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My actiobent jetstream II is nearly complete!

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My actiobent jetstream II is nearly complete!

Old 04-03-06, 11:52 AM
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blknwhtfoto
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My actiobent jetstream II is nearly complete!

Hey there guys,
I received my Jetstream II last monday(but I had to stay in portland for the whole week because of family issues), so a week later I started building. I put the right side pedal in the left side, noticed the "L" stamped on one and realized my mistake(and the reason for all the issues I had made for myself installing the pedal). I worked my way through installing the derailleurs and cables. Much of this is new to me. Right now, all the components are installed(with very few thread stripping nightmares). My handlebars are set up(they are a bit too narrow for me, I'm talking with a metalworking buddy about building me some new ones, a bit wider and taller than the current). My only issue is the chain...I am not sure about the path it should take(there are two black tubes, neither of which is tightened down, on purpose?). Also, does the chain go under or over the idler? There is a small'ish bracket under the idler that could hold the chain, but I'm not positive. Also, when I received the chain, the pin was pushed all the way out, and I don't know how to reassemble it. My two roomates and I spent about two hours trying to wrangle the chain, one holding the tension'ing bracket on the rear derailleur(the one with the two sprockets) another holding the chain before those damn tubes so it wouldn't slip through, and the third trying to get the damn thing together. It didn't work. Any advice before I take it to my LBS(who I am sure will laugh at me, they are not cool, but the nearest one is about two miles and a half off the bus line and with no bike that sucks).

Also, the wheels I received had very little grease(not even enough to get my fingers greasy when putting the skewers through). Should I put more grease in? Also, is there any advantage to presta valves over schraeder? They just seem to be way too complex for my tastes.
I got a mirror for free from a buddy at an LBS in portland(my home city,I'm at Uni now), I also was given an AirZound airhorn as an early birthday present(which was given to me at 7;30 this morning, guh, its loud!)

Sorry for the Giantpost but I am stoked for my bike!
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Old 04-03-06, 12:55 PM
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jeff-o
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OK, I'll bite:

1. The idler. The top chain (the part of the chain closest to the seat) goes through one of the tubes, then goes UNDER the idler. The smallish bracket goes over the bottom half of the idler, and prevents the chain from coming loose. The bottom chain also goes through its own tube, but does not touch the idler.

2. The pin is supposed to be pushed out. This is so that you can insert the other end of the chain, and push the pin back in. You do this using the chain tool. It's the silver doohickey with a screw running through the middle. Here is how you attach the chain:

a) You must first figure out how much chain you need. Adjust the boom to your leg length, and tighten it down. Shift both the front and rear derailleurs into the largest gears.

b) Run the chain around the gears. For the ideal chain length (ie. you are able to use all the gears), the rear derailleur must be pulled forward so that it makes about a 40 degree angle with the ground. If the two ends of the chain overlap when the derailleur is pulled forward, then you will need to remove some links from the chain. If the two ends don't meet, then you will need to add a few links to the chain. If they meet up exactly (which is unlikely) then all you have to do is join the ends.

c) Measure with a ruler, the excess or missing length of chain. Then release the rear derailleur, and shift into the smallest gears (this makes the work easier). If you have excess chain, you will use the chain tool to push a pin out, to break off a few links. Using the measurement from before, go to the point where you'll need to separate the chain. Align the screw in the chain tool with the pin on the chain, and slowly turn the screw so the pin is pushed out. Take your time, and make sure they stay perfectly aligned. Don't push the pin all the way out though, just push enough out that the chain will separate.

d) If you need to add some links, you'll have to locate some more. Maybe your bike shipped with extra, maybe it didn't. If not, you'll have to go to a bike shop and ask for a chunk of chain that matches what you've got. They probably won't laugh at you for needing a bit more chain, but they might charge you fo it. While you're there, you might even want to have them do the work for you.

e) To join the ends of chain together, you will use the same chain tool, to push the pin back in. Join the two ends together in the chain tool, so the screw is alighned with the pin. Slowly turn the screw so the pin is pushed through the two ends of the chain, joining them together. Push the pin far enough that it is even on both sides of the chain. Also, be careful when you do this step! If the two halves of the chain are not parallel, you could risk destroying the link.

(if you have any more questions regarding the use of the chain tool, ask them here or feel free to email me)

3. The skewers. Don't add more grease, they don't need it! The wheels turn on their own bearings, the skewers are just there to hold the wheels in the fork.

4. Presta vs. Schraeder. Advantages? Nothing major, really. All you need to know is, that presta valves are more fragile than schraeder, so be careful when you inflate them. Use a pump with a flexible hose. Be sure to screw down the top of the valve before putting the plastic cap back on. There is an adapter available that screws onto the presta valve, that lets you use schraeder-only inflation systems (like the air hose at a gas station) to inflate your tire. You can get it at any bike shop.

Any other questions? Feel free to ask...

- Jeff
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Old 04-03-06, 02:42 PM
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Thanks very much Jeff. I really appreciate it. I have class/work till 8. Then I'm going home and working on "Pickle"(the name of my bike). WoooHoooo I'm stoked
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Old 04-03-06, 06:59 PM
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You just know your friends are gonna make fun of that name. It's just so easy!
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Old 04-04-06, 06:32 PM
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yeah yeah yeah, I was thinking "Granny Smith" cause its apple green, but Pickle has a bit more flare. If you talk with me longer than the niceties, than you'll realize that an odd bit of humor is always at home in my mind. Also, my buddies are all tiny, and I'm a giant(6'5 and 260 lbs), not that I'd hurt the midgets, but I've been known to threaten.hehehe. I'm more of an Andre(thegiant) sort of giant. "I can't kill the man in black, he seems so nice"(Andre The Giant in Princess Brides)
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Old 04-04-06, 09:12 PM
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jeff-o
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Well, have you had a chance to ride it yet?
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Old 04-05-06, 04:35 AM
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Well, have you had a chance to ride it yet?
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