Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Recumbent
Reload this Page >

Cassettes vs hubs (Performer Trike)

Notices
Recumbent What IS that thing?! Recumbents may be odd looking, but they have many advantages over a "wedgie" bicycle. Discuss the in's and out's recumbent lifestyle in the recumbent forum.

Cassettes vs hubs (Performer Trike)

Old 06-08-21, 09:56 AM
  #1  
Aimulator64
Don't forget to look up!
Thread Starter
 
Aimulator64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 267

Bikes: Raleigh Route 2, Motobecane Sprint Ultegra, Performer JC-70 Recumbent Trike (soon)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Cassettes vs hubs (Performer Trike)

Good day, and my apologies if this has been asked before. the last time I posted on Bike Forums was 11 years ago, and I often broke forum "etiquette" when asking previously asked questions. I have been off a bike for almost that long, and have been getting back to it slowly.

I am eagerly awaiting my new Performer JC-70 in sunrise orange metallic to ship from Taiwan, and I tested some other more expensive models from Ice and Catrike before deciding on Performer for a price vs equipment perspective. The performer is untested for me so hopefully it isn't too different from the ones I liked. I plan to post a nice introductory thread regarding assembly and my thoughts if anyone is interested. I decided on a trike at age 30 simply for comfort, fun, and the ability to go more than 2-4 hours without a numb lower half and sore back muscles and wrists. I have no health issues or physical shortcomings, just wanted to mention that so I can squash some of the stigma around the trike rider profile (you wouldn't or maybe would believe just how many people will ask me why I ordered a trike when I have bikes and I'm not old or disabled).

The Performer comes standard with a nice gearing range, or so I believe, for the type of travels I expect to go on with it. It has a 11-32 10 speed cassette and 30/39/50 chainring with Tiagra derailleurs. I am much more interested in properly-paced long distance adventuring over trying to beat my DF lap times for my typical routes so I am happy with the lower range between the first 2 front rings, and will likely never go into the third. New York is very hilly anyway. What I would like some feedback on is whether or not I should consider a Rohloff 14 speed hub over the cassette eventually (assuming I can even swap the components on this trike like that) in order to be able to fill in some gaps in between sprockets and gain more range and to gain the durability of the hub, or if I would be wasting my time and money to not notice a difference.

Does anyone have some input on the benefits of the internal hubs over a typical cassette other than the obvious "it's sealed and more durable" argument, which is strong already? I have never used an internal hub before, but many people who tour swear by them. Trying to do the swap seems daunting and it is incredibly expensive, but I plan to ride this trike until the welds on the frame break or my internal welds do.

Thanks for your time!
Aimulator64 is offline  
Old 06-08-21, 02:29 PM
  #2  
VegasTriker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sin City, Nevada
Posts: 2,462

Bikes: Catrike 700, Greenspeed GTO trike, , Linear LWB recumbent, Haluzak Horizon SWB recumbent, Balance 450 MTB, Cannondale SM800 Beast of the East

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 402 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 100 Times in 78 Posts
How to double the cost of your trike

There is something to be said for the simple 3X10 gearing already on your trike. You can get parts at most bike shops and if you need service they can do it. When you get into hubs like the ones I have used in the past (SRAM dual-drive and Schlumpf Mountain Drive) that gets a lot more iffy. Nobody that I could find in Las Vegas with a population of just under 2M is experienced in their repair. I had to do it myself.

You can use a gear range calculator to compare the range for any combination of gears. I like either Sheldon Brown or Mike Sherman's calculators. Your new trike has a gear range of 25.5 to 123.5. That's a little narrower than my Catrike 700 with a gear range of 20.9 to 124.2 using the same calculator. I ride mostly in the middle range and almost never use the lowest gears on the trike.

If you look up the current cost for just the hub unit for the Rohloff 14 speed it costs right around $1,500 to 1,600 depending on the source. Then you need to add to cost of rebuilding the rear wheel with new spokes. Add it up and you have darn near doubled the cost of the trike. Most new riders have a hard time with the hills until they develop the muscles needed to propel a trike. It's somewhat different from what you use on a DF bike. Give it a chance and you may save a bundle.

