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Old 06-17-09, 01:18 PM   #1
cldwingnut
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8 year old can't ride a bike please help

my 8 year old daughter who lives with her mom brought to my attention that she hasn't learned to ride a bike yet and dosn't even own one. My parrents have 2 older bicycles that were my younger sisters one is a 20 inch Huffy single speed coaster brake, you know the ones with the pads painted pink, yes its a Huffy but a made in the USA vintage and free. the other is a bigger bike not sure of the brand but nicer quality 18 speed with handbrakes. My thoughts are to teach her on the Huffy even though she is slightly too big for it then move her up to the 18 speed. If she lived with me I'd buy her a new nice bike but for every other weekend and the few blocks that will be ridden on it the 18 speed should be more then sufficient. OH and I will have it looked over by a LBS.

What are your thoughts on this idea. What is the best way to teach and older child to ride esp one that is a little afraid of the bicycle. Any thoughts or ideas would be apreaciated.

Thank You
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Old 06-17-09, 02:15 PM   #2
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my 8 year old daughter who lives with her mom brought to my attention that she hasn't learned to ride a bike yet and dosn't even own one. My parrents have 2 older bicycles that were my younger sisters one is a 20 inch Huffy single speed coaster brake, you know the ones with the pads painted pink, yes its a Huffy but a made in the USA vintage and free. the other is a bigger bike not sure of the brand but nicer quality 18 speed with handbrakes. My thoughts are to teach her on the Huffy even though she is slightly too big for it then move her up to the 18 speed. If she lived with me I'd buy her a new nice bike but for every other weekend and the few blocks that will be ridden on it the 18 speed should be more then sufficient. OH and I will have it looked over by a LBS.

What are your thoughts on this idea. What is the best way to teach and older child to ride esp one that is a little afraid of the bicycle. Any thoughts or ideas would be apreaciated.

Thank You
Get her a scooter first, so she can learn the 'balancing' thing.

Good luck.
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Old 06-17-09, 02:20 PM   #3
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Take the pedals off and let her scoot around on a bike.
When she is ready for pedals she will tell you.
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Old 06-17-09, 02:45 PM   #4
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Get her a scooter first, so she can learn the 'balancing' thing.

Good luck.
+2 My son had a hard time learning how to balance without training wheels. We got him a scooter (Razor) and he picked up his balance inside of two weeks. Had a neighbor do the same thing with the same result. Just about all the kids in the neighborhood ride now.
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Old 06-17-09, 02:52 PM   #5
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Search teaching a kid/child to ride on this section - umpteen threads on it.

However...

1. Remove pedals (LH pedal has LH thread, i.e. opposite to normal
2. Make sure she can reach ground easily with feet but legs not very bent
3a) find gentle slope, preferably leading to level ground, and get her to roll down it until she can keep her feet off the floor for a decent distance
or
3b) If no slope, get her to "walk" the bike along until the same thing happens
4. When she can travel at sufficient speed to keep her feet of the ground and steer reasonably well, put the pedals back on and then your troubles start.
5. Once she can ride, she may need a helping hand to get going until her muscles become strong/co-ordinated enough. If so, place your hand on her back, don't push the bike - it will then go where you're pushing it, which may not quite be where she's steering it.

Good luck.

By the way, there are some very good tips to be garnered from a BBC East Midlands programme which is on their website, where an adult reporter is taught to ride on line - I'll try and find it (in fact it's on this forum under the heading "Kylielearns to ride and then takes a trip". The teaching is a model of clarity and structure.
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Old 06-18-09, 09:27 PM   #6
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on that tiny huffy you might not even need to remove the pedals first
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Old 06-21-09, 11:27 PM   #7
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Take the pedals off and let her scoot around on a bike.
When she is ready for pedals she will tell you.
This is what I did with both my kids, in addition to lowering the seat a little so they could put their feet flat on the ground easily. We live across the street from a school with a very slight slope to the ground, so with a little push, they could coast quite a distance. My daughter (best athlete in the family by far) picked it up in about 10 minutes at age 5. My son was a little older and did a lot of 8-foot rides before he finally made it all the way across, but as I recall (it was 20 years ago), it took a couple of half-hour sessions before he was zooming in circles. Then put the pedals back on as footrests, and soon they'll be riding.
Incidentally, I was 10 or 11 before I learned to ride, and I've been doing it for more than 50 years now.
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Old 06-21-09, 11:46 PM   #8
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Removing the pedals is a big help since it avoids hurt ankles and shins from hitting the pedals - and with a reluctant learner you definitely want to avoid anything that hurts.

