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Riding with AFib

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Old 11-25-18, 11:25 AM
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Cuyuna
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Originally Posted by eja_ bottecchia View Post


Excellent book.

I have seven coronary stents, all due to Coronary Artery Calcification (CAC) brought on by diabetes.

It is not the same as aFib, but it nevertheless requires some care while riding.

I donít let my HR get stay above 160 for too long.

For peace of mind I have the RoadId app which notifies my wife if I have stopped cycling. I also have the series 4 Apple watch with EKG capabilities and fall monitor.

I feel better when I know someone is electronically tracking me.

Good luck to you. Let your cardiologist become your new best friend.

Apple Watch Series 4 will ultimately have EKG capability. Otherwise, there's Kardia. I've actually sent EKG tracings from it to my cardiologist while on the trail. I could tell that I wasn't in a-fib, but I send them to him anyway since he's the one that suggested the Kardia. My cardiologist actually IS my best friend.

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Old 11-25-18, 12:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Cuyuna View Post
Apple Watch Series 4 will ultimately have EKG capability. Otherwise, there's Kardia. I've actually sent EKG tracings from it to my cardiologist while on the trail. I could tell that I wasn't in a-fib, but I send them to him anyway since he's the one that suggested the Kardia. My cardiologist actually IS my best friend.

The Series 4 Apple Watch already has EKG capabilities; the app to make it happen, however, is not out yet.

It is great that all these apps and devices exist to make it a safer world for all of us. I use the Dexcom G6 constant glucose monitor to obtain readouts of my current BG levels. It has been a lifesaver.

My wife is my best friend. Followed by my cardio and my endocrinologist. My two dogs are right up there too.

It takes a village to keep me upright and ticking.
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Old 01-03-19, 09:46 PM
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I know this is an old thread, but I'd like to resurrect it. I'm new to the forum and one of the reasons I joined Bike Forums was to join into this "50+" group and get some feedback on questions like this.

I switched to cycling as my main cardio exercise back in early 1994. After that, rode hybrid then road bikes until quietly riding less and less then stopping somewhere around 8 years ago. I'm not sure if I quit in '10 or '11 or just when.

Just about five years ago, on the day after my 60th birthday, I had a cardiac "event" (something or other) while at work. My pulse rate plummeted to 34 from normal 68 or so and I felt like I had been punched hard in the chest. Long story short, no heart attack, just felt awful. Had a nuclear stress test, echocardiogram, nuclear imaging, and wore a Holter monitor overnight. They told me the monitor showed Afib, PVCs, PACs and maybe other junk. In the intervening years I've never had a repeat of what I had at work, and only a couple of times had bad palpitations that I thought were Afib. The last time was about a year ago. Those episodes were always in the early morning hours, waking me up at 3 AM or so, and went away in either minutes or maybe an hour at most. I'm still not sure I know what Afib would feel like, but those 3AM episodes felt like I had two different pulse rates going on. and that seems to fit what Afib is like.

This August, I started getting the urge to ride again, and now ride a few times a week. Not long (longest is 18 miles), and not pushing hard. I read the Haywire Heart and what I got out of it was contradictory. Yes, endurance athletes are more likely to get Afib than non-athletes, but there was also a study that said endurance events were almost a vaccine against arrhythmias. I also got out of the book to not push yourself too hard, allow longer time for recovery and be less "driven".

My first question was whether anyone that had Afib seemed to get worse from riding. That appears to be no based on the conversation here. My next question is what heart monitors are useful watching for it? Is it only the Series 4 Apple Watch and the Kardia Mobile? The Kardia would be impossible to use while riding, with the two hands on it for 30 seconds.
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Old 01-04-19, 08:36 PM
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Originally Posted by BobL View Post

My first question was whether anyone that had Afib seemed to get worse from riding. That appears to be no based on the conversation here. My next question is what heart monitors are useful watching for it? Is it only the Series 4 Apple Watch and the Kardia Mobile? The Kardia would be impossible to use while riding, with the two hands on it for 30 seconds.
Don't know if abib gets worse from riding but when in afib with a very high pulse it can effect your heart and lower your ejection fraction, at least thats what my cardio dr told me.

I have used the Kardia on rides I just pull over and test for one minute. I set it up for a minute test as the Kardia takes a few seconds to stablize the reading.
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Old 01-04-19, 09:24 PM
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Originally Posted by wsteve464 View Post
Don't know if abib gets worse from riding but when in afib with a very high pulse it can effect your heart and lower your ejection fraction, at least thats what my cardio dr told me.

I have used the Kardia on rides I just pull over and test for one minute. I set it up for a minute test as the Kardia takes a few seconds to stablize the reading.
Thanks for the reply. Do you do that regularly, I mean like a few times in a ride, or just if you feel like something is going on?

I had heard somewhere that some of the more recent HRMs had a feature where they could do a primitive EKG to dump to your computer, but didn't find any browsing Amazon. It's hard to beat the Kardia's price, though.
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Old 01-04-19, 10:03 PM
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I noticed mine with my normal garmin hrm. Never felt anything and it did not affect my riding. My hr was 20-30 beats higher than normal.
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Old 01-05-19, 12:06 AM
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Originally Posted by BobL View Post
Thanks for the reply. Do you do that regularly, I mean like a few times in a ride, or just if you feel like something is going on?

I had heard somewhere that some of the more recent HRMs had a feature where they could do a primitive EKG to dump to your computer, but didn't find any browsing Amazon. It's hard to beat the Kardia's price, though.
Mostly you can't feel it. I only did a reading/test one time during my ride, when I took a break. The Kardia has a premium service that will store the ekgs to a cloud and are viewable on your phone. I didn't bother with it I e-mailed the ekg to myself as a PDF. A hrm will show you when your heart rate is abnormally high but it won't show the irregular beat which can vary a lot, 20-30 beat changes in seconds
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Old 01-07-19, 02:09 PM
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I've had afib for about four years now. Mine seems to come on after I eat- I gas up, start belching, and then afib starts and last several hours sometimes. I was in the the hospital on a monitor and overnight my heart was steady- next day when I ate, my heart rate went to 160. Its done it several times when I'm out on my bike. Once I went out about 10 miles, drank some ice water, then 15 mins later gassed up, started belching, and went into afib. My cardiologist wants me to have an ablation, but I think mine is due to a hiatal hernia and reflux. I just went today for barium swallow test- the radiologist said I may have a small sliding hernia that could cause reflux. I can't post a link but If your have reflux , stomach problems and Afib, you may want to search for this video on youtube.

Association Between Hiatal Hernia, GERD, and Atrial Fibrillation by Dr Suraj Kapa www jafib com

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Old 01-07-19, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by BobL View Post
Thanks for the reply. Do you do that regularly, I mean like a few times in a ride, or just if you feel like something is going on?

I had heard somewhere that some of the more recent HRMs had a feature where they could do a primitive EKG to dump to your computer, but didn't find any browsing Amazon. It's hard to beat the Kardia's price, though.
Kardia is a good deal for the price. It's very accurate. The Apple Watch Series 4 will do the same thing now. Both are FDA "cleared" (a less rigorous category than FDA "approved"), but the hardware is good enough to capture a high quality single-lead EKG and the software is good enough to diagnose atrial fibrillation if present.

The only time I actually use either is if it feels like I'm running a high heart rate. I originally bought Kardia because I was noticing heart rates pushing 180 BPM will riding my fat bike on snow covered mountain bike trails. A cardiologist friend suggested Kardia as opposed to putting a Holter monitor on me to make sure that it wasn't atrial fibrillation. It wasn't. I rarely use the Kardia, since I know I don't have atrial fibrillation, but since getting an Apple Watch 4, I do occasionally check my EKG simply because it's so much easier than the Kardia.

If you already have a smartphone, I'd recommend Kardia rather than the Apple Watch unless you want the watch for its many other features. It is a very cool device.

There is a similar wireless device https://store.getqardio.com/products/qardiocore . It monitor HR, variability, will do and EKG, and measure skin temp and respiratory rate. Not available in the US, however.
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Old 01-07-19, 09:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Cuyuna View Post
....

If you already have a smartphone, I'd recommend Kardia rather than the Apple Watch unless you want the watch for its many other features. It is a very cool device.

There is a similar wireless device https://store.getqardio.com/products/qardiocore . It monitor HR, variability, will do and EKG, and measure skin temp and respiratory rate. Not available in the US, however.
That's an interesting thing for sure, I guess I'll keep an eye on it, especially if I don't do something else first.

You talk about feeling your heart racing, more so than just hammering hard on the bike and raising your pulse. I've never had that. I don't recall ever feeling like my heart was really racing. I've felt kind of weird, almost spacey, but never anything like checking my pulse and finding it that high, and haven't ridden hard enough to get that. I really don't know what an Afib episode would feel like.

If I'm going to get something that's a continuous monitor, I would want it to tell me variability. Do you know anything about other HRMs, or any of the FitBits or other wearables? Any recommendations to look at?
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Old 01-07-19, 09:44 PM
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Originally Posted by BobL View Post
That's an interesting thing for sure, I guess I'll keep an eye on it, especially if I don't do something else first.

You talk about feeling your heart racing, more so than just hammering hard on the bike and raising your pulse. I've never had that. I don't recall ever feeling like my heart was really racing. I've felt kind of weird, almost spacey, but never anything like checking my pulse and finding it that high, and haven't ridden hard enough to get that. I really don't know what an Afib episode would feel like.

If I'm going to get something that's a continuous monitor, I would want it to tell me variability. Do you know anything about other HRMs, or any of the FitBits or other wearables? Any recommendations to look at?
I never feel like my heart is racing, just beating fast. Understandable, and I wasn't terribly concerned since it occurred riding a fat bike up a hill in the snow, but 180 seems physiologically high for me at age 68 so I wanted to be sure it wasn't atrial fib, even though the rhythm was very regular. Easier than a Holter monitor or a treadmill.

I don't know about any other devices. The variability didn't and doesn't matter to me other than tracking recovery, as long as I know I'm not in atrial fibrillation. The Apple watch will track my heart rate and graph it, as will iCardio and Cyclemeter. I don't really have much in the way of cardiac concerns, but I am a curious guy and am always interested to see physiology in action.
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Old 01-07-19, 09:51 PM
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I'm probably too much of a gadget freak. I start out thinking I just want to read my pulse - a cheap HRM - then it grows into this list of features I'd like to have. Some of which probably don't exist.
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Old 01-08-19, 06:37 PM
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Originally Posted by BobL View Post
You talk about feeling your heart racing, more so than just hammering hard on the bike and raising your pulse. I've never had that. I don't recall ever feeling like my heart was really racing. I've felt kind of weird, almost spacey, but never anything like checking my pulse and finding it that high, and haven't ridden hard enough to get that. I really don't know what an Afib episode would feel like.

If I'm going to get something that's a continuous monitor, I would want it to tell me variability. Do you know anything about other HRMs, or any of the FitBits or other wearables? Any recommendations to look at?
When I have been in afib while riding I have not felt it. If it was not for my hrm I probably would not have known a difference most of the time. For riding I would recommend a polar chest strap and your smart phone. I my case I did not need to exert my self that much just starting my ride on a flat street my hr went to 130. Another way to tell something is up is to stop riding and monitor your pulse for one to two minutes there should be a steady drop. With my afib the heart rate would drop some go back up drop again and back up and keep this cycle up for 5-10 minutes. From what I have read a healthy heart should drop 13+ beats in the first minute at rest and 40 beats in the first 2 minutes and stay down.

The fitbit is ok but the heart rate is not that accurate or as responsive as a strap on your arm or chest. It is convenient to use and will give you a 24/7 idea of your pulse. The arm and chest strap monitors will also give you the same but are not comfortable for long term 24/7 use.
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Old 01-08-19, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by wsteve464 View Post
When I have been in afib while riding I have not felt it. If it was not for my hrm I probably would not have known a difference most of the time. For riding I would recommend a polar chest strap and your smart phone. I my case I did not need to exert my self that much just starting my ride on a flat street my hr went to 130. Another way to tell something is up is to stop riding and monitor your pulse for one to two minutes there should be a steady drop. With my afib the heart rate would drop some go back up drop again and back up and keep this cycle up for 5-10 minutes. From what I have read a healthy heart should drop 13+ beats in the first minute at rest and 40 beats in the first 2 minutes and stay down.

The fitbit is ok but the heart rate is not that accurate or as responsive as a strap on your arm or chest. It is convenient to use and will give you a 24/7 idea of your pulse. The arm and chest strap monitors will also give you the same but are not comfortable for long term 24/7 use.
Thanks for that - it's very valuable stuff to know.

I've just been trying to find out if the Polar H10 (which seems to be pretty good) and the Polar Beat app will tell you HRV. I'm guessing that since I can't find that as a feature in the descriptions of Polar Beat that it doesn't.
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Old 01-08-19, 09:43 PM
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Originally Posted by BobL View Post
Thanks for that - it's very valuable stuff to know.

I've just been trying to find out if the Polar H10 (which seems to be pretty good) and the Polar Beat app will tell you HRV. I'm guessing that since I can't find that as a feature in the descriptions of Polar Beat that it doesn't.
Didn't know what HRV was so Google to the rescue. Apparently there are apps that can get HRV data from a chest strap according to this article. https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/...-2017112212789 from the article - a free app (Elite HRV is a good one) to analyze the data.

The beat app is pretty good and in addition to your phone, Polar gives you a more detailed free account to monitor the info and it can also be linked to Strava.
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Old 01-12-19, 01:22 PM
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Originally Posted by BobL View Post
Thanks for that - it's very valuable stuff to know.

I've just been trying to find out if the Polar H10 (which seems to be pretty good) and the Polar Beat app will tell you HRV. I'm guessing that since I can't find that as a feature in the descriptions of Polar Beat that it doesn't.
I use an H10 with Elite HRV on my phone. Works perfectly. App is inexpensive.
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Old 01-12-19, 01:26 PM
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I use a chest strap with either a Polar H10 for my V800 watch, or with an ANT+ sensor on the strap for my Garmin Edge. Both devices upload to any of several web services which display graphs of HR during exercise. So far, so good, no Afib. I'm waiting for it though. Bound to happen eventually. Both devices also work with several different HRV apps. The H10 is a bluetooth device.
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Old 01-13-19, 11:00 AM
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Thanks, Carbonfiberboy.

I'm in a bit of a quandry here over just which direction to take. I like the idea of the Polar H10, but it seems like the way to assess Afib in particular is the Kardia EKG sensor. The manufacturer says (in the Amazon Q&A) that it's not certified for HRV. There doesn't seem to be a way to get data out of it into the Elite App.

The EliteHRV app folks have a list of preferred HR sensors, and they don't mention the Kardia or any of the other devices that do an at-home EKG and can label other irregularities. It looks like either the Polar H10 or H7 - which I think is just an older model.
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Old 01-13-19, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by BobL View Post
Thanks, Carbonfiberboy.

I'm in a bit of a quandry here over just which direction to take. I like the idea of the Polar H10, but it seems like the way to assess Afib in particular is the Kardia EKG sensor. The manufacturer says (in the Amazon Q&A) that it's not certified for HRV. There doesn't seem to be a way to get data out of it into the Elite App.

The EliteHRV app folks have a list of preferred HR sensors, and they don't mention the Kardia or any of the other devices that do an at-home EKG and can label other irregularities. It looks like either the Polar H10 or H7 - which I think is just an older model.
To be clear it's not a full EKG, it's only a lead II rhythm strip, and both Kardia and it's app, and the Apple Watch 4 app are cleared by the FDA only for determining the presence or absence of atrial fibrillation. I would bet that beat-to-beat variability for those two devices is being worked on and will show up in some future version of the Kardia and/or Apple Watch software, however.
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Old 01-18-19, 11:02 PM
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Originally Posted by BobL View Post
Thanks, Carbonfiberboy.

I'm in a bit of a quandry here over just which direction to take. I like the idea of the Polar H10, but it seems like the way to assess Afib in particular is the Kardia EKG sensor. The manufacturer says (in the Amazon Q&A) that it's not certified for HRV. There doesn't seem to be a way to get data out of it into the Elite App.

The EliteHRV app folks have a list of preferred HR sensors, and they don't mention the Kardia or any of the other devices that do an at-home EKG and can label other irregularities. It looks like either the Polar H10 or H7 - which I think is just an older model.
HRV maybe isn't about what you think it is. It's about HR variability over short time periods, on the order of 5 seconds, so it's a micro thing. It's not about Afib which is a macro thing. HRV in an athletic setting attempts to speak about one's readiness for exercise and stress levels.

When I've ridden with folks who had Afib events, it was quite remarkable on their part. HR rose from say 130 to 170 very quickly with no elevation of effort and it stayed there for some time. It was accompanied by a sensation of considerable weakness. Upon getting off the bike and sitting for a few minutes, it went back down to normal levels. On 2 rides with different riders, the rider elected to continue at a reduced pace and was OK. On another, the rider phoned home to be picked up, though seemed in good health. However besides exertion induced Afib, to some folks it just happens, though I think probably rare in healthy specimens.

So IME all you need to see Afib is any decent chest strap HRM. The H10 is good equipment and comes with an above average strap, though IME the most durable snap-on straps are Garmin.

Of course an ordinary HRM won't detect any of the other zillion heart abnormalities which a 12-16 lead EKG would show, OTOH I think one needs to be a trained and experienced doctor to read an EKG properly. (ECG is now preferred over EKG.)
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Old 01-19-19, 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
HRV maybe isn't about what you think it is. It's about HR variability over short time periods, on the order of 5 seconds, so it's a micro thing. It's not about Afib which is a macro thing. HRV in an athletic setting attempts to speak about one's readiness for exercise and stress levels.

When I've ridden with folks who had Afib events, it was quite remarkable on their part. HR rose from say 130 to 170 very quickly with no elevation of effort and it stayed there for some time. It was accompanied by a sensation of considerable weakness. Upon getting off the bike and sitting for a few minutes, it went back down to normal levels. On 2 rides with different riders, the rider elected to continue at a reduced pace and was OK. On another, the rider phoned home to be picked up, though seemed in good health. However besides exertion induced Afib, to some folks it just happens, though I think probably rare in healthy specimens.

So IME all you need to see Afib is any decent chest strap HRM. The H10 is good equipment and comes with an above average strap, though IME the most durable snap-on straps are Garmin.

Of course an ordinary HRM won't detect any of the other zillion heart abnormalities which a 12-16 lead EKG would show, OTOH I think one needs to be a trained and experienced doctor to read an EKG properly. (ECG is now preferred over EKG.)
Actually, I am aware of those things, not to dismiss what you wrote.

Where I'm coming from is that I've been diagnosed with afib, although I have never had any sensations I could say positively were Afib.

It's a bit of a story, but the day after my 60th birthday I was at work, in the bathroom, and had the sensation of being slammed in the chest. My pulse dropped to 35 from its more normal 68. In under a minute it was over and my pulse was back to normal. Some time later I was at my desk and it happened again. None of the shortness of breath, chest pains or other things that say "get to the hospital RFN!", but I went to an urgent care place. They took an ECG and said it was completely normal. Bottom line, I wore a Holter monitor for a day (about 3 weeks later) and they said I had Afib, PVCs, PACs and some more junk (I think). I had Nuclear Stress Test, echocardiogram and some other tests, nothing appeared abnormal or wrong.

I've never had the sensation of my heart racing and weakness, like you describe (and I've heard/read elsewhere) but I figure if I should watch for anything, I should watch for AFib first then other arrhythmias. PVCs don't bother me. A few times since that birthday incident, always in middle of the night, I've been woken by weird sensations. My pulse is erratic, but doesn't get particularly high, it's just weird, for lack of a better word. It feels syncopated or like there are two separate rhythms going on. Another weird aspect is that when I got those 3AM weirdness episodes, it was always accompanied by having to urinate several times, like three or four times in a couple of hours, which no one has mentioned as a symptom. I had another set of tests at the cardiologist's which continue to show nothing.

Since AFib is associated with a stroke, which I personally fear more than dropping over from "widow maker" heart attack, and they say they saw me have it, that's the one that I focus on.

The HRV is something I intend for general fitness and biohacking use.
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Old 01-19-19, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by BobL View Post
Actually, I am aware of those things, not to dismiss what you wrote.

Where I'm coming from is that I've been diagnosed with afib, although I have never had any sensations I could say positively were Afib.

It's a bit of a story, but the day after my 60th birthday I was at work, in the bathroom, and had the sensation of being slammed in the chest. My pulse dropped to 35 from its more normal 68. In under a minute it was over and my pulse was back to normal. Some time later I was at my desk and it happened again. None of the shortness of breath, chest pains or other things that say "get to the hospital RFN!", but I went to an urgent care place. They took an ECG and said it was completely normal. Bottom line, I wore a Holter monitor for a day (about 3 weeks later) and they said I had Afib, PVCs, PACs and some more junk (I think). I had Nuclear Stress Test, echocardiogram and some other tests, nothing appeared abnormal or wrong.

I've never had the sensation of my heart racing and weakness, like you describe (and I've heard/read elsewhere) but I figure if I should watch for anything, I should watch for AFib first then other arrhythmias. PVCs don't bother me. A few times since that birthday incident, always in middle of the night, I've been woken by weird sensations. My pulse is erratic, but doesn't get particularly high, it's just weird, for lack of a better word. It feels syncopated or like there are two separate rhythms going on. Another weird aspect is that when I got those 3AM weirdness episodes, it was always accompanied by having to urinate several times, like three or four times in a couple of hours, which no one has mentioned as a symptom. I had another set of tests at the cardiologist's which continue to show nothing.

