Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

March of the Road Discs continues...

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

March of the Road Discs continues...

Old 03-31-15, 12:59 PM
  #1  
UnfilteredDregs
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
UnfilteredDregs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: NYC, duh Bronx.
Posts: 3,578

Bikes: Salsa Ti Warbird- 2014/ November RAIL52s

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 67 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
March of the Road Discs continues...

Shimano doubles down...



"There has been a lot of speculation since Shimano first announced a new brake mount specific to road, but little in the way of details. Ironically coming on April 1st in Japan, Shimano is finally showing their hand and introducing two new hydraulic road disc brakes built specifically for the Flat Mount fitment. Announced along with a new 10 speed Tiagra group and WH-RX010 road disc wheelset, the new BR-RS505 and BR-RS805 disc brakes are non-series components at the 105 and Ultegra level respectively.

We have a feeling we’ll be learning more about these new brakes come Sea Otter, but the preliminary details are after the break…"



Beneficial to both the frame and the caliper design, Flat Mount uses an all new caliper that bolts up from the bottom instead of through the top like most calipers. On the rear brake that results in a true “Flat Mount” with the caliper sitting directly on the chainstay. Caliper mounting bolts are inserted through the bottom of the chainstay and thread into the caliper making a very tidy rear triangle of the frame. While the mounting and shape of the caliper changes, the brakes still use one-way bleeding with a bleed nipple at the highest point in the caliper’s hydraulic workings.



Due to the fact that the caliper bolts up through the bottom, the front brake will still need an adapter which is then bolted to the back side of the fork leg. Shimano tells us that you can still use additional adapters to run larger rotors while the brakes are capable of running 140mm.





Visually, there is little difference between the BR-RS505 (105 level) and BR-RS805 (Utlegra Level), other than the finish. We wouldn’t be surprised to find that there is more to it beneath the surface though. Both calipers will use new brake pads which are not mountain bike compatible, likely meant for much higher heat applications.



Completing the RS-505 level hydraulic system is the new ST-RS505 hydraulic/mechanical shift lever which brings Shimano’s hydraulic road performance down to the most affordable level yet. Compatible with either of the new Flat Mount disc calipers or even previous Shimano hydraulic road calipers, the 11 speed mechanical shift lever with Vivid Indexing includes reach and free stroke adjustments as well.



As promised, frames equipped with the new Flat Mount standard will still be able to run standard road brake calipers with one of the Shimano adapters. That means frames will be backwards compatible, but the new Flat Mount brakes will not be since they can only be mounted to frames with the Flat Mount provisions.



Along with the ST-RS505 brake levers, the RS505 system includes a new 105 level Centerlock hubset to facilitate custom wheel builds that are 11 speed road disc compatible.



The Flat Mount brakes will continue to use the current Shimano Centerlock rotors with the SM-RT81 and SM-RT99 Freeza rotors available down to 140mm.

We’ll update the story as pricing and weights become available."
UnfilteredDregs is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 01:22 PM
  #2  
Dave Mayer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,798
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 592 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Boring. When I am hauling 50 pounds of camping gear down steep grades on tour, I may be interested in disks.

Wonder how much extra weight has to be added to the frame for the mounts? Plus extra for the brake calipers.... I have looked over a few disk-compatible road bikes at our local shops. Despite expensive carbon frames and high-end components, they are heavy pigs.

BTW: Year to date I've ridden 80 days on carbon rims. Using rim brakes - in the rain. Despite some major descents (my main route drops 500 vertical feet in 5 blocks), I've had no problems.
Dave Mayer is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 01:36 PM
  #3  
bt
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,664
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
fugly and un-needed.

Both calipers will use new brake pads which are not mountain bike compatible, likely meant for much higher heat applications.
lolz
bt is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 01:37 PM
  #4  
cale
Senior Member
 
cale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,250

Bikes: Kuota Ksano. Litespeed T5 gravel - brilliant!

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
It's exciting to see this innovation in bike braking take place for road bikes. I like the sleek caliper shape and the hydraulic system suggests that the modulation and self-centering aspects of the brakes will be up to snuff too.

If you're counting grams, like the poster above, I doubt you'll be impressed with these brakes. But entry level racers (as soon as they get the go ahead) are going to enjoy better braking and I think it will make for better racing. Another group that will benefit are commuters, a growing segment among alternative forms of transportation. I think they will benefit from the instantaneous application of the brakes in wet and muddy conditions. It is confidence inspiring when there's no waiting for the brakes to grab.

Thanks for posting the announcement.
cale is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 01:42 PM
  #5  
Lazyass
Senior Member
 
Lazyass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 8,171

Bikes: Vintage steel, aluminum, modern carbon disc, single speed, MTB's, the works

Mentioned: 58 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1910 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Lazyass is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 01:52 PM
  #6  
bt
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,664
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by cale View Post
and self-centering aspects of the brakes will be up to snuff too.
self centering?

I don't think so.

pads retracting equally doesn't equate to "self centering".
bt is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 01:54 PM
  #7  
cale
Senior Member
 
cale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,250

Bikes: Kuota Ksano. Litespeed T5 gravel - brilliant!

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bt View Post
self centering?

I don't think so.

pads retracting equally doesn't equate to "self centering".
Why don't you add something positive?
cale is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 01:56 PM
  #8  
svtmike
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,745

Bikes: S-Works Roubaix SL2^H4, Secteur Sport, TriCross, Kaffenback, Lurcher 29er

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
(my main route drops 500 vertical feet in 5 blocks)
Your main route must be up and down Filbert Street in San Francisco.
svtmike is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 02:29 PM
  #9  
UnfilteredDregs
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
UnfilteredDregs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: NYC, duh Bronx.
Posts: 3,578

Bikes: Salsa Ti Warbird- 2014/ November RAIL52s

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 67 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bt View Post
fugly and un-needed.



lolz
Originally Posted by Lazyass View Post
I can see you two in a room together...and a bucket of squealout.


Last edited by UnfilteredDregs; 03-31-15 at 02:39 PM.
UnfilteredDregs is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 02:37 PM
  #10  
UnfilteredDregs
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
UnfilteredDregs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: NYC, duh Bronx.
Posts: 3,578

Bikes: Salsa Ti Warbird- 2014/ November RAIL52s

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 67 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bt View Post
self centering?

I don't think so.

pads retracting equally doesn't equate to "self centering".
Sigh...this is getting so boring. Hydraulic disc brakes are self centering, they maintain the pad to rotor gap as the pads wear down.

Next.
UnfilteredDregs is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 02:39 PM
  #11  
RJM
I'm doing it wrong.
 
RJM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,854

Bikes: Trek Remedy 9.8, Rivendell Appaloosa, Kona Jake the Snake CR, Trek Fuel Ex, Riv Atlantis, Niner Sir9, Trek Crockett

Mentioned: 67 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6145 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by Lazyass View Post
lolz


I hope they are better than my xt brakes on my mountain bike, which squeal almost every ride.
RJM is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 03:54 PM
  #12  
bt
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,664
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by UnfilteredDregs View Post
Sigh...this is getting so boring. Hydraulic disc brakes are self centering, they maintain the pad to rotor gap as the pads wear down.

Next.
false.

if the caliper isn't centered, you unscrew the mounting bolts and center it over the rotor.

the pads may retract the same amount equal to the previous protrusion cycle, but that isn't self centering.
bt is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 04:19 PM
  #13  
UnfilteredDregs
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
UnfilteredDregs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: NYC, duh Bronx.
Posts: 3,578

Bikes: Salsa Ti Warbird- 2014/ November RAIL52s

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 67 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bt View Post
false.

if the caliper isn't centered, you unscrew the mounting bolts and center it over the rotor.

the pads may retract the same amount equal to the previous protrusion cycle, but that isn't self centering.
If the caliper isn't aligned to clear the rotor the brakes haven't been installed correctly.

Hydraulic systems maintain the pad to rotor gap, otherwise known in the common parlance when speaking of hydraulic disc brakes as "self-centering."

but..you'd argue the semantics because..that's you. take it up with Lennard Zinn, I'm sure your opinion would carry great weight.

Kinda like parkways & driveways genius.

Last edited by UnfilteredDregs; 03-31-15 at 04:34 PM.
UnfilteredDregs is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 06:37 PM
  #14  
Stucky
Old Fart
 
Stucky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Bumpkinsville
Posts: 3,350

Bikes: '97 Klein Quantum '16 Gravity Knockout

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 162 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yawn...

