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Has anyone managed to find a solution to tailbone pain?

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Has anyone managed to find a solution to tailbone pain?

Old 05-20-15, 01:48 AM
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Elysium32
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Has anyone managed to find a solution to tailbone pain?

I have visited a doctor but hasnt really received any help to tailbone pain. I got a cream and that's it and was told to go back in a month.

I am wondering if someone here has ever had tailbone pain and found a solution to it? I might start with a 48-hour break from cycling and if the pain doesnt disappear, I leave cycling till it does. I was told the seat needs to be parallel to the ground too. I can tick that. I also try to put most of the pressure on the sit bones....not on the tailbone obviously. I have never had this issue before....wondering why it appears now all of a sudden.

UPDATE: it wasnt tailbone pain. After a series of visits to quack doctors (osteopaths mainly), I found a physiothe****** who explained to me that my left leg was stronger than my right one. He said this was something that I probably had had all my life and it became apparent when I started riding a bike here in Barcelona and that it only added to the problem. So, for two weeks I did exercises to strengthen my right leg and then he asked me to do stretching on a daily basis. The pain is gone now.

Last edited by Elysium32; 09-19-16 at 01:42 AM.
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Old 05-20-15, 03:12 AM
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[h=2]Causes[/h]The repetitive actions of bike riding, especially if it is excessive or for long distances, can trigger tailbone pain. You can also develop pain if you fall off your bike or are bumped from behind by another object. Poor cycling posture or having your bicycle handlebars too high does not allow your tailbone and spine to properly cope with irregularities and bumps in the road -- instead it will just jam your vertebrae together and place pressure on the tailbone. Seek medical attention if symptoms are chronic or severe as tailbone pain can be a symptom of a more serious condition such as an infection, sciatica or a fractured bone.

Tailbone Pain and Bike Riding | LIVESTRONG.COM
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Old 05-20-15, 04:27 AM
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79pmooney
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I have a busted tailbone from 20 years ago. Rarely an issue but was a big problem with the seats Ii used to ride. I now only ride seats with full length grooves (many of the Specialized) or both a cutout (for my aging body) and a wedge shaped depression at the back. For me, the best seat is the Terry Fly on most of my bikes but there are many seats that fit that description. It does however rule out every tradititonal leather seat I have ever seen. Not an issue for me as I cannot ride them comfortably for other reasons.

Ben
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Old 05-20-15, 04:39 AM
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Have you had someone observe your posture while riding? Have you changed your cycling regimen? Have you recently made changes to you bike setup? If your posture on the bike looks ok and there has been no other changes, you should seek medical attention.
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Old 05-20-15, 05:47 AM
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Elysium32
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Originally Posted by Wingsprint View Post
Have you had someone observe your posture while riding? Have you changed your cycling regimen? Have you recently made changes to you bike setup? If your posture on the bike looks ok and there has been no other changes, you should seek medical attention.

Thanks guys for the answer. I have recently changed (well, about 2 months ago) a few things...the main thing was that from a relatively straight back position, I went to a more arched position (by the way..I ride a hybrid with a normal handlebar..trek DS 8.1). Mainly because this pain started...it's been going on for about a month now after an 86-km ride.

