Go Back  Bike Forums > Community Connections > Regional Discussions > Northeast
Reload this Page >

What are the opinions on the 1st/2nd Ave bikeways in NYC?

Northeast Connecticut | District of Columbia | Delaware | Maine | Maryland | Massachusetts | New Hampshire | New Jersey | New York | Pennsylvania | Rhode Island | Vermont | West Virginia

What are the opinions on the 1st/2nd Ave bikeways in NYC?

Old 06-17-18, 07:42 PM
  #1  
zacster
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Brooklyn NY
Posts: 6,064
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
What are the opinions on the 1st/2nd Ave bikeways in NYC?

These two bike lanes have been in place for a number of years now, and while I use them frequently, I'm still don't think they are all that great. I was in Copenhagen last week and used a bike there and just felt like this was so much more bike friendly in design. On our avenues, we are somewhat trapped in the lanes with nowhere to go. Cars turn left in front of us, we can't avoid the mindless pedestrians, we can't be seen by the drivers since we are boxed in by the parked cars and we can't even get by each other. Before the lanes were put in I was riding on these two avenues and felt like I was part of the traffic and could maneuver around. Now I just can't, unless I ride outside the lanes.

What do you think? Good? Bad? Better than the alternative?
zacster is offline  
Old 06-18-18, 11:01 AM
  #2  
Jarrettsin
Senior Member
 
Jarrettsin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Bronx, NY
Posts: 447

Bikes: 2016 Trek FX7.4

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I just did a loop of the City this weekend and had to use 1st Ave for some of it. I didn't feel it was so bad! Much better then the ones that are just painted lines, it was blocked much less!
And was able to move along pretty well. Not sure what you guys want, no way to avoid cross streets. I would have preferred the east side greenway continued, would like to see them hook up all the different parts of the east side the way the west side is.

Cyclemeter
Jarrettsin is offline  
Old 06-18-18, 02:00 PM
  #3  
zacster
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Brooklyn NY
Posts: 6,064
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
There's no way to avoid cross streets, but I feel the bike lane doesn't allow traffic to see you the way it is set up. And this being NYC people sometimes idle in the turn lane, making it even harder for someone actually making a turn.
I usually am in the during the week, but I also occasionally use them on a weekend and they aren't as difficult to navigate.

I sometimes think it would be better if the lane were on the right, with parked cars at the curb and bus islands so you are not mixing with the buses making stops. It would also be better if NYC cyclists would obey the traffic lights, but that's an entirely different issue.
zacster is offline  
Old 06-18-18, 03:27 PM
  #4  
UniChris
Senior Member
 
UniChris's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: NYC
Posts: 817

Bikes: 36" Unicycle

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked 66 Times in 58 Posts
Originally Posted by zacster View Post
I sometimes think it would be better if the lane were on the right
Yeah, but then you'd get circumstances like the young lady I watched going north on 2nd, screaming the at the southbound delivery guys for "going the wrong way" (!)

I don't cycle vehicularly in Manhattan (in fact largely I just walk around town since it's better exercise, and only ride the greenways or Westchester trails) but when I was younger and bolder bike commuting in Cambridge MA, I did sort of resent some of the early protected bike lanes put in for the very reason that they felt like they spoiled the integration and hopefully resulting mutual awareness with traffic, only to then dump bikes suddenly back in with cars at intersections, which seemed like the most troubling part to begin with.

One that particularly bothered me was just a block long and actually across the sidewalk from a street that was eminently rideable, and from which I needed to make an ordinary mid-block left turn into the minor campus service entrance nearest my lab - I really dreaded the idea of being yelled at to use that one, as it was utterly useless.

I rode the 1st avenue lane northbound precisely once, and the absurdly short distance between intersections on an avenue just made it feel like constant intersection hassle, with no actual riding in between.

Getting the UN bypass actually built would be great. No doubt they'll block it off several times a year (and people complain about fleet week...). In a way, once you get past all the cruft in the 30's and 20's the east side is actually more continuous than the west with only the stoplight at the stinky pier, and less crowded, too. Unfortunately, the only places I ever contemplated using it to regularly go to were just a block or two beyond all that, and far from the river which bows way out there anyway, so it was kind of pointless.
UniChris is offline  
Old 06-18-18, 03:39 PM
  #5  
vol
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 3,739
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
A lot of near-left hooks on 2nd avenue when I rode on it. It becomes very hectic and confusing when near the 59th-60th st. (the bike lane moved from the leftmost to the middle of the avenue, then terminated abruptly\y as far as I remember, as if they don't know how to design it in that intersection).. Still, it's better than without bike lanes. At least it feels safer when riding with other cyclists in the same lane.