I've read a few posts on people who bought a Performer trike. About the only negative comment I remember is that it takes a bit of mechanical knowledge to assemble the trike. Having assembled two trikes myself from a frame and components I can agree with that. It's nice to be able to check and adjust the toe-in for example. It's a critical setting for getting the most mileage out of your tires and when set right makes the trike easier to pedal.
VegasTriker is offline  
Old 06-08-21, 03:30 PM
  #3  
Leisesturm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 4,693
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1723 Post(s)
Liked 267 Times in 199 Posts
I agree with nearly all of post #2. I have a Performer from 2017 and the 10sp is 11-36! A 10sp 11-32 seems awfully ... close, but I don't claim to know it all. Still, the first thing I did to that BIKE was swap out the 30T granny for a 24T. Yah, a gear range starting around 16" and I don't find that impossibly low on a bike. There are trikes out there with low ends in the single digit gear inches. A 30 year old may not be ready for that quite yet but I would keep the knowledge tucked away, 60 comes up awfully fast when you are having as much fun as you will be having. A Rohloff on a Performer is kind of like a Bosch aftermarket fuel injection racing unit on Hyundai Econo-sedan. You saved a bundle (well played) buying that trike instead of an ICE or Cattrike so why would you even consider for a second blowing those savings on a $1500+ rear hub with only a ~535% overall gear range?
Leisesturm is offline  
Likes For Leisesturm:
Old 06-08-21, 04:38 PM
  #4  
Aimulator64
Don't forget to look up!
Thread Starter
 
Aimulator64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 267

Bikes: Raleigh Route 2, Motobecane Sprint Ultegra, Performer JC-70 Recumbent Trike (soon)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by VegasTriker View Post
There is something to be said for the simple 3X10 gearing already on your trike. You can get parts at most bike shops and if you need service they can do it. When you get into hubs like the ones I have used in the past (SRAM dual-drive and Schlumpf Mountain Drive) that gets a lot more iffy. Nobody that I could find in Las Vegas with a population of just under 2M is experienced in their repair. I had to do it myself.

You can use a gear range calculator to compare the range for any combination of gears. I like either Sheldon Brown or Mike Sherman's calculators. Your new trike has a gear range of 25.5 to 123.5. That's a little narrower than my Catrike 700 with a gear range of 20.9 to 124.2 using the same calculator. I ride mostly in the middle range and almost never use the lowest gears on the trike.

If you look up the current cost for just the hub unit for the Rohloff 14 speed it costs right around $1,500 to 1,600 depending on the source. Then you need to add to cost of rebuilding the rear wheel with new spokes. Add it up and you have darn near doubled the cost of the trike. Most new riders have a hard time with the hills until they develop the muscles needed to propel a trike. It's somewhat different from what you use on a DF bike. Give it a chance and you may save a bundle.

I've read a few posts on people who bought a Performer trike. About the only negative comment I remember is that it takes a bit of mechanical knowledge to assemble the trike. Having assembled two trikes myself from a frame and components I can agree with that. It's nice to be able to check and adjust the toe-in for example. It's a critical setting for getting the most mileage out of your tires and when set right makes the trike easier to pedal.
I will have little issue, I assume, with the assembly and have actually been researching trikes for years off and on to decide what I wanted to buy. I know I am getting ahead of myself with this concept as no matter how well equipped the trike will be, my legs are only so equipped to pedal it. I agree there.

Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
I agree with nearly all of post #2. I have a Performer from 2017 and the 10sp is 11-36! A 10sp 11-32 seems awfully ... close, but I don't claim to know it all. Still, the first thing I did to that BIKE was swap out the 30T granny for a 24T. Yah, a gear range starting around 16" and I don't find that impossibly low on a bike. There are trikes out there with low ends in the single digit gear inches. A 30 year old may not be ready for that quite yet but I would keep the knowledge tucked away, 60 comes up awfully fast when you are having as much fun as you will be having. A Rohloff on a Performer is kind of like a Bosch aftermarket fuel injection racing unit on Hyundai Econo-sedan. You saved a bundle (well played) buying that trike instead of an ICE or Cattrike so why would you even consider for a second blowing those savings on a $1500+ rear hub with only a ~535% overall gear range?
I will admit, I honestly have no idea how to make sense of ratios and charts. Inches, for example, is so confusing to me. The reason why I am considering the hub is because I plan to do trikepacking and long distance day rides with this trike and I am a firm believer that the only things that make more expensive bikes worth the money are the components and frame technology when you get into carbon setups or titanium where welds are critical. An aluminum tube frame on a trike is very basic, and most frames are going to be welded and butted properly from the beginning so frame to frame, brands can be very competitive, yet cheaper trikes like Performer's will sacrifice their base shiftsets and brakes, etc, but with upgrades a Performer frame can be just as viable as a Catrike or Ice. Because of this theory, I don't mind spending money on worthwhile uprades. Much like a $25k Jeep Wrangler can be upgraded to be better offroad than an $85k Toyota Land Cruiser with the right parts. a $2k Performer trike and a $3k Catrike both roll off the line sans internal hub. I have been assuming, based on video research and vlogger posts, that the internal hubs are a necessary upgrade for the sake of long term durability. Derailleurs break and fail much more often and are exposed to the elements and road grit, etc, so they, while more easily obtained, will fail far more often, and realistically give you less range than a hub. The range I envision likely doesn't give me any benefit, I just did the guesswork math and assumed it would. The closer ratios you can get, the easier your cadence can be managed while loaded down with gear.

I appreciate the responses, I am literally clueless about ranges and trike muscle use, etc. Forgive my lack of understanding of some of your points you made.
Aimulator64 is offline  
Old 06-08-21, 05:06 PM
  #5  
Aimulator64
Don't forget to look up!
Thread Starter
 
Aimulator64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 267

Bikes: Raleigh Route 2, Motobecane Sprint Ultegra, Performer JC-70 Recumbent Trike (soon)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Also just to clarify, I misspoke, it has an 11-34 cassette according to lightfoot bicycles. They are the only website that shows the supposed specs for the Tiagra upgrade. ​​​​​​​
Aimulator64 is offline  
Old 06-09-21, 08:08 AM
  #6  
VegasTriker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sin City, Nevada
Posts: 2,462

Bikes: Catrike 700, Greenspeed GTO trike, , Linear LWB recumbent, Haluzak Horizon SWB recumbent, Balance 450 MTB, Cannondale SM800 Beast of the East

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 402 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 100 Times in 78 Posts
The concept of gear inches for a gear range is it allows you to easily compare bikes with different sized wheels. My first trike had a 20 inch drive wheel and 3X9 drive train. The gear range was 19 to 98. My second trike with internal hubs and still a 20" drive wheel had a gear range of 14 to 128 gear inches while my Catrike 700 with a 700C rear wheel is 20.0 to 124.2 GI. It's pretty easy to understand which trike had the lowest low and the highest high gear and how they compare.

I own one of the best trikes ever designed specifically for touring, a 2001 Greenspeed GTO. It came equipped with a single 65 tooth chainring, Schlumpf Mountain Drive (front internal 2-speed hub), and 3X8 SACHS Spectro 7 in the rear. That gave it the extraordinary wide gear range. It has Hope C2 hydraulic disc brakes for super stopping power, The frame is steel and the total weight is 39 pounds. The trike has more than 30,000 miles on it and I am the third owner. In those 30K miles the rear derailleur (Shimano 105) had to be replaced once. It didn't break but simply wore out from too many miles. The GTO has been out of production for more than a decade but they show up used on occasion, I paid $2,400 for it back in 2004 and it came with hundreds of dollars in touring accessories. I consider it a bargain purchase.

I'm pretty sure I used 11/34 for the cassette when entering the data in Sheldon Brown's gear calculator. I got the numbers off the Performer website.

