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Reason for running red lights

Old 06-27-15, 07:53 PM
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I ride with a couple different groups. Some run reds. Some don't. I ONLY run red lights if it's absolutely safe.
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Old 06-27-15, 07:57 PM
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All red lights were not created equal. In congested areas, no way. Not worth the risk of injury and getting ticketed. In remote areas, no traffic in sight, I'm not waiting more than a few seconds. I try to avoid routes with a lot of traffic lights since it interrupts the ride too much.
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Old 06-27-15, 07:59 PM
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Originally Posted by howeeee
I ride about 20 miles at a time , 5 times a week. I run at least 5 red lights a ride. Cause I want to. I dont care what any one thinks about it
I am 62 been riding my entire life and dont wear a helmet.
Most fatalities of bike riders happens when, they are hit from behind and are riding perfectly legal, not from running red lights.
I like honest . Most people here give some B.S. reason why they shouldn't have to stop . At least your honest I respect that . Still think it's wrong but at least you aren't trying to justify it.
I don't wear a helmet either.
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Old 06-27-15, 08:09 PM
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It really isn't dangerous if you slow down first and check if you are cleared. Lights are for motor vehicles. However, I do stop at lights, because the cops will give me trouble if I don't. The law needs to be fixed.
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Old 06-27-15, 08:11 PM
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I ran a stop sign the other day (not anything unusual for me) and there was a police car. We saw each other... nether one of us was alarmed. I rode on... nothing happened.

I don't strictly obey all the traffic laws when I bicycle. I don't believe them all to be necessary. I ride... as I believe... to be safe.
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Old 06-27-15, 09:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Willbird
I was guessing something was being lost in the translation or dialect because in 50 years I have never heard sidewalks referred to as "pavