Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Professional Cycling For the Fans
Reload this Page >

Why African athletes haven't dominated our sport?

Professional Cycling For the Fans Follow the Tour de France,the Giro de Italia, the Spring Classics, or other professional cycling races? Here's your home...

Why African athletes haven't dominated our sport?

Old 07-22-15, 04:16 PM
  #126  
cthenn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Walnut Creek, CA
Posts: 2,410

Bikes: 2015 Trek Emonda SLR, 2002 Litespeed Classic, 2005 Bianchi Pista, 2016 Devinci Hatchet, Some BikesDirect MTB I never ride.

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 536 Post(s)
Liked 39 Times in 21 Posts
Great thread, about as enlightening as the Armstrong threads.
cthenn is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 04:43 PM
  #127  
EastCoastDHer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Oakdale, CT
Posts: 173

Bikes: 1998 Specialized FSR 26", 1998 Trek Wade Boots Team Issue 2 XXL 20", 2001 Cortina DH Extreme 8 26", 1999 Sinister DNA (work in progress) 26", 2001 LeMond Zurich (work in progress) 700c

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
Why? It's a little thing called systemic and institutional racism.
I know some blacks who ride. Some of them are very talented and actually should've won some local races, but the racism in the 70s, 80s and beyond didn't give them a fair chance. And the "whites only" attitude many (thankfully not all) road cyclists have never helps. I can't believe how many whites I used to try to talk to about cycling and they'd either act like I was 5 or just ignore me (it's funny to watch the look on their face after you ask them about their pedals "You run shimano or time?"). There seems to be far less behavior similar to that of a ******bag in dirt but from time to time I get a funny look. One shop I visited tried to explain to me what a bottom bracket was when I asked if they had my size, his attitude changed after I explained I was putting it on my race bike and had just rebuilt my fork and bled my 4 piston disc brakes. I hate to be such a jerk but sometimes you have to be blunt and let people know where you stand and who you really are.

Money is another factor. When I was managing a sporting goods store the majority of sales were low dollar items and usually footballs or basketballs. Why? What's the cost involved in basketball, a $90 pair of shoes and maybe $50 on a ball. $50 in cycling might get you a decent chain. Or maybe a tire on sale. Basketball courts are everywhere. The closest mountain is maybe 3 hours from me. The nature of the beast is what limits it. Basketball has a very low cost to participate compared to cycling. Same with football. Maybe $500-$1000 for all your gear. That much money invested in a bicycle doesn't get much. Consider this: The average DH fork alone is over $1200. So again, everything versus peanuts (on a good day).
EastCoastDHer is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 05:06 PM
  #128  
Leinster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 2,249
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 54 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by EastCoastDHer View Post
I know some blacks who ride. Some of them are very talented and actually should've won some local races, but the racism in the 70s, 80s and beyond didn't give them a fair chance. And the "whites only" attitude many (thankfully not all) road cyclists have never helps. I can't believe how many whites I used to try to talk to about cycling and they'd either act like I was 5 or just ignore me (it's funny to watch the look on their face after you ask them about their pedals "You run shimano or time?"). There seems to be far less behavior similar to that of a ******bag in dirt but from time to time I get a funny look. One shop I visited tried to explain to me what a bottom bracket was when I asked if they had my size, his attitude changed after I explained I was putting it on my race bike and had just rebuilt my fork and bled my 4 piston disc brakes. I hate to be such a jerk but sometimes you have to be blunt and let people know where you stand and who you really are.
I don't want to dismiss your experience, but I've had similar situations in plenty of bike shops where the staff didn't know me. There's almost always a feeling out period where the shop tries to gauge you on the fred scale.
Leinster is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 05:39 PM
  #129  
EastCoastDHer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Oakdale, CT
Posts: 173

Bikes: 1998 Specialized FSR 26", 1998 Trek Wade Boots Team Issue 2 XXL 20", 2001 Cortina DH Extreme 8 26", 1999 Sinister DNA (work in progress) 26", 2001 LeMond Zurich (work in progress) 700c