Boiy, that crap looks heavy! Looks like what it mounts to must be beefed-up and heavy, too.....

You'd think we were riding mountainous hairpin switchbacks at 200MPH, instead of 17 lb. bicycles at 20MPH...... Gee...how did we manage to stop for the last 50 years? I've lived with coaster brakes; I've lived with steel rims with rim brakes; alloy wheels with dual-pivots is all the brakes I'll ever need....
Stucky is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 06:45 PM
  #15  
bgav
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Central MA
Posts: 171
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Don't knock hydro road-disc til you try it...
bgav is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 06:50 PM
  #16  
datlas 
Beyond Bogus
 
datlas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Malvern, PA (20 miles West of Philly)
Posts: 28,305

Bikes: 1986 Alpine (steel road bike), 2009 Ti Habenero, 2013 Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 386 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8548 Post(s)
Liked 95 Times in 57 Posts
March of the Road Discs continues...into April?

Just wondering...
__________________
Originally Posted by RUOkie View Post
never underestimate the idiocy of BF.
Originally Posted by rjones28 View Post
Addiction is all about class.
Originally Posted by seedsbelize View Post
Better to just stay out of the 41
datlas is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 06:57 PM
  #17  
Psimet2001 
I eat carbide.
 
Psimet2001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Elgin, IL
Posts: 20,593

Bikes: Lots. Van Dessel and Squid Dealer

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 600 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by UnfilteredDregs View Post
Sigh...this is getting so boring. Hydraulic disc brakes are self centering, they maintain the pad to rotor gap as the pads wear down.

Next.
More accurately - they compensate for pad wear.

This is what made disc brakes even remotely viable for cyclocross. With the mechanical setups the pads would wear too quickly on muddy courses and the pads wouldn't compensate like they do on hydraulic meaning that the pads just got further and further from the rotor leaving the racers without any brakes within a lap or two.

Timely post. I was about to pickup a set of road hydraulic Di2 for my latest show/demo bike. Guess I'll wait. Better hit soon or else I'll just end up on SRAM wireless/Hydraulic disc road group when it's finally available later in the year.
__________________
PSIMET Wheels, PSIMET Racing, PSIMET Neutral Race Support, and 11 Jackson Coffee
Podcast - YouTube Channel
Video about PSIMET Wheels

Psimet2001 is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 07:09 PM
  #18  
Psimet2001 
I eat carbide.
 
Psimet2001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Elgin, IL
Posts: 20,593

Bikes: Lots. Van Dessel and Squid Dealer

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 600 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by Stucky View Post
Yawn...

Boiy, that crap looks heavy! Looks like what it mounts to must be beefed-up and heavy, too.....

You'd think we were riding mountainous hairpin switchbacks at 200MPH, instead of 17 lb. bicycles at 20MPH...... Gee...how did we manage to stop for the last 50 years? I've lived with coaster brakes; I've lived with steel rims with rim brakes; alloy wheels with dual-pivots is all the brakes I'll ever need....
My cross bike complete with SRAM CX1 hydraulic disc weighs in at 16 lbs.

Disc overkill? Absolutely. As a wheelbuilder - gotta say I prefer how disc brake wheel fare, but I can always build a lighter rim brake wheel of course.

I guess I understand the hesitation, but here's the basics - you can't fight it. The whole industry is going disc. I can't fight it and I am in the industry. So - get used to it. Also: riding disc on the road, even at human speeds, is actually a LOT of fun. A whole helluva lot more fun than I thought it would be. More control overall.

Needed? No, but then again we really didn't need to change from the old school canti's either. I mean they stopped us. Same with Friction shifting....it shifted.... etc.
__________________
PSIMET Wheels, PSIMET Racing, PSIMET Neutral Race Support, and 11 Jackson Coffee
Podcast - YouTube Channel
Video about PSIMET Wheels

Psimet2001 is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 07:59 PM
  #19  
Stucky
Old Fart
 
Stucky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Bumpkinsville
Posts: 3,350

Bikes: '97 Klein Quantum '16 Gravity Knockout

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 162 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Psimet2001 View Post
My cross bike complete with SRAM CX1 hydraulic disc weighs in at 16 lbs.