Last edited by VegasTriker; 06-09-21 at 08:14 AM.
VegasTriker is offline  
Old 06-09-21, 08:47 AM
  #7  
maleger
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have Sturmey-Archer hubs on my Brompton bikes. One issue with the hub is the complexity of self-maintenance. While the S-A is relatively simple for a hab and there is a lot of documentation on the web, others may be more complex. I really like to ability to be able to maintain my bikes myself. Yes, the hubs are more expensive, but I personally don't care too much for that argument (since it's already a pretty expensive bike anyway). But they are very reliable, this I care about.
maleger is offline  
Old 06-09-21, 08:49 AM
  #8  
Aimulator64
Don't forget to look up!
Thread Starter
 
Aimulator64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 267

Bikes: Raleigh Route 2, Motobecane Sprint Ultegra, Performer JC-70 Recumbent Trike (soon)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Upon doing some reading on Sheldon Brown's site, I can make most sense now of the gear inches as far as comparison between gear ranges goes, I just don't know how to relate that information to rotation of the wheel, but I am likely overthinking it, as ratios are ratios, and are only meant to be ratios for the sake of multiplying input and comparing apples to apples and describing ranges. Thank you for the help!

I won't worry yet about my components and will just wait for something to fail more than once to prove out the need for something more durable. Aside from the durability of internal hub components I was really just curious about the benefits of the shorter ratios. 3 speeds in the front and 14 in the back would give me 42 speeds, and as long as the high/lows weren't completely out of proportion, that should translate to easier cadence management up inclines and on flat ground. The current DF I ride has an 8 speed cassette and the jump from 2/5 to 2/6 is so huge and frustrating, yet right between the 2 is where I would like to cruise, and 1/8 is too low. I want to avoid that on a touring setup.

Also, not that you asked, but I feel I should mention that I do understand that the JC-70, much like the Catrike 700, is built lower and faster than a JC-20 or a Catrike villager or the GTO. The gearing on the JC-70 is obviously meant to save cost while giving a decent high/low range, whereas more expensive fast/race trikes will have narrow ranges for speed. I purposely made this purchase decision because touring isn't the ONLY thing I plan to do, and the longer wheel base for stability and higher gear mounting clearance is an assumed benefit to me, being 6'2" tall. I am, in a way, trying to do more with the trike than it may necessarily be built for, but I feel like the JC-70 is so well-rounded for a 700C trike compared to the faster models in the big name lineups.
Aimulator64 is offline  
Old 06-09-21, 09:01 AM
  #9  
Aimulator64
Don't forget to look up!
Thread Starter
 
Aimulator64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 267

Bikes: Raleigh Route 2, Motobecane Sprint Ultegra, Performer JC-70 Recumbent Trike (soon)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by maleger View Post
I have Sturmey-Archer hubs on my Brompton bikes. One issue with the hub is the complexity of self-maintenance. While the S-A is relatively simple for a hab and there is a lot of documentation on the web, others may be more complex. I really like to ability to be able to maintain my bikes myself. Yes, the hubs are more expensive, but I personally don't care too much for that argument (since it's already a pretty expensive bike anyway). But they are very reliable, this I care about.
I'm assuming those hubs are to replace the front chainrings? Your maintenance for the hubs must have longer intervals than your cassettes, assuming you are talking about a 2/3 speed rear freewheel hub. I have to degrease, clean, toothbrush, and re-lube my cassette every few rides here in NY as the roads are filthy and the grit sticks to the cogs and files down the insides of my chain links. Especially with long distance and multiple day trips over hundreds of miles I eventually would like the satisfaction of not having to worry as much about the grit-traps and move everything internal. However, depending on my experience with the Performer trike over the next year or two, I may decide to justify buying a new trike all together that comes pre-equipped with an all-internal driveline. If I am impressed enough with the ergonomics and the frame on the Performer I see no reason against spending money on better driveline and brake components. Heck, I'll bet some trike manufacturer could make a ton of money by designing a shaft-driven driveline that is internal to the main frame tube with sealed bearings on the ends that can adapt to a belt drive or something to save weight and extend maintenance intervals
Aimulator64 is offline  
Old 06-09-21, 10:07 AM
  #10  
Leisesturm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 4,693
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1723 Post(s)
Liked 267 Times in 199 Posts
Originally Posted by Aimulator64 View Post
Also, not that you asked, but I feel I should mention that I do understand that the JC-70, much like the Catrike 700, is built lower and faster than a JC-20 or a Catrike villager or the GTO.
This is an incorrect assumption. Except for the size of the rear wheel, both models are IDENTICAL. Same seat angle, same seat height. Both equipped with fenders, rack, etc. And your other assumption about the superiority of internal gear hubs also has to be challenged as long as I am in this text input field. IGH hubs are expensive, heavy, complex and most cannot withstand much abuse. Very few IGH are designed with more than a single chainring in mind. I believe the Rolhoff is stronger than most, but that isn't saying much. I don't know the exact numbers, but I am pretty certain that a 50/39/30 triple crank, plus 11/34 cassette, has a wider gear range than the Roloff with a single ring and in some situations you will void the Rolloff warranty if you have a triple setup up front.