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
Why? It's a little thing called systemic and institutional racism.
Originally Posted by Leinster View Post
I don't want to dismiss your experience, but I've had similar situations in plenty of bike shops where the staff didn't know me. There's almost always a feeling out period where the shop tries to gauge you on the fred scale.
I'm not buying it. As far as I'm concerned we're all part of the same race: humans. Feeling out shouldn't be a practice, it's not forensics. Customer comes in and asks for a product and you show it to them. Same as when I sold footwear, sure you ask a few basics but if someone comes in and asks for say a size 10 hiking boot you bring them to the hikers you stock in size 10, you don't try to explain what a boot is or how to tie it. Here's a story: 14 year old in jeans a white t shirt comes in and looks at leather jackets. He asks to try on a $1200 shearling bomber, so you comply whilst asking about the fit. He seems pretty keen on it and says he wants it. You ring him out and say "would you like some product care?" And he purchases it, excited. You remark "good choice, now you can protect your investment" and he responds "Yes, I've been saving all year and my grandma gave me some birthday money." Seems odd at first but people will always surprise you if you treat them just like everyone else, more importantly you treat them as you would expect and desire to be treated.
EastCoastDHer is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 05:51 PM
  #130  
Kindaslow
Senior Member
 
Kindaslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Seattlish
Posts: 2,756

Bikes: SWorks Stumpy, Haibike Xduro RX, Crave SS

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 510 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Still a train wreck, but somewhat amusing, like someone falling on ice into a puddle...
Kindaslow is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 07:14 PM
  #131  
sprince
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 888
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by EastCoastDHer View Post
Money is another factor. When I was managing a sporting goods store the majority of sales were low dollar items and usually footballs or basketballs. Why? What's the cost involved in basketball, a $90 pair of shoes and maybe $50 on a ball. $50 in cycling might get you a decent chain. Or maybe a tire on sale. Basketball courts are everywhere. The closest mountain is maybe 3 hours from me. The nature of the beast is what limits it. Basketball has a very low cost to participate compared to cycling. Same with football. Maybe $500-$1000 for all your gear. That much money invested in a bicycle doesn't get much. Consider this: The average DH fork alone is over $1200. So again, everything versus peanuts (on a good day).
I just don't buy that. I've known a lot of riders over the years who spend a butt load of cash on the latest, lightest, coordinated lycra, carbon thingies, most aero helmet, computers, etc. In street clothes, riding my 30 pound $65 touring bike I found on craig's list (what I ride most of the time), I'm still faster than 95% of them (the remaining 5% simply invest more time riding). You could argue that money is a factor for those people who can't afford a $50 bike and $50 to replace the chain and tires once a year, but for everyone else it's just a sorry excuse.
sprince is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 07:17 PM
  #132  
PepeM
Senior Member
 
PepeM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 6,716
Mentioned: 179 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2609 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 51 Times in 22 Posts
We are talking competitive cycling here, not weekend warrioring. Would you say that getting into competitive cycling is as affordable as, say, getting into competitive basketball, which can be done simply by attending a high school with a team (of which there are many)?
PepeM is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 07:25 PM
  #133  
sprince
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 888
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yes. But unfortunately it's not easilly accessible for much of the planet. Petar Sagan won a race on his sister's department store bike, but in Africa or the US the biggest problem might be finding a race within 500 miles, much less finding some kind of organized program.
sprince is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 08:05 PM
  #134  
corrado33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Bozeman
Posts: 4,135

Bikes: 199? Landshark Roadshark, 198? Mondonico Diamond, 1987 Panasonic DX-5000, 1987 Bianchi Limited, Univega... Chrome..., 1989 Schwinn Woodlands, Motobecane USA Record, Raleigh Tokul 2

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1125 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Ajkollme View Post
Second, if Africans have inferior slow twitch mucles, why do they win marathons so frequently? African men have won every single Boston marathon since 1988 with the exception of three (one of whom was Meb Keflezighi, who is an American born in Eritrea, which makes him African).
Both of you should look up the difference between fast and slow twitch muscles. "Fast twitch muscles" are the muscles (and energy sources) used when the muscle is only engaged for X seconds or less (I forget the number.) "Slow twitch muscles" are used when the muscle is engaged for longer. "Slow" muscles use a quickly depleteable energy source whereas the "fast" ones have a much more replenishable energy source.