As others have indicated, the main thing is to use a bike that's small enough so the child can comfortably sit on the lowered seat and have their feet flat on the ground even with a slight bend at the knees. That way they can stop any incipient fall by just stepping down on the ground. Removing the fear of falling provides the confidence to try coasting for longer and longer distances.

Should take under an hour to get the balancing down well enough to coast for extended distances and steer the bike in the desired direction. Then adding the pedals (still with a much lower than normal seat) and learning to ride comes very quickly - especially if they've ever ridden a tricycle. Finally start raising the seat in small increments to get more efficient pedaling.
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Old 06-27-09, 03:31 PM   #9
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tube handle on seat

use an old tube wrapped around the seat post as a handle to help their balance on the bike.

it beats bending over trying to hold the seat on the smaller 12" wheeled bikes.

this method worked quickly with our 4 year old. he was scared of losing the training wheels, but we made him lose them on his birthday.
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Old 06-27-09, 05:22 PM   #10
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My son never really wanted to ride, and then finally he decided he had to learn at age 9. I thought about removing the pedals, but I don't know if he would have followed up on that at his advanced age. So I did the old "push the kid until he figures out how to balance" trick. Worked with my daughter, she learned in about 30 minutes. My son wouldn't balance, he forced me to do it for him. I think my neck never recovered from that... Still only took a few hours over 2 sessions.
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Old 06-29-09, 12:33 PM   #11
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I had a unique method for teaching my kids to learn to ride a bike. Neither of them had a lot of interest at first, but I did the old hold seat thing for each of them. The difference for me was, I was always on my roller blades when I was holding the bike. That way I could coast next to them and let them get up to speed a bit before I would attempt to let them go for awhile. I know this won't work for everyone, but it did wonders for the kids confidence and it made me feel good about being the one to teach them how to ride.

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Old 06-29-09, 06:40 PM   #12
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Already been some good techniques suggested here so I will only add

Relax
Have Fun
No Rush
Ice Cream Breaks Work Wonders
Shop Together for Pink Streamers
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Old 07-23-17, 05:13 AM   #13
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Stupid responses

First, is the child learning disabled or Autistic? Maybe you should mind your own business. I know a child that was 11 and had these issues. She could never roller skate and learned to ride a bike but was hit by a car because she can't deal with all the things around her and riding too.

You shouldnt endanger this child by tying a tube around her. These PEOPLE ARE ********. An old bike IS NOT GOOD. Safety issues have been dealt with since then. If you are so nosy that you want to interfere with how her Guardians are dealing with her, then get your cheap a_ _ to a Walmart and buy a bicycle for $70. Buy one with TRAINING WHEELS or order the TRAINING WHEELS separately.

TRAINING WHEELS are a SAFE WAY TO LEARN.
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Old 07-23-17, 06:03 AM   #14
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Chill out.

The OP never states the child has any learning disabilities. Nobody mentions anything about tying a tube to the child. The OP came asking for help and forum members offered some valid ideas. So nobody needs to "mind their own business". Except, maybe you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluboy View Post
First, is the child learning disabled or Autistic? Maybe you should mind your own business. I know a child that was 11 and had these issues. She could never roller skate and learned to ride a bike but was hit by a car because she can't deal with all the things around her and riding too.

You shouldnt endanger this child by tying a tube around her. These PEOPLE ARE ********. An old bike IS NOT GOOD. Safety issues have been dealt with since then. If you are so nosy that you want to interfere with how her Guardians are dealing with her, then get your cheap a_ _ to a Walmart and buy a bicycle for $70. Buy one with TRAINING WHEELS or order the TRAINING WHEELS separately.

