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packing for STP or long rides

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packing for STP or long rides

Old 07-05-10, 11:30 PM
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packing for STP or long rides

hi guys,

i've read the online notes about what to pack for STP- 2 spare tubes, toolkit, maps etc... this is my
first remote 2 day ride. i'm interested to know what sort of extra things i could bring to enhance
the experience and what is necessary. for instance, i read one person's comments that they bring
a different style of gloves and switch them out 1/2 way along with their socks. is this being
indulgent, or are there some extra items worth packing that are worth the additional space?

i'm doing my best to be a minimalist (which is against my nature), but want to take a small camera, and maybe some other stuff to.

spill your thoughts. i'm really interested.

thanks,
marcie
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Old 07-06-10, 12:10 AM
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My packing list for a long ride:

- two extra inner tubes
- tire boot
- plastic tire tools
- inner tube patch kit
- multi-tool
- cell phone
- wallet w/money and credit cards
- sunscreen
- sometimes, extra chain links
- a little bit of extra food in case the lines at rest stops are too long (maybe just an energy bar or two)
- nuun tablets for putting in water bottle
- camera
- sunglasses

If it's cold in the morning, or threatening rain, I'll also pick and choose various layers and/or rain gear, like leg warmers, arm warmers, a light jacket. If it's going to be rainy I bring extra socks, extra gloves, and a baseball cap to wear under my helmet (the bill keeps rain off your face)

I carry this in a large seat pouch or a handlebar bag.

On a supported ride you don't need much else. The big determinant is the weather -- if it's going to be cold/rainy, you need more.
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Old 07-06-10, 03:41 PM
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STP is fully supported, so unless you need some special food (vegan, or other heavily restricted diet) you don't need to bring food. You're not going to starve in 15 - 20 miles. You can fit everything for STP in a small handlebar bag, or bag like the Carradice Barley.

2 tubes
tire boot or folding tire
pump or CO2
tire levers
multitool

arm/leg warmers for the mornings
sunscreen (if sunny forecast)
raingear (if rainy forecast)
chamois creme
sunglasses
camera

Stuff I pack for a 300k or longer unsupported brevet:
all repair gear above
fiber fix spoke
brake and shift cables
brake pads (for really hilly courses)
folding tire *and* a boot

weather appropriate clothing
- could mean arm/leg warmers, jacket and rain pants, winter gloves and face mask, etc.
long gloves for night time
Hammer Endurolytes
NUUN
Accelerade powder
Snickers bars
Clif Shots
2 Clif Bars
at least 2 bottles of Ensure Plus
extra litre of water
spare batteries
FOX40 rescue whistle (I ride solo in some no-cell-reception areas)

I have a 12L frontbag and a Carradice Pendle to haul all that stuff, depending on the amount of clothing. Summer rides I can get away with just the frontbag since night time temps aren't much below 55 and I only need long gloves, sleeves and knee warmers. Early spring when it's 35 at the start and almost 60 by mid-day, my Carradice starts empty and fills up with clothing as the day warms up.
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Old 07-06-10, 05:10 PM
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I agree, the ride is very well supported. Everything I take on STP fits in my small seat bag and jersey pockets. Look at the weather forecast, then decide on rain jacket and warmers, if the first day looks good just put them in your over night bag. With an early start on Saturday, don't over dress, I can shiver for an hour or two until it warms up, just ride a bit harder to generate heat.

- one extra inner tube
- plastic tire tools
- inner tube patch kit
- multi-tool
- wallet w/money and credit cards
- sunscreen
- a couple energy gels and energy bar
- camera
- sunglasses
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Old 07-07-10, 12:40 AM
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On the 1-day option, how's the support from Centralia to Portland?
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Old 07-07-10, 08:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Sapling
On the 1-day option, how's the support from Centralia to Portland?
Every bit as good as the first half. The rest areas are well stocked and staffed, although there are fewer of them once you cross the river. IIRC, there's a long-ish stretch on Hwy 30 without an "official" stop, and most of us stopped at a convenience store to catch some shade and refill our water.
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Old 07-08-10, 01:01 AM
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fully charged cellphone. put it in a plastic snack bag if you're worried about sweat in a jersey pocket. Doubles as a camera, in a pinch. Put your family, mid-point or end hotel/motel, and "ICE" - In Case of Emergency - numbers into it.

if you wear contacts, some wetting drops and a little plastic camping mirror. If paranoid, or specialize in being prepared, prescription glasses in a soft pouch.

a couple of ziplock bags to put rest stop food into, if you don't want juice from those orange quarters dribbling down your back. doubles as mini-garbage containers.