I feel that in cycling more slow twitch muscles get used than running, but the majority is still fast twitch. Where as in running every step releases the other leg's muscles. I really don't know though. In running you see very thin distance runners. Distance is very aerobic. Where as in cycling you need the leg strength and the aerobic strength. I don't often see black people with massive legs and a very skinny upper body. But, that argument may be circular because generally that body type is reserved for cyclists.

If you REALLY want to know, go read the Exercise Science book. It gets boring really quick. (I hate bio.)
corrado33 is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 08:13 PM
  #135  
sprince
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 888
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
I don't often see black people with massive legs and a very skinny upper body.
Nor do I see any cyclists with massive legs and skinny upper body. Maybe long track ice skating is what you had in mind? BTW you have the energy source argument backwards.
sprince is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 08:29 PM
  #136  
SpeshulEd 
Senior Member
 
SpeshulEd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 8,089
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 686 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by sprince View Post
Nor do I see any cyclists with massive legs and skinny upper body. Maybe long track ice skating is what you had in mind? BTW you have the energy source argument backwards.
__________________
Hey guys, lets go play bikes! Strava

SpeshulEd is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 09:48 PM
  #137  
Leinster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 2,249
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 54 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by EastCoastDHer View Post
I'm not buying it. As far as I'm concerned we're all part of the same race: humans. Feeling out shouldn't be a practice, it's not forensics. Customer comes in and asks for a product and you show it to them. Same as when I sold footwear, sure you ask a few basics but if someone comes in and asks for say a size 10 hiking boot you bring them to the hikers you stock in size 10, you don't try to explain what a boot is or how to tie it. Here's a story: 14 year old in jeans a white t shirt comes in and looks at leather jackets. He asks to try on a $1200 shearling bomber, so you comply whilst asking about the fit. He seems pretty keen on it and says he wants it. You ring him out and say "would you like some product care?" And he purchases it, excited. You remark "good choice, now you can protect your investment" and he responds "Yes, I've been saving all year and my grandma gave me some birthday money." Seems odd at first but people will always surprise you if you treat them just like everyone else, more importantly you treat them as you would expect and desire to be treated.
No seriously. Bike shop staff can be patronising to white ppl too. All the time. I can't speak to any specific incident you may have experienced, but I can't count the number of times I've asked a question about complex tech, or expensive equipment and been directed towards the bikes with Sora thumb shifters.

I partly agree with you on the money; it is an intimidatingly expensive sport. Except I see poor black and Latino and Asian kids driving around in souped up custom cars into which they've clearly ploughed 5-10 times the price of my CAAD10 and then some; so maybe it's as much about what your passion is. And maybe it's as much about what your friends are into.
Leinster is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 10:22 PM
  #138  
jyl
Senior Member
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,516

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 337 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Cycling is also a sport that requires or at least encourages you to have ready access to the open road and uncrowded, semi rural areas. Realistically, few road racers are training in the inner city, doing the stoplight grand prix.
jyl is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 10:23 PM
  #139  
makeitso5005
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by SpeshulEd View Post
If you call Forstemann's upper body "skinny" then I dunno what to say...

https://gymmotivationandfitness.file...4/12/fcj4p.jpg

But there's so many times you have to facepalm in this thread emanating from Campag4Life. His whole obsession about "blacks" being the best jumpers yet he doesn't know that the jumping track and field events (long jump, high jump, triple jump) are dominated by "whites." In addition the best 2nd and 3rd ranked international basketball teams are composed solely of "whites." The fact that he can't understand that opportunity, money and cultural/social environment plays a big role in what sports young athletes choose to play amazes me... There's so much wrong in his posts and if you respond I'm sure he'll move the goalposts again to suit his attempts at insulting people.
makeitso5005 is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 11:23 PM
  #140  
colnago62
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,388
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 254 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 7 Posts
Larry Bird played some pretty good basketball... for a white guy.
colnago62 is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 11:36 PM
  #141  
SpeshulEd 
Senior Member
 