I hope they make as many bike lanes protected by medians as possible.

I think some parts of the 1st avenue has bad road surface.
vol is offline  
Old 06-18-18, 05:34 PM
  #6  
Jarrettsin
Senior Member
 
Jarrettsin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Bronx, NY
Posts: 447

Bikes: 2016 Trek FX7.4

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I guess I didn’t mind the bike lane because I wasn’t expecting much. Most of the bike lanes in NY that are just painted lines are ignored by most drivers and not enforced by the police making them just a waste of paint. At least 1 ave offers some protection. Right lane, left lane it doesn’t matter till you get drivers to care! And that’s not happening anytime soon unfortunately.

Give me a greenway away from the cars any day

Last edited by Jarrettsin; 06-19-18 at 08:30 AM.
Jarrettsin is offline  
Old 06-18-18, 06:14 PM
  #7  
UniChris
Senior Member
 
UniChris's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: NYC
Posts: 817

Bikes: 36" Unicycle

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked 66 Times in 58 Posts
Originally Posted by vol View Post
I hope they make as many bike lanes protected by medians as possible.
Hmm, not sure that's a good idea. I ride the Ocean Parkway lane in a group event each fall. It's apparently the nation's first PBL (dating from 1894!!), in the median between the service road and main road, and it's a horrible design for interaction with turning traffic, excusable only because they didn't yet know better and the thought counts. It pretty much only works because we have someone dismount and cork the intersection.

I suppose the upside is you know where you need to worry about getting hit, and where you don't.

Last edited by UniChris; 06-19-18 at 11:25 AM.
UniChris is offline  
Old 06-28-18, 12:11 PM
  #8  
orewatsuyoi
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
true i do appreciate them being there and being blocked off, but still have to be alert at all times , watching for people hailig cabs, standing in them, riding very slow, construction, etc. but it does help
orewatsuyoi is offline  
Old 06-28-18, 05:12 PM
  #9  
Jarrettsin
Senior Member
 
Jarrettsin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Bronx, NY
Posts: 447

Bikes: 2016 Trek FX7.4

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by orewatsuyoi View Post
true i do appreciate them being there and being blocked off, but still have to be alert at all times , watching for people hailig cabs, standing in them, riding very slow, construction, etc. but it does help
In the City my head is on a swivel anyway! But I take whatever separation from the cars, buses, trucks, I can get!
Jarrettsin is offline  
Old 06-28-18, 05:24 PM
  #10  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 37,070

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 420 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5404 Post(s)
Liked 98 Times in 74 Posts
I guess the question concerns the design of lanes that are between the curb and a row of parked cars.

I understand the good intentions but find it too flawed. I manage with it, and I don't refuse to ride in them. I don't refuse because I don't require a perfect facility, and I have good nerves and skills and vision. One problem the city has (and has in common with other places) is that there are some people who are willing to ride only if they feel sufficiently protected. This design seems to help get people out there who otherwise might not ride. The trouble is that it's more dangerous than designs that look dangerous to those people. So we lure them into a feeling of safety and subject them to danger. That's worse than doing nothing. Just because something is something does not mean it's better than nothing.

Even worse are the bike lanes that are placed in the door zone. Someone recently died from riding in one of those. He hit a door that swung open recently, and the impact threw him into the adjacent traffic lane. A truck ran him over and killed him. A lack of bike lanes is better than door zone bike lanes. But the idea is hard to convey and make people happy with.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is online now  
Old 06-28-18, 07:06 PM
  #11  
orewatsuyoi
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Jarrettsin View Post
In the City my head is on a swivel anyway! But I take whatever separation from the cars, buses, trucks, I can get!
same man.. for what it's worth, i think the city has done a good job in the past 5-10 years of implementing bike lanes in the outer boroughs such as queens and bk
orewatsuyoi is offline  
Old 06-28-18, 10:00 PM
  #12  
vol
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 3,739
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
Even worse are the bike lanes that are placed in the door zone. Someone recently died from riding in one of those. He hit a door that swung open recently, and the impact threw him into the adjacent traffic lane. A truck ran him over and killed him. A lack of bike lanes is better than door zone bike lanes.
Were you referring to this accident? NYPD: Bicyclist is Dead After Being Run Over By Box Truck in Long Island City
Agree on what you say, but in that particular case it seems there was no bike lane there (see also one negative comment about the cyclist). (Hard to imagine the shock of the person at the scene who opened the car door).