TRAINING WHEELS are a SAFE WAY TO LEARN.
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Old 07-23-17, 08:06 AM   #15
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It's been eight years. I trust the child has learned by now
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Old 07-23-17, 08:16 AM   #16
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It's been eight years. I trust the child has learned by now
Ha! I didn't notice that this was a Zombie Thread.
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Old 07-25-17, 07:43 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by bluboy View Post
First, is the child learning disabled or Autistic? Maybe you should mind your own business. I know a child that was 11 and had these issues. She could never roller skate and learned to ride a bike but was hit by a car because she can't deal with all the things around her and riding too.

You shouldnt endanger this child by tying a tube around her. These PEOPLE ARE ********. An old bike IS NOT GOOD. Safety issues have been dealt with since then. If you are so nosy that you want to interfere with how her Guardians are dealing with her, then get your cheap a_ _ to a Walmart and buy a bicycle for $70. Buy one with TRAINING WHEELS or order the TRAINING WHEELS separately.

TRAINING WHEELS are a SAFE WAY TO LEARN.
Holy mother of pearl!!! Did you just register here and revive a zombie thread just so you can show off your epic curmudgeon self?
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Old 07-25-17, 07:49 PM   #18
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Take the pedals off and let her scoot around on a bike.
When she is ready for pedals she will tell you.
+1

2 year old children routinely master so-called balance bikes in an hour or so, often much faster.

Removing the pedals and lowering the seat so she can place both feet on the floor will solve the confidence issue, and she'll master the "steer to balance" coordination which is key to bicycling. Once that's programmed, it's there for life (it's true that you cannot forget how to ride a bike), and then you can raise the seat and mount the pedals, so she can add this second skill to the first and be good to go.

BTW - you can't "teach" someone how to ride a bike. It's learned naturally during play, and anything you try to add only gets in the way. Set up the bike as described, take her to a safe wide open place to play with it. Be sure to bring a lawn chair, beer cooler and entertainment because you're not needed.
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Old 07-25-17, 07:56 PM   #19
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She is 16 now.
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Old 07-25-17, 08:01 PM   #20
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Add me to the list of those who HATE zombie threads.

However, we never know who might see it and find it of interest for themselves, so there's never any harm in rehashing good ideas.
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Old 07-25-17, 08:14 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by cldwingnut View Post
my 8 year old daughter who lives with her mom brought to my attention that she hasn't learned to ride a bike yet and dosn't even own one. My parrents have 2 older bicycles that were my younger sisters one is a 20 inch Huffy single speed coaster brake, you know the ones with the pads painted pink, yes its a Huffy but a made in the USA vintage and free. the other is a bigger bike not sure of the brand but nicer quality 18 speed with handbrakes. My thoughts are to teach her on the Huffy even though she is slightly too big for it then move her up to the 18 speed. If she lived with me I'd buy her a new nice bike but for every other weekend and the few blocks that will be ridden on it the 18 speed should be more then sufficient. OH and I will have it looked over by a LBS.

What are your thoughts on this idea. What is the best way to teach and older child to ride esp one that is a little afraid of the bicycle. Any thoughts or ideas would be apreaciated.

Thank You
You could get him a balance bike and/or try easing him into riding on a tandem bike.
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Old 07-25-17, 08:31 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
Removing the pedals and lowering the seat so she can place both feet on the floor will solve the confidence issue, and she'll master the "steer to balance" coordination which is key to bicycling. Once that's programmed, it's there for life (it's true that you cannot forget how to ride a bike)
This video shows that one can indeed forget how to ride a bike - but it takes considerable effort.
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Old 07-25-17, 08:41 PM   #23
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This video shows that one can indeed forget how to ride a bike - but it takes considerable effort.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFzDaBzBlL0
Actually, as you know, it shows how riding a bicycle is so deeply programmed in our brains that it's near impossible to unlearn and reprogram.
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Old 07-27-17, 12:29 AM   #24
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She is 16 now.
Yeah, Dad has bigger things to worry about now.
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Old 07-28-17, 04:39 PM   #25
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Yeah, Dad has bigger things to worry about now.
But you mean also something with "riding"
http://www.ebiketester24.de/fahrradschuhe-damen-herren/

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