Disc overkill? Absolutely. As a wheelbuilder - gotta say I prefer how disc brake wheel fare, but I can always build a lighter rim brake wheel of course.

I guess I understand the hesitation, but here's the basics - you can't fight it. The whole industry is going disc. I can't fight it and I am in the industry. So - get used to it. Also: riding disc on the road, even at human speeds, is actually a LOT of fun. A whole helluva lot more fun than I thought it would be. More control overall.

Needed? No, but then again we really didn't need to change from the old school canti's either. I mean they stopped us. Same with Friction shifting....it shifted.... etc.
It may be where the industry's going (and I have no quarrel for MTB and CX, BTW)- but it's not where a lot of consumers (like myself) want to go- which tells me it will likely be a passing fad; like suspension forks for roadbikes a-la 1992.

Personally, my next bike will have downtube shifters (Whether friction or indexed, I don't care). As the industry is pushing electronic shifting and discs and such other BS., I'm wanting to return to the simple basics. Can't predict the future, but I've often been a good indicator of (in other spheres of endeavor) of what the market will do in a few years. Sometimes I'm ahead of my time; other times, I just represent a solid niche. We shall see; but just going by what i see on these forums, I'm not sensing an overall warm reception of discs by the mid and high-end road bike market. The industry's trying to dictate to the market, rather than serving it. That's not good for the industry. That often signals a major change in players.
Stucky is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 08:45 PM
  #20  
lkngro
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 85
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
This isn't a "good" or "bad" thing that disc brakes are becoming more popular. It's just preference. If you want something lighter, go with calipers. If you want more braking control/power, go with discs. Shimano is just adding to the available options for people who prefer discs and attempting to make it as good as a product as possible.
lkngro is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 09:20 PM
  #21  
cale
Senior Member
 
cale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,250

Bikes: Kuota Ksano. Litespeed T5 gravel - brilliant!

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Sometime ago, the "industry" pushed for helmet safety. A lot of people pushed back, including many if not most at BF. You'll get too hot! It will make you slower climbing (aerodynamics?). You look ugly wearing one. Driven by consumer interest in safety (cars were already getting much safer), national helmet awareness campaigns and local regulations regarding the use of helmets by children drove helmet popularity to the point where the bicycling elite, could no longer ignore the trend. If the helmet trend is temporary, it is having a good long run.

This really isn't so different than the trend towards road bikes with disc brakes. Consumers understand what it means to purchase safety features and that sort of thing remains important in the purchase of any transportation vehicle. Even one used primarily for recreational purposes. Besides, they are really fun to use. After an initial adjustment to their feel, the rider will enjoy greater confidence which translates into more enjoyable downhill rides and confidence in traffic, just to name a couple places riders gain some benefit.
cale is offline  
Old 03-31-15, 09:29 PM
  #22  
Psimet2001 
I eat carbide.
 
Psimet2001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Elgin, IL
Posts: 20,593

Bikes: Lots. Van Dessel and Squid Dealer

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 600 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by Stucky View Post
It may be where the industry's going (and I have no quarrel for MTB and CX, BTW)- but it's not where a lot of consumers (like myself) want to go- which tells me it will likely be a passing fad; like suspension forks for roadbikes a-la 1992.

Personally, my next bike will have downtube shifters (Whether friction or indexed, I don't care). As the industry is pushing electronic shifting and discs and such other BS., I'm wanting to return to the simple basics. Can't predict the future, but I've often been a good indicator of (in other spheres of endeavor) of what the market will do in a few years. Sometimes I'm ahead of my time; other times, I just represent a solid niche. We shall see; but just going by what i see on these forums, I'm not sensing an overall warm reception of discs by the mid and high-end road bike market. The industry's trying to dictate to the market, rather than serving it. That's not good for the industry. That often signals a major change in players.
In a few years there will be a niche segment where hand builders and custom guys like us will harken back to the old vintage caliper brakes and what was old will be new again.

If you're set on being a Luddite/retro grouch then I bought a bike shop last year that is simply full of stuff you'd love to buy from me. It's like taking a trip down memory lane with each shelf.....but it's all still there for a reason. While it may be simple, durable and elegant: no one wants to buy it.