IGH are more efficient in certain gears than others. Derailleurs are more or less equally efficient in all gears and that efficiency is rarely less than 94%. In more than 100 years of development there still isn't anything approaching that kind of efficiency, and yet the derailleur system is utterly simple. I don't do anything special for my drivetrains. I'm much too lazy. The regimen you describe that maintains your derailleur systems is overkill. Way too much work. That is what is turning you off. I fear you will be disappointed when/if you go over to IGH.
Leisesturm is offline  
Old 06-09-21, 10:17 AM
  #11  
maleger
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
As I'm in Montreal (Canada) I would have similar maintenance issues to upstate NY. I have 2/3 and 5-speed SA hubs.

I like the shaft idea! Sounds like a nice project for an innovative trike designer.
maleger is offline  
Old 06-09-21, 10:27 AM
  #12  
Aimulator64
Don't forget to look up!
Thread Starter
 
Aimulator64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 267

Bikes: Raleigh Route 2, Motobecane Sprint Ultegra, Performer JC-70 Recumbent Trike (soon)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
This is an incorrect assumption. Except for the size of the rear wheel, both models are IDENTICAL. Same seat angle, same seat height. Both equipped with fenders, rack, etc. And your other assumption about the superiority of internal gear hubs also has to be challenged as long as I am in this text input field. IGH hubs are expensive, heavy, complex and most cannot withstand much abuse. Very few IGH are designed with more than a single chainring in mind. I believe the Rolhoff is stronger than most, but that isn't saying much. I don't know the exact numbers, but I am pretty certain that a 50/39/30 triple crank, plus 11/34 cassette, has a wider gear range than the Roloff with a single ring and in some situations you will void the Rolloff warranty if you have a triple setup up front.

IGH are more efficient in certain gears than others. Derailleurs are more or less equally efficient in all gears and that efficiency is rarely less than 94%. In more than 100 years of development there still isn't anything approaching that kind of efficiency, and yet the derailleur system is utterly simple. I don't do anything special for my drivetrains. I'm much too lazy. The regimen you describe that maintains your derailleur systems is overkill. Way too much work. That is what is turning you off. I fear you will be disappointed when/if you go over to IGH.

I'm sure I am overdoing it with cleaning, I trust you are correct in that regard, I guess I'm just anal that way . Also, I never stopped to consider driveline efficiency when it comes to hubs, I always assumed direct contact gears would be more efficient, and that an internal hub bathed in oil would have fewer potential friction issues than a chain/cassette setup, but I am uneducated in that field. I would not want to switch to a hub unless I was able to have at least a 2 speed front hub/ring. I care less about the number of gears I have, and more about the gaps in the ratios. This will likely change over the months as my legs get stronger, and the ratios are purposeful in their spacing. If I had my way right NOW, getting back into the riding game after 11 years, I would have 2-tooth gaps through 6th gear as the long climbs kill me. I don't cruise at 35mph on flats, so I would rather have close ratios between cogs 1-6 and a bigger jump after, than how my current setup is. Luckily the Tiagra 4700 listed on the JC-70 spec sheet has closer ratios in the middle than my Acera 8 speed on the DF, so it should definitely be an improvement. My legs will be the biggest improvement I can make, no matter the ratios, so I just have to be patient for that.
Aimulator64 is offline  
Old 06-09-21, 10:38 AM
  #13  
Aimulator64
Don't forget to look up!
Thread Starter
 