SpeshulEd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 8,089
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 686 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by makeitso5005 View Post
If you call Forstemann's upper body "skinny" then I dunno what to say...
Take it easy, it was a joke.
__________________
Hey guys, lets go play bikes! Strava

SpeshulEd is offline  
Old 07-22-15, 11:39 PM
  #142  
Kindaslow
Senior Member
 
Kindaslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Seattlish
Posts: 2,756

Bikes: SWorks Stumpy, Haibike Xduro RX, Crave SS

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 510 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by SpeshulEd View Post
Take it easy, it was a joke.
Sense of humor here is like that found in disc brake or helmet threads...
Kindaslow is offline  
Old 07-23-15, 04:06 AM
  #143  
Campag4life
Voice of the Industry
 
Campag4life's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 12,599
Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1185 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
Both of you should look up the difference between fast and slow twitch muscles. "Fast twitch muscles" are the muscles (and energy sources) used when the muscle is only engaged for X seconds or less (I forget the number.) "Slow twitch muscles" are used when the muscle is engaged for longer. "Slow" muscles use a quickly depleteable energy source whereas the "fast" ones have a much more replenishable energy source.

I feel that in cycling more slow twitch muscles get used than running, but the majority is still fast twitch. Where as in running every step releases the other leg's muscles. I really don't know though. In running you see very thin distance runners. Distance is very aerobic. Where as in cycling you need the leg strength and the aerobic strength. I don't often see black people with massive legs and a very skinny upper body. But, that argument may be circular because generally that body type is reserved for cyclists.

If you REALLY want to know, go read the Exercise Science book. It gets boring really quick. (I hate bio.)
Finally somebody here with grasp. If you read the link I posted about time to fatigue of the Kenyian distance runners with their superior endurance, the article is pretty clear about their lack of physical strength. Their muscle strength threshold is low. Many junior high school girls can lift more weight. Leg strength over time is what separates cyclists.

Back to Greipel. Are there some black and white track sprinters on the planet that can outsprint his close to 2000w max efforts on the planet? I believe so. How about after racing 110 miles over hills...some steep? No. He is probably top 2 or 3 on the planet. He has unusual strength for his body mass as some top northern Europeans do. Kittel another northern European with unbelievable power also has this gift. Its the combination of strength, speed and endurance that gets it done as a top tour rider. Even he will likely never win the big race even with his unbelievable talent as a bike rider. A guy like Froome will win..who Greipel or Kittel can crush easily with their fast twitch. In fact you can pretty much tell this by looking at all three. Froome will drop Griepel in the mountains however. A balance of speed, strength and endurance wins the day.
Campag4life is offline  
Old 07-23-15, 05:54 AM
  #144  
BillyD
Administrator
 
BillyD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Posts: 25,397

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene '04; Bridgestone RB-1 '92

Mentioned: 268 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6122 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 43 Posts
Campag4life, please leave this thread and do not post anymore for the duration. Thanks!
__________________
See, this is why we can't have nice things. - - smarkinson
Where else but the internet can a bunch of cyclists go and be the tough guy? - - jdon
BillyD is offline  
Old 07-23-15, 07:16 AM
  #145  
Dan333SP
Serious Cyclist
 
Dan333SP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: RVA
Posts: 9,030

Bikes: 2013 Madone 3.1

Mentioned: 93 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5461 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 9 Posts
So this is slightly tangential but I hope it brings a positive spin to the thread. This group operates out of the shop I ride with-

Richmond Cycling Corps

Basically, they run the bike shop as a non-profit to support the cycling corps, which also runs on donations from local businesses and individuals. They created a mountain bike racing team for a local inner city high school, and provide all the equipment/gear and even built a bike course on the school property. The team is actually now quite competitive in the state and the kids love it.

Point is- This little project solves 2 of the problems that are barriers to entry for a lot of inner city youth athletes that would otherwise end up playing basketball or the like. It removes the entry cost, because everything is loaned to them while they're training/racing with the team, and it builds a network of their peers with similar interests.