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Old 07-08-10, 06:35 AM
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Thanks Clifton.

Another suggestion for loading up one's pockets - travel pack of handi-wipes. Amazing how much better I feel after I get the sweaty grime off my face.
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Old 07-08-10, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Sapling
Thanks Clifton.

Another suggestion for loading up one's pockets - travel pack of handi-wipes. Amazing how much better I feel after I get the sweaty grime off my face.
On long brevets I keep a few in my repair kit along with a pair of nitrile gloves. Makes it nice to clean up if you have to fix a flat or a broken chain.
Usually on long brevets I'll just wash my face every 100km at a control stop; but the controls are things like gas stations or mini-marts, not just a tent with a food table. It does feel nice after 200km to wash up a bit before heading out on your next 100 (or more) kilometers.
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Old 07-08-10, 02:12 PM
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^^^ Not to sound undelicate, but the handi-wipes also come in very handy for cleaning underneath the shorts. When I am on a long ride, I will often stop every 75-100 miles at a restroom, pull down the shorts, give everything a quick swab with a handi-wipe, allow to air dry and then pull the shorts back up and keep on trucking. I learned this trick from a motorcycling forum in terms of preventing 'monkey butt'. On a long-distance motorcycle ride, I do it at the midpoint. I do it more frequently on the bicycle due to the increased physical activity.
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Old 07-09-10, 11:45 AM
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Handi-wipes are also handy for de-greasing fingers after tire repairs, etc. Not a bad idea to practice a little personal hygiene from time to time, including rinsing bottles out/off from time to time, having cleaner hands before starting to eat (there is a good reason why the Health Districts want the food handler/helpers to give food to the riders instead of bikers just grabbing what looks good!)
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Old 07-09-10, 04:42 PM
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I "overpacked" on my 1st STP. The second was much better. If it doesn't fit in your jersey pockets and the small saddle bag... you don't need it.
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Old 07-12-10, 04:18 PM
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two additional things for long supported rides: ibuprofen and caffeine tablets
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Old 07-12-10, 05:43 PM
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Ibuprofen, definitely! But caffeine? Wouldn't help me. Much prefer ephedrine but on a long endurance ride like the STP, even that isn't a great idea. No need to speed the metabolism up. It's all about pacing yourself and conserving energy.
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Old 07-14-10, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by MisterAngular
Ibuprofen, definitely! But caffeine? Wouldn't help me. Much prefer ephedrine but on a long endurance ride like the STP, even that isn't a great idea. No need to speed the metabolism up. It's all about pacing yourself and conserving energy.
For a supported double where you'll be finishing well before sundown, any kind of stimulant isn't really necessary. I only bring caffeine and ephedrine on rides where I know I'll be out well into the night, or possibly riding through the entire night.
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Old 07-14-10, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by CliftonGK1
For a supported double where you'll be finishing well before sundown, any kind of stimulant isn't really necessary. I only bring caffeine and ephedrine on rides where I know I'll be out well into the night, or possibly riding through the entire night.
Caffeine works in ways beyond just a stimulant. There's a reason that many sports energy products are starting to include it.

https://www.cptips.com/caff.htm

Originally Posted by Shifty
I agree, the ride is very well supported. Everything I take on STP fits in my small seat bag and jersey pockets. Look at the weather forecast, then decide on rain jacket and warmers, if the first day looks good just put them in your over night bag. With an early start on Saturday, don't over dress, I can shiver for an hour or two until it warms up, just ride a bit harder to generate heat.

- one extra inner tube
- plastic tire tools
- inner tube patch kit
- multi-tool
- wallet w/money and credit cards
- sunscreen
- a couple energy gels and energy bar
- camera
- sunglasses
Sounds just about the same as my packing list, though I don't usually bring a camera since my cell phone has a camera and I always carry it.
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Old 07-14-10, 12:26 PM
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FOX40 rescue whistle (I ride solo in some no-cell-reception areas)
I had not thought about this yet I do a lot of riding around the back roads (old logging roads, etc.). Thanks for mentioning it, I will be picking one up to toss into my pack.
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