Aimulator64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 267

Bikes: Raleigh Route 2, Motobecane Sprint Ultegra, Performer JC-70 Recumbent Trike (soon)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
The regimen you describe that maintains your derailleur systems is overkill.
I should probably clarify. My rides are in the 20-40 mile range and on multiple surfaces. Spring and fall are when the roads are absolutely disgusting where I ride, summer is when they clean the roads and they tend to switch to being sandy rather than muddy/rusty/salty. But I would say I am currently cleaning/degreasing/oiling every 80-150 miles on average. It only takes me about 10 miles before I can hear the road grit in my chain, and I use dry lube. I may still be going overboard. I ride 1-2 times a week for a long period of time on back roads and railway bed trails. I plan to ride the trike into the winter as well, which I don't do with my 2 wheelers, and the salt is going to be hell on the derailleurs and cogs without constant cleaning.

This type of riding is why I ordered the Trike. Even 2 hours in the saddle is uncomfortable, and I keep my weekend rides shorter than I want because of that, and the soreness in my wrists and back. I plan on going everywhere
Aimulator64 is offline  
Old 06-09-21, 01:53 PM
  #14  
VegasTriker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sin City, Nevada
Posts: 2,462

Bikes: Catrike 700, Greenspeed GTO trike, , Linear LWB recumbent, Haluzak Horizon SWB recumbent, Balance 450 MTB, Cannondale SM800 Beast of the East

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 402 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 100 Times in 78 Posts
Back in the days when I lived in a place where it actually rained I always had a beater bike to ride when the roads were covered with crud (rain or snow). That meant that my Motobecane Le Champion road bike rarely got wet and almost never was exposed to road salt. I had it for years with few repairs beyond normal maintenance. Something you may not have considered but the small front wheels on a tadpole trike are great for kicking up a spray on wet pavement. Fenders help but don't eliminate it. It's especially bad when turning because the wheels aim the spray right at you. I don't ride my trike in the rain. One side effect out here in the desert is buildup of road grime. Right after it begins to rain, the streets are as slick as snot on a glass topped table and the first release of road grime in a rainstorm will ruin your clothing. You never get all of it out.
VegasTriker is offline  
Old 06-09-21, 02:35 PM
  #15  
Aimulator64
Don't forget to look up!
Thread Starter
 
Aimulator64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 267

Bikes: Raleigh Route 2, Motobecane Sprint Ultegra, Performer JC-70 Recumbent Trike (soon)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by VegasTriker View Post
Back in the days when I lived in a place where it actually rained I always had a beater bike to ride when the roads were covered with crud (rain or snow). That meant that my Motobecane Le Champion road bike rarely got wet and almost never was exposed to road salt. I had it for years with few repairs beyond normal maintenance. Something you may not have considered but the small front wheels on a tadpole trike are great for kicking up a spray on wet pavement. Fenders help but don't eliminate it. It's especially bad when turning because the wheels aim the spray right at you. I don't ride my trike in the rain. One side effect out here in the desert is buildup of road grime. Right after it begins to rain, the streets are as slick as snot on a glass topped table and the first release of road grime in a rainstorm will ruin your clothing. You never get all of it out.

I hear ya there. Unfortunately with my need to keep a day job and adventure on weekends/vacations, I don't always have enough time to wait out the rain. On any tour of a few hundred miles or more, I am bound to encounter unavoidable messes. Aside from that, I try not to ride in rain if I have other options. Just yesterday I went on a 15 mile loop, started with sun, it decided to downpour 3/4 of my way through, my face was drenched in road crud. I anticipate being disgusting from those front wheels, unless I make my own fender extenders.
Aimulator64 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.