As for suspension forks on road in 92 - no....disc is nothing even remotely like that. There are production frames already on the floor made by most of the industry's largest manufacturers. All of the component OEMs have focused on developing top tier disc components and the UCI is voting on disc use in road. It is already legal for road and Crit use in USA Cycling events. I lived through top end road racing in 92 and couldn't tell you 2 or even 3 real major production road bikes that had them. They were more of an oddity. Like drop in bars. Or power cranks. Nothing more.
__________________
PSIMET Wheels, PSIMET Racing, PSIMET Neutral Race Support, and 11 Jackson Coffee
Podcast - YouTube Channel
Video about PSIMET Wheels

Psimet2001 is offline  
Old 04-01-15, 09:17 AM
  #23  
Stucky
Old Fart
 
Stucky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Bumpkinsville
Posts: 3,350

Bikes: '97 Klein Quantum '16 Gravity Knockout

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 162 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cale View Post
Sometime ago, the "industry" pushed for helmet safety. A lot of people pushed back, including many if not most at BF. You'll get too hot! It will make you slower climbing (aerodynamics?). You look ugly wearing one. Driven by consumer interest in safety (cars were already getting much safer), national helmet awareness campaigns and local regulations regarding the use of helmets by children drove helmet popularity to the point where the bicycling elite, could no longer ignore the trend. If the helmet trend is temporary, it is having a good long run.

This really isn't so different than the trend towards road bikes with disc brakes. Consumers understand what it means to purchase safety features and that sort of thing remains important in the purchase of any transportation vehicle. Even one used primarily for recreational purposes. Besides, they are really fun to use. After an initial adjustment to their feel, the rider will enjoy greater confidence which translates into more enjoyable downhill rides and confidence in traffic, just to name a couple places riders gain some benefit.
Bad analogy- as helmets offer some actual benefit; and did not require the adoption of new standards in bike frames and components. Conversely, how many cycling accidents are caused because of inadequate braking? I'd bet very, very few. In-fact, I'd guess that more are caused by over-zealous use of brakes/grabbing too much in panic situations....and such incidents will actually increase if discs become common [So next, they'll probably start putting anti-lock brake systems on bikes! -Where does it end? All to solve a problem which doesn't exist for 98% of road cyclists; just to stimulate sales.)
Stucky is offline  
Old 04-01-15, 10:14 AM
  #24  
cale
Senior Member
 
cale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,250

Bikes: Kuota Ksano. Litespeed T5 gravel - brilliant!

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Stucky View Post
Bad analogy- as helmets offer some actual benefit; and did not require the adoption of new standards in bike frames and components. Conversely, how many cycling accidents are caused because of inadequate braking? I'd bet very, very few. In-fact, I'd guess that more are caused by over-zealous use of brakes/grabbing too much in panic situations....and such incidents will actually increase if discs become common [So next, they'll probably start putting anti-lock brake systems on bikes! -Where does it end? All to solve a problem which doesn't exist for 98% of road cyclists; just to stimulate sales.)
You start off by saying it is a bad analogy and then claim that disc brakes off no benefits. I've had enough of responding to posters that adamantly state that there are no benefits. Look, if you want to stay with your existing system, that's fine. But you do nothing but stir up trouble with this denial of benefits. Go on then, tell me again how no benefits exist.
cale is offline  
Old 04-01-15, 11:15 AM
  #25  
Psimet2001 
I eat carbide.
 
Psimet2001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Elgin, IL
Posts: 20,593

Bikes: Lots. Van Dessel and Squid Dealer

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 600 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by Stucky View Post
Bad analogy- as helmets offer some actual benefit; and did not require the adoption of new standards in bike frames and components. Conversely, how many cycling accidents are caused because of inadequate braking? I'd bet very, very few. In-fact, I'd guess that more are caused by over-zealous use of brakes/grabbing too much in panic situations....and such incidents will actually increase if discs become common [So next, they'll probably start putting anti-lock brake systems on bikes! -Where does it end? All to solve a problem which doesn't exist for 98% of road cyclists; just to stimulate sales.)
.....and shifting wasn't a "problem" when we had friction shift, downtube shifters and 5 gear freewheels. Resistance to change is normal.
__________________
PSIMET Wheels, PSIMET Racing, PSIMET Neutral Race Support, and 11 Jackson Coffee
Podcast - YouTube Channel
Video about PSIMET Wheels

Psimet2001 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.