I wont ride my bike for about 4 days and see if the pain disappears.
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Old 05-20-15, 05:53 AM
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Interesting. I injured my tailbone many years ago and it can act up and be very painful sitting in office chairs and the like, but cycling hasn't bothered it at all, even after it's hurting from sitting at work.
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Old 05-20-15, 05:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Elysium32 View Post
(by the way..I ride a hybrid with a normal handlebar..trek DS 8.1).
That bike would probably hurt my tailbone. I couldn't ride on the road in an upright position like that for long periods. A mountain bike on the trails is different because you're always moving around, getting out of the saddle, ect. But on the road I couldn't ride a bike like that. I personally would suggest you look at a drop bar road bike for the kind of riding you're doing but I doubt you want to hear that haha
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Old 05-20-15, 05:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Looigi View Post
Interesting. I injured my tailbone many years ago and it can act up and be very painful sitting in office chairs and the like, but cycling hasn't bothered it at all, even after it's hurting from sitting at work.
I am new to the office chair situation.....I have been working as a marketer since last September. I used to teach before and it was different. I hardly ever stayed in the chair for more than 20 mins. I stood up, walked around and so on.
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Old 05-20-15, 05:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Looigi View Post
Interesting. I injured my tailbone many years ago and it can act up and be very painful sitting in office chairs and the like, but cycling hasn't bothered it at all, even after it's hurting from sitting at work.
You're upright in a chair with all the pressure on your tailbone. It' the same for me, I cracked mine in a parachute jump about 15 years ago. Plane rides and long car trips are the worst, I get a sharp pain after about two hours but i'm fine on a road bike.
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Old 05-20-15, 06:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Lazyass View Post
That bike would probably hurt my tailbone. I couldn't ride on the road in an upright position like that for long periods. A mountain bike on the trails is different because you're always moving around, getting out of the saddle, ect. But on the road I couldn't ride a bike like that. I personally would suggest you look at a drop bar road bike for the kind of riding you're doing but I doubt you want to hear that haha
The saddle is padded. It is really decent. You might be right though that bumps on the way to work are responsible for the pain. I stop using the bike for a few days and see if the pain disappears.
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Old 05-20-15, 06:04 AM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by Elysium32 View Post
The saddle is padded. It is really decent. You might be right though that bumps on the way to work are responsible for the pain. I stop using the bike for a few days and see if the pain disappears.
Significant, cushy saddle padding that you sink down into is not what you want for long riding. It is counter-intuitive but true. As Lazyass says, you are going about this wrong. You need to be less upright. If you were on a firmer saddle and bent more forward as on a drop bar road bike, you would have a better chance of avoiding the pain.
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Old 05-20-15, 06:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Elysium32 View Post
The saddle is padded. It is really decent. You might be right though that bumps on the way to work are responsible for the pain. I stop using the bike for a few days and see if the pain disappears.
Even with a padded saddle you have all the pressure on your tailbone sitting upright. Maybe some rest will help you. But really, for long rides a padded saddle will suck.

Saddles: Is Softer Better?

The first impulse of an unsophisticated rider who finds a saddle uncomfortable is to replace it with a softer one. This, however, is often a mistake. In the same way that the most comfortable mattress to sleep on is not necessarily the softest, soft saddles put the weight in all the wrong places, among other things.

Try sitting down on a desk, and leaning back a little. You'll notice that most of your weight is concentrated on two load-bearing "sit bones," or the ischial tuberosities. These are the structural elements of your body designed to carry your body weight when seated without pain or discomfort. Most cases of saddle discomfort arise when the weight is put on the soft tissues between and surrounding the sit bones.

Now imagine placing a soft pillow between the desk and your bottom. As you sit down on it, the fluff yields until the sit bones are nearly on the desk's surface once again. Now, however, you have pressure on tissues other than the sit bones from the pillow. Many saddle buyers are unaware of this, and department store saddles are designed to prey on such consumers. The fact that large springs are prominently mounted on the back, or that your thumb will sink right into the squishy top, makes Aunt Metilda say "Wow Geo-orge, look how com-fy this one looks! The seat on that Wal-Mart cruiser was always so hard on my poor tush!" meaning, of course, hard on tissues other than the sit bones.

In actuality, soft saddles are only comfortable for very short rides, and when you are on the bike for more than a mile or two they are much less comfortable than a real saddle. Women especially will find pressure on genitals to be uncomfortable, where they could have simply used a saddle with a cutout. Saddles with excessive padding and high-friction covers are also a common cause of painful chafing of the inner thigh, as rides become longer.

