the Stan's or whatever sealant you use every two to three months. The stuff will dry and sometimes separate. I've had it separate on me and it did not seal my puncture.

Always carry a tube as a backup. The Stan's will not always seal.
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Old 02-17-15, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by I <3 Robots View Post
I found that the Specialized 2Bliss tires set up the easiest. They always set for me on the first shot of the air compressor.

I used the Stan's yellow tape and wrapped the rim two times. Air compressor is best...but I used a co2 cart when I was in a bind. You'll need to check the Stan's or whatever sealant you use every two to three months. The stuff will dry and sometimes separate. I've had it separate on me and it did not seal my puncture.

Always carry a tube as a backup. The Stan's will not always seal.
Yeah, we wound up switching to a specialized tire, don't remember which one, and then they set up fast and both were done. The conti's felt like a better tire than the specialized, but they just weren't working well with those rims.

My bike is in and it comes tubeless ready, so the lbs will take care of them the first time for me.
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