[addendum: in that case, although the truck driver was unlicensed, it was apparently the fault of the dooring woman. One comment in a related article said the bicyclist landed between the front and rear wheels of the truck after being doored; there was no way the truck driver could have even know what's happening. But the truck driver was fined, the dooring woman was not, and the [url=https://qns.com/story/2018/06/05/queens-senator-calls-bill-passage-deadly-lic-crash-involving-unlicensed-driver/]Queens senator is calling for cracking down unlicensed drivers, instead of dooring.]

Last edited by vol; 06-29-18 at 12:12 AM.
vol is offline  
Old 06-29-18, 08:24 AM
  #13  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 37,070

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 420 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5404 Post(s)
Liked 98 Times in 74 Posts
@vol, yes, that is the collision I'm talking about, and I stand corrected about the bike lane or lack thereof. But it does show that we need to have a complete absence of bike lanes that put us into door zones, and we must always ride out of the door zone except when moving at a speed where a door collision wouldn't be a disaster.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is online now  
Old 06-29-18, 09:45 AM
  #14  
vol
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 3,739
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yes, I always ride slow and cautiously in door zones, thanks to these forums for making it such a well known issue (though not to the drivers).

Originally Posted by Jarrettsin View Post
In the City my head is on a swivel anyway! But I take whatever separation from the cars, buses, trucks, I can get!
Same here. Protected a protected bike lane would have prevented the tragedy of Dan Hangeby.
vol is offline  
Old 06-29-18, 10:28 AM
  #15  
1nterceptor
LET'S ROLL
 
1nterceptor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: NEW YORK, NY - USA
Posts: 4,728

Bikes: 2014 BMC Gran Fondo, 2013 Brompton S6L-X

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 288 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 9 Posts
It's easy to blame cars; parked on bike paths, turns left even though they have the red, etc.
But cyclists share some of the causes for conflicts; going the wrong way, passing too close, etc.
__________________
One day: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20X43026ukY&list=UUHyRS8bRu6zPoymgKaIoDLA&index=1
1nterceptor is offline  
Old 06-30-18, 12:37 PM
  #16  
wilfried
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: The Big City
Posts: 613

Bikes: Brompton M3L, Tern Verge P20, Citi Bike

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 82 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
I guess the question concerns the design of lanes that are between the curb and a row of parked cars.

I understand the good intentions but find it too flawed. I manage with it, and I don't refuse to ride in them. I don't refuse because I don't require a perfect facility, and I have good nerves and skills and vision. One problem the city has (and has in common with other places) is that there are some people who are willing to ride only if they feel sufficiently protected. This design seems to help get people out there who otherwise might not ride. The trouble is that it's more dangerous than designs that look dangerous to those people. So we lure them into a feeling of safety and subject them to danger. That's worse than doing nothing. Just because something is something does not mean it's better than nothing.
.
That's not quite true. Crashes go down when they install protected bike lanes, on the order of 15 or 20%. The difference isn't earth-shattering, but it's not nothing either. They are less than perfect though. Mixing zones are roundly criticized, and you have to learn how to negotiate them. and they just end when the DOT says "too much traffic," which is exactly where you need them most. In my early riding days, I got unceremoniously dumped right in the middle of Queens-Midtown Tunnel traffic by the painted bike lane.
wilfried is offline  
Old 06-30-18, 05:29 PM
  #17  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 37,070

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 420 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5404 Post(s)
Liked 98 Times in 74 Posts
I'm not saying all bike lanes cause crashes. But we are better off without bad ones than with them.

And again, I'm willing to ride in worse conditions than many people are, and that includes some bad bike lanes.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is online now  
Old 06-30-18, 06:56 PM
  #18  
zacster
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Brooklyn NY
Posts: 6,064
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
I just feel I'm a target at the left turns on 1st and 2nd. Bikes have nowhere to go when the cars turn, they don't see you, they don't care. If they stop for one bike they'll start moving again when it clears, and yet there are 20-30 bikes coming up first ave through each light cycle. But how would a driver know? We are hidden behind the parked cars and only become visible when they start making the turn. It is a horrible design. I drive and I don't see them either. You don't stop for something you don't see.

I remember that when I started commuting up first and down second before the lanes I never felt invisible like this. I was that "crazy biker", but at least I was acknowledged. I rode up the left but would take the lane near intersections so I wouldn't be cut off. I never had anyone come close.
zacster is offline  
Old 06-30-18, 07:37 PM
  #19  
Ferdinand NYC
Senior Member
 
Ferdinand NYC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: New York City
Posts: 376

Bikes: Giant road bike

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 59 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
You have to wave your arms and make some noise in order to be noticed by drivers of turning cars. Blow your horn and/or shout.