A springy saddle, or a soft one which doesn't keep your body the same distance from the pedals over bumps or through the pedal cycle, will disrupt your pedalling by causing the rider to bounce at high cadences. A springy or squishy saddle will also disrupt the proper seat height, which is a major factor in pedalling power.

Rather than getting a squishy "mattress" saddle, try getting a proper "racing" saddle. It's not just racers who will find them to be more comfortable and more efficient. Dial in your seat with respect to the tilt and position. Lower your handlebars and buy a bike with dropped handlebars for a less "upright" position (itself another gimmick for feeble Wal-Mart consumers), so less weight will be on your seat, and so that the energy of bumps is dissipated rather than being directed into telescoping your spinal cord.

http://www.bicyclesource.com/choosing_a_saddle
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Old 05-20-15, 06:56 AM
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Personal anecdote: When I had pain in that area I first determined if it was the actual tail BONE, or something else. After studying the anatomy closely, I found there to be two small triangular muscles that stabilize the tail. And just poking my own tail I could tell the bone was not what was hurting.

Then I read up on saddles and looked at the one on my bike. It turned out to be too narrow and too curved underneath and was pushing my sit bones apart straining those small muscles.
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Old 05-20-15, 07:06 AM
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Last fall I went through a 2 month stretch of serious tailbone pain myself. I sit in an office chair most of the day and it was terrible in the office but generally manageable on the bike. I found that a coccyx seat cushion (which is designed to take pressure off your tailbone area with a cut-out) for both my office chair and in my car have pretty much solved the issue for me.

If you spend a good amount of time sitting off of your bike (office,car,couch), I would look into getting one of these cushions. It has helped me tremendously.
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Old 05-20-15, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by atbat16 View Post
Last fall I went through a 2 month stretch of serious tailbone pain myself. I sit in an office chair most of the day and it was terrible in the office but generally manageable on the bike. I found that a coccyx seat cushion (which is designed to take pressure off your tailbone area with a cut-out) for both my office chair and in my car have pretty much solved the issue for me.

If you spend a good amount of time sitting off of your bike (office,car,couch), I would look into getting one of these cushions. It has helped me tremendously.
Yeah. I do spend a lot of time in an office chair. I might just stop cycling and wait till the pain disappears and look into those cushions and some new saddles. Cheers.
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Old 05-20-15, 09:08 AM
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Less padding, move the saddle forward or sit back more, bend elbows more or otherwise get lower, try to keep the lower back straight not curved.
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Old 05-20-15, 09:47 AM
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I feel for you. Had tailbone pain that bothered me for at least a year. Came on suddenly one day at work. Not sure to this day what caused it as I never had any sort of injury in that area. Tried all sorts of things to try and cure it but for me, it just had to run its course. One day it just went away.

I ended up getting a new office chair (company bought) that had a cutout in the rear to take pressure off that area which did provide relief. The donught cushions can help.

Cycling never caused a problem for me, I do believe it is due to bending forward taking pressure off the tailbone. I always had to lean way forward whenever I got up (very slowly) to minimize the pain.

I do make sure now, just to be sure, that my saddles always have a cutout at the back of the saddle as well as relief cutout in the center of the saddle as well.

I had X-rays done to make sure it was not broken or out of alignment, seeked out a Chiro that does adjustments of the tailbone to make sure it was set properly. I was about to the point off having it removed to alleviate the pain but that had risks as well. Thankfully it just went away and have not had any problems since, about 15 years now pain free.
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Old 05-20-15, 10:31 AM
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Broke mine in a crash last fall, cutout saddles and a laid back position make it a non-issue. saddles that don't support my sit bones 100% do make life and riding unbearable
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Old 06-02-15, 04:08 AM
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Originally Posted by CafeVelo View Post
Broke mine in a crash last fall, cutout saddles and a laid back position make it a non-issue. saddles that don't support my sit bones 100% do make life and riding unbearable
Thanks for the reply. Can you actually recommend a good and relatively cheap cutout saddle that I could buy off ebay or amazon?

What does "laid back position" mean?
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