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Any experiences with Columbus forks?

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Any experiences with Columbus forks?

Old 04-29-15, 09:04 AM
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Any experiences with Columbus forks?

I'm about to pull the trigger on a Columbus Tusk fork. It comes in at less than 100 with shipping.

Columbus Tusk Carbon Forks Alloy Steerer, Forks, FORKS ROAD

Is this a good fork? Any experiences with Columbus? Also, what's Columbus' warranty like? I could find no info about that on their website.

Finally, what about this fork? It's either this one or the Columbus one.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/BIANCHI-K-Vi...item3f4a3bd002
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Old 04-29-15, 09:06 AM
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Columbus is a good brand, been around forever. Make sure this is the correct dimensions for your frame. I believe this is a 1" steerer.
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Old 04-29-15, 09:13 AM
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Originally Posted by shoota
Columbus is a good brand, been around forever. Make sure this is the correct dimensions for your frame. I believe this is a 1' steerer.
Good point. According to Ribble it's 28.6mm which = 1.125".
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Old 04-29-15, 09:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Deontologist
Good point. According to Ribble it's 28.6mm which = 1.125".
My bad, you are correct. I don't have any details about warranty or whatever but if the fork fits it seems like a good price.

The Bianchi one would be fine too. Heck they might even be the same fork.

I'm curious, what frame is this going in?
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Old 04-29-15, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by shoota
My bad, you are correct. I don't have any details about warranty or whatever but if the fork fits it seems like a good price.

The Bianchi one would be fine too. Heck they might even be the same fork.

I'm curious, what frame is this going in?
A 2005 KHS Flite 700. Well, they do seem like the typical low-end carbon+alloy forks. So probably similar. I'm still leaning toward Ribble since it's an establish seller as opposed to some eBay operation.
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Old 04-29-15, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Deontologist
A 2005 KHS Flite 700. Well, they do seem like the typical low-end carbon+alloy forks. So probably similar. I'm still leaning toward Ribble since it's an establish seller as opposed to some eBay operation.
Well then my vote is for the Columbus fork since the Bianchi wouldn't match.
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Old 04-29-15, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by shoota
Well then my vote is for the Columbus fork since the Bianchi wouldn't match.
Sounds like a good enough reason!

It's sorta hard finding forks now with alloy steerers ... I frankly don't want to bother with carbon steerers and the need for expanding stem caps, the need for careful stem tightening, and the need for inspection every now and then. If anyone has any other recs for carbon/alloy forks I'm open.
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Old 04-29-15, 09:43 AM
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My Cinelli has a Columbus Tusk fork (which is no surprise given the relationship). They are heavy, but stiff, and the whole bike ends up with a brutally stiff but performance oriented feel. I have had no issues with it.
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Old 04-29-15, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Deontologist
Sounds like a good enough reason!

It's sorta hard finding forks now with alloy steerers ... I frankly don't want to bother with carbon steerers and the need for expanding stem caps, the need for careful stem tightening, and the need for inspection every now and then. If anyone has any other recs for carbon/alloy forks I'm open.
I know there are others like Forte (Performance house brand), Nashbar, and Reynolds.
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Old 04-29-15, 11:09 AM
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I concur with Performance and Nashbar, but honestly a carbon steerer is no big deal to work on. The expander plug is a lot easier for me to fool with than a star-fangled nut, that's for sure. But no problem whatever you decide. If you want to spend a little more, the Ritchey Comp fork has the alloy steerer and is excellent. Ritchey forks are top notch.
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Old 04-29-15, 11:38 AM
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Originally Posted by rpenmanparker
I concur with Performance and Nashbar, but honestly a carbon steerer is no big deal to work on. The expander plug is a lot easier for me to fool with than a star-fangled nut, that's for sure. But no problem whatever you decide. If you want to spend a little more, the Ritchey Comp fork has the alloy steerer and is excellent. Ritchey forks are top notch.
Ended up going with the Nashbar fork for 80 dollars after tax. The exchange rate on Ribble was not working in my favor; made the Columbus fork come out to over 130.

Also, aren't some stems incompatible with carbon forks? I have a stem from an alloy steerer fork. I don't know if it's compatible with a carbon fork; the web doesn't say much about this model. I know that there was a big issue involving Trek forks and stems causing a few crashes involving pros a few years ago ... and I'm definitely now more on the cautious side coming out of a crash ...

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