Since AFib is associated with a stroke, which I personally fear more than dropping over from "widow maker" heart attack, and they say they saw me have it, that's the one that I focus on.

The HRV is something I intend for general fitness and biohacking use.
OMG. What tests did the cardio run? I've had a full workup for less cause! You are certainly right to be concerned. The frequent urination is totally f*****, as it's a sign of heart failure.
Heart failure may cause decreased blood flow to the kidneys, which causes you to retain more fluid. One of the signs of this fluid may be frequent urination
Hit the google machine and then be your own advocate at the cardio's! Or bring your SO who might want to do a little dance on his desk. My guess would be a pacemaker.

Re the previous discussion: This is what friends are for. . . . get another opinion. IME HMO docs get dinged for ordering tests and giving referrals. So they don't do it. My wife and I have both had issues with this and had to fight to get needed treatment.
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Old 01-19-19, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
OMG. What tests did the cardio run? I've had a full workup for less cause! You are certainly right to be concerned. The frequent urination is totally f*****, as it's a sign of heart failure. Hit the google machine and then be your own advocate at the cardio's! Or bring your SO who might want to do a little dance on his desk. My guess would be a pacemaker.

Re the previous discussion: This is what friends are for.
They did an exercise stress test with a radioactive dye for imaging when I finished the run. Then an echocardiogram. They take a continuous ECG while you're running on the inclined treadmill. The last time this happened was in the middle of the night a year ago. The previous time was in the middle of the night a year (two years?) before that. That's the only time I had the frequent urination. I would think if I had heart failure it wouldn't be two nights over a year apart, it would be continuous and worsening. The entire period from my 60th to the Middle of the Night stuff was during the period when I had knocked off riding, I started back the last week of last August. Rode indoors until the temperature outside wouldn't melt an aluminum bike out from under you - about mid-October.

Ever had too much salt? You pack on some extra water and at some point you body gets rid of salt and water together? No, I don't recall if I had too much salt, but I've suspected an electrolyte or mineral imbalance like that was causing both the weird pulse and the urination.

I also have that Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (as do most guys at 65), or "prostate the size of Rhode Island" as I like to say. That makes me more likely to get up during the night, but I usually only get up once.

Just got back from my regular 13 mile, every other morning ride. It's nice that, at 65, I can see progress almost every ride. Getting a little faster, handling the headwinds a little better. Technically, I'm still 64 for another two weeks.
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Old 01-19-19, 01:06 PM
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Originally Posted by BobL View Post
They did an exercise stress test with a radioactive dye for imaging when I finished the run. Then an echocardiogram. They take a continuous ECG while you're running on the inclined treadmill. The last time this happened was in the middle of the night a year ago. The previous time was in the middle of the night a year (two years?) before that. That's the only time I had the frequent urination. I would think if I had heart failure it wouldn't be two nights over a year apart, it would be continuous and worsening. The entire period from my 60th to the Middle of the Night stuff was during the period when I had knocked off riding, I started back the last week of last August. Rode indoors until the temperature outside wouldn't melt an aluminum bike out from under you - about mid-October.

Ever had too much salt? You pack on some extra water and at some point you body gets rid of salt and water together? No, I don't recall if I had too much salt, but I've suspected an electrolyte or mineral imbalance like that was causing both the weird pulse and the urination.

I also have that Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (as do most guys at 65), or "prostate the size of Rhode Island" as I like to say. That makes me more likely to get up during the night, but I usually only get up once.

Just got back from my regular 13 mile, every other morning ride. It's nice that, at 65, I can see progress almost every ride. Getting a little faster, handling the headwinds a little better. Technically, I'm still 64 for another two weeks.
Whatever's wrong with me, riding always makes it better. So far.
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Old 01-19-19, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Whatever's wrong with me, riding always makes it better. So far.
You bet!


My wife and I always used to ride together, but she hasn't started back up until about a week ago, when she started riding our recumbent stationary bike. She's been fighting a tendinitis on her left leg for a year(!) and finally decided to see someone. Six weeks of PT has gotten her sufficiently better to start riding the recumbent. We've always had a disparity in strength due to size (I'm 6' and 200, she's 4'10" and close to half my weight), so riding together was always me slowing down for her and always pulling in the wind. She's aiming to get on the road by the end of February.
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