I think the peer network is one of the keys to all of this. If all your friends play basketball, why would you want to even try cycling, if you had the money? If a few of your friends are saying, "Hey, bombing down hills on these bikes is awesome! Try it!", then maybe you will give it a shot and stick with it when you realize how fun competing is.
Dan333SP is offline  
Old 07-23-15, 07:55 AM
  #146  
seypat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 3,902
Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 914 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 35 Times in 33 Posts
To follow up on Dan333SP's post, Richmond also has this:

The First Tee of Richmond and Chesterfield | Golf Development & After School Activities for Kids & Teens in Richmond Virginia

The point being that if a person does not have access, they won't take up the endeavor. Cycling and golf both have high start up costs especially for kids when the equipment may only be useful for 1 season, if that long.

They also have this event highly marketed as a family event and a way to try out cycling:

http://www.sportsbackers.org/events/moonlight-ride/

Closed course, casual atmosphere, and a great way to get off the couch/get exercise and have fun with the whole family.

Last edited by seypat; 07-23-15 at 08:02 AM.
seypat is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 11:48 PM
  #147  
mawashi
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 289
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Jamaican bob sled anyone? It's geographical, cultural, financial issues that account for why there are not that many African cyclist. In a country where having a pair of soccer boots a luxury, imagine having the funds to buy a racing bike to train.

There are just too many things going against Africans in cycling as it is a very gear oriented sport. Which is why you won't find many Africans in sports like F1, cycling, sailing, winter sports etc etc. If given the opportunity and resources of a typical European, American or Asian kid, I'm sure you'll find more African athletes in all sorts of sports.
mawashi is offline  
Old 08-03-15, 03:46 PM
  #148  
gpsblake
Walmart bike rider
 
gpsblake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 2,014
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 63 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Following up, running is not the same as cycling. Take a look at [strike]Lance Armstrong[/strike] and ignore what you think of him. He was the top cyclist in the world, then attempted to become a world class marathoner. His best marathon was a 2:46, which is really really good, but also not even close to being competitive at a top level, he would be 20 minutes SLOWER then the women's top marathoners.
gpsblake is offline  
Old 08-03-15, 06:08 PM
  #149  
Dubbayoo
Senior Member
 
Dubbayoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 7,681

Bikes: Pedal Force QS3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
There aren't more of us riding largely because of opportunity. The only thing it takes for a Kenyan to start running is a door to walk thru to get outside. Cycling is very expensive. Even as an American I only knew one kid that biked seriously; he quit football to race BMX and we all thought that was weird. Now he's late 40's and owns a bike shop in North Georgia. You play what your friends play.
Dubbayoo is offline  
Old 11-14-15, 12:13 PM
  #150  
texaspandj
Senior Member
 
texaspandj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Heart Of Texas
Posts: 3,323

Bikes: '86 , '87 , '88 , '89 Centurion Dave Scott Ironman.

Mentioned: 82 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1115 Post(s)
Liked 39 Times in 35 Posts
This could easily be a contentious thread.
However instead of "Why African athletes haven't dominated our sport?" It should ask "Why haven't African athletes dominated cycling sport". That " our " insinuates it's only a north American, European and other continents sport.
The only sport that Africans have historically dominated is distance running. I suspect environment, diet, geography(altitude ), spirit/ambition,and perhaps genetics(low weight) play a role.
Most people are posting as if the thread included Americans specifically of African descent.
Had it asked "Why haven't Americans of African descent or American Africans (african americans) dominated cycling since they have demonstrated the ability to dominate every major sport that requires athleticism?" Then I would have responded with the same answer : I suspect environment, diet, geography (location), spirit/ambition, and perhaps genetics (physique) play a significant role in what sports "they" dominate. Later.

Sidenote : Perhaps another way (less contentious) of asking is "Why is cycling mostly dominated by the Europeans?" (Spoiler alert same reasons.) HAH.

Last edited by texaspandj; 11-18-15 at 03:02 AM.
texaspandj is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.