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Wider 25C tire on front or rear?

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Wider 25C tire on front or rear?

Old 03-28-15, 06:40 PM
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Shmile
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Wider 25C tire on front or rear?

Needed to replace 1 tire so decided to try a 700x25C. Currently running 700x23C on front & rear. So, until I need another tire, should I install the new wider tire on the front or rear?
Thanks for your help!
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Old 03-28-15, 06:57 PM
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Front.
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Old 03-28-15, 06:57 PM
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New one always goes to the front for me (moving the old one from the front to back, if my rear tyre is the one that needs changing).
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Old 03-28-15, 07:37 PM
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If you're rotating tires, rotate front to back, however, if your tires are different sizes, you'd most likely put the bigger one on the back.
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Old 03-28-15, 07:39 PM
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It's actually the front that needs replacing, but since I bought a wider tire I wasn't sure if it should go on the front or rear.
thanks!
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Old 03-28-15, 08:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Shmile
It's actually the front that needs replacing, but since I bought a wider tire I wasn't sure if it should go on the front or rear.
thanks!
Put the wider tire in the front.
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Old 03-28-15, 08:31 PM
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Both front and rear will benefit from a 25c compared to 23 since they actually roll faster. But in the front is were you'll feel more grip when cornering so I'd say front.
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Old 03-28-15, 08:31 PM
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Thank you for the help. Looks like I have 2 opposite recommendations here thus far. So Why front? or why rear?
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Old 03-28-15, 09:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Shmile
Looks like I have 2 opposite recommendations here thus far.
Correct
Cycle Tyres and Tubes
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Old 03-28-15, 11:17 PM
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Put it on the rear, the tires will wear more evenly, and you can run similar pressures
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Old 03-28-15, 11:21 PM
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I put it on front if I sometimes ride on dirt or otherwise looser or rougher surface where I want better traction in front. Otherwise the wider tire goes in back.
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Old 03-28-15, 11:42 PM
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The fatter tire always goes in the back...

Just because it looks better...

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Old 03-29-15, 12:14 AM
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What condition is your current front tire in? If it is in bad shape, then rotate the front to the rear, and mount the new tire on the front.

If the front (other 23mm tire) is in good condition, then personally i would go with the wide in the back, and narrow in the front as the weight distribution and wear is greater in the rear.

If the goal is to just grind down 500 to 100 miles on the other 23mm tire, then replace, then put that tire on the rear for the final wear.

I suppose another argument for a fat front is shock absorbing which may be more pertinent to your hands, arms and shoulders than to your seat.
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Old 03-29-15, 12:49 AM
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Yeah, where to put 25c tire depends on goals.

More confident handling? Front

More comfort? Rear

Biding time until other 23c wears? Front

Biding time until you can get another 25c? Rear

Looks? Rear
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Old 03-29-15, 04:01 AM
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Originally Posted by chaadster
Yeah, where to put 25c tire depends on goals.

More confident handling? Front

More comfort? Rear

Biding time until other 23c wears? Front

Biding time until you can get another 25c? Rear

Looks? Rear
+1
Well explained.

Rear tyre carries more weight, so it makes sense putting a fatter tyre at the rear, if the width of tyres used is bare minimum for rider's weight. In all other circumstances, it comes down to comfort and grip. With all things being equal (tyre compound, thread pattern etc), fatter tyre provides better traction. Up to a point at least.

Comparison with motor sports is not valid, since the reason for using fatter tyres there is in order to prevent excessive heat and wear, those are 100+ bhp machines, going at 100+ mph.


My policy is that the front tyre is crucial for control and stability (and staying upright without falling), so I always put the better (newer) tyre up front. If the rear one fails suddenly, it is much less dangerous and will probably not result in a fall.


One more thing: 23 mm tyres are good for racing, they make some sense for super quality pavement. For all other practical purpouses, I'd recommend 25 as minimum, 28 mm being even better (I ride 28s).
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Old 03-29-15, 06:22 AM
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Since I'm trying to optimize comfort and even out the wear between tires, I run 23's front, 25's rear.
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Old 03-29-15, 06:36 AM
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Rear. It will seem like you are riding down hill more. Actually you probably couldn't tell the difference short of using a spirit level.

I'd put it on the rear for comfort and the fact that rear tires wear out quicker. That way maybe the front and rear will wear out about the same time.
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Old 03-29-15, 06:40 AM
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Originally Posted by JerrySTL

I'd put it on the rear for comfort and the fact that rear tires wear out quicker. That way maybe the front and rear will wear out about the same time.
And that will gain you... what exactly?
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Old 03-29-15, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Slaninar
+1

My policy is that the front tyre is crucial for control and stability (and staying upright without falling), so I always put the better (newer) tyre up front. If the rear one fails suddenly, it is much less dangerous and will probably not result in a fall.
I really don't get this. You've been riding with the tire on the front for hundreds if not thousands of miles, why worry that its going to spontaneously disintegrate now? I'll usually go through tires in sets of 3. Rear wears faster, so I'll replace it when it wears down, and when the second rear wears down, its about time for the front. If you are constantly rotating the new tire to the front, you either end up with mismatched tires or you end up locked into a brand/model for a long time.
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Old 03-29-15, 07:59 AM
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Originally Posted by redlude97
I really don't get this. You've been riding with the tire on the front for hundreds if not thousands of miles, why worry that its going to spontaneously disintegrate now? I'll usually go through tires in sets of 3. Rear wears faster, so I'll replace it when it wears down, and when the second rear wears down, its about time for the front. If you are constantly rotating the new tire to the front, you either end up with mismatched tires or you end up locked into a brand/model for a long time.
The rule is, newest tire on the front. Yes, the back wears out more quickly, which is why when that happens and assuming you don't want to replace both tires, rotate the old front tire to the back and put the new tire on the front.
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Old 03-29-15, 08:05 AM
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Originally Posted by MRT2
The rule is, newest tire on the front. Yes, the back wears out more quickly, which is why when that happens and assuming you don't want to replace both tires, rotate the old front tire to the back and put the new tire on the front.
Huh? I know what the "rule" is. I don't get why its a "rule".
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Old 03-29-15, 08:08 AM
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Originally Posted by redlude97
I really don't get this. You've been riding with the tire on the front for hundreds if not thousands of miles, why worry that its going to spontaneously disintegrate now? I'll usually go through tires in sets of 3. Rear wears faster, so I'll replace it when it wears down, and when the second rear wears down, its about time for the front. If you are constantly rotating the new tire to the front, you either end up with mismatched tires or you end up locked into a brand/model for a long time.
My rear goes in around 6000 km. Front is good for another 3-4 thousand. It is half worn. I put the half worn tyre at the back, to wear it out completely, and put a new tyre up front. That way I always have new, or half-worn tyre in the front.

Tyres last as long as they would with swapping them, the only difference is I never have 2 tyres of the same mileage and I never have a 90% worn tyre on the front wheel.
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Old 03-29-15, 08:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Slaninar
My rear goes in around 6000 km. Front is good for another 3-4 thousand. It is half worn. I put the half worn tyre at the back, to wear it out completely, and put a new tyre up front. That way I always have new, or half-worn tyre in the front.

Tyres last as long as they would with swapping them, the only difference is I never have 2 tyres of the same mileage and I never have a 90% worn tyre on the front wheel.
Which is fine if you never change brands/makes. Otherwise you end up with mismatched tires at some point.
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Old 03-29-15, 08:11 AM
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Originally Posted by redlude97
Huh? I know what the "rule" is. I don't get why its a "rule".
Sheldon Brown explains it here. Tire Rotation
"The reason for this is that the front tire is much more critical for safety than the rear, so you should have the more reliable tire on the front.If you have a blowout, if it is on the rear tire, you have a very good chance of bringing the bike to a controlled stop. If your front tire blows, you can lose steering control, and a crash is a real possibility."
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Old 03-29-15, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by MRT2
Sheldon Brown explains it here. Tire Rotation
"The reason for this is that the front tire is much more critical for safety than the rear, so you should have the more reliable tire on the front.If you have a blowout, if it is on the rear tire, you have a very good chance of bringing the bike to a controlled stop. If your front tire blows, you can lose steering control, and a crash is a real possibility."
My point is that the fear is overblown. The tire was just on the front, if the rear didn't wear out would you worry that it will fail all of a sudden?
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