I use the bike lanes on these avenues frequently, and I am satisfied with the design, despite this flaw. Another solution would be split-phase signals which give separate green lights to bikes and to turning cars. But the problem with that approach is that each green phase is so short.

So, all in all, I'll take First Avenue and Second Avenue the way they are. And I find the suggestion that these avenues were better before the bike lanes to be somewhat shocking. I'd say that the bike lanes have dramatically improved the bicycling conditions on both of these avenues.
Ferdinand NYC is offline  
Old 06-30-18, 08:23 PM
  #20  
vol
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 3,739
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The fatal accident on the Hudson Greenway at Chambers Street and West Street 2 years ago was caused by a right hook. Here is what the city did after that:

After Cook's death, the city DOT met with elected officials, the NYPD and Community Board 1 to discuss possible safety improvements at the intersection, and in November the department changed signal timing at the crossing to prevent southbound drivers from turning right while cyclists had the green light, the spokesman said.

The department also updated the bike lane and crosswalk markings, installed several bollards and converted the southbound right lane to a right-turn-only lane, he added. He deferred an inquiry about Maclean's lawsuit to the city's Law Department, which didn't immediately respond to a request for comment Friday.
Cyclist Death Caused by Bad Design at Hudson River Greenway Crossing: Suit

Last edited by vol; 07-01-18 at 07:41 PM.
vol is offline  
Old 07-01-18, 02:36 PM
  #21  
zacster
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Brooklyn NY
Posts: 6,064
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by Ferdinand NYC View Post
You have to wave your arms and make some noise in order to be noticed by drivers of turning cars. Blow your horn and/or shout.

I use the bike lanes on these avenues frequently, and I am satisfied with the design, despite this flaw. Another solution would be split-phase signals which give separate green lights to bikes and to turning cars. But the problem with that approach is that each green phase is so short.

So, all in all, I'll take First Avenue and Second Avenue the way they are. And I find the suggestion that these avenues were better before the bike lanes to be somewhat shocking. I'd say that the bike lanes have dramatically improved the bicycling conditions on both of these avenues.
Waving your arms doesn't stop a car that is already moving. There is no place to go either because they took away any extra room by making you ride next to the curb. I thought it was a bad design from the day they opened them up and still use them but my opinion hasn't changed.
zacster is offline  
Old 07-01-18, 03:04 PM
  #22  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 37,070

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 420 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5404 Post(s)
Liked 98 Times in 74 Posts
@zacster, I cross behind the turning cars. I do this on the west side, so I don't remember if there are important differences between the west side avenues and the east side ones.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is online now  
Old 07-01-18, 03:50 PM
  #23  
Sy Reene
Advocatus Diaboli
 
Sy Reene's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Wherever I am
Posts: 4,706

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene, Nashbar steel CX

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2209 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 33 Times in 31 Posts
Simple fix is to make only right turns allowable by cars off of the avenues, while bikes are allowed to make lefts. Yeah.. so they need to go one avenue over and then come back around, but oh well.
Sy Reene is offline  
Old 07-01-18, 08:05 PM
  #24  
zacster
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Brooklyn NY
Posts: 6,064
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by Sy Reene View Post
Simple fix is to make only right turns allowable by cars off of the avenues, while bikes are allowed to make lefts. Yeah.. so they need to go one avenue over and then come back around, but oh well.
The problem is on First Ave there isn't always anywhere to turn right.

I also make it a point to go behind the left turning cars, except when i can't. And that is one of the problems. You only have the turn lane to do that, not the entire length of the block like you used to. If the left turns back up you can't get around them, behind them, in front of them. I see how everyone approaches it and it doesn't work.
Probably the best riding I ever had in NYC was in the days post-Sandy. There was no power downtown for days, and no traffic lights, and no cars either. It was kind of eerie, like in a post apocalypse movie. But I volunteered to go to the office in the powered zone and had the entire avenue to myself. There were people camped out in front of every outlet on the streets to charge their phones. I was waiting for the zombies and wolves to come. But I digress...

I'll have to go back to Amsterdam and Copenhagen and see how they do it there again. That's a tough trip but someone has to do it.
zacster is offline  
Old 07-09-18, 08:44 AM
  #25  
zacster
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Brooklyn NY
Posts: 6,064
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
I had another bad day on 1st Ave, with at least 5 left hooks on a ride from Houston to 42nd St. And the bikeway was busy too, so it wasn't like I was the lone rider. I am careful, I watch the traffic as I approach, I try to take the "mix zone" turn lane. It just doesn't work, we just aren't seen and we don't have enough room to go around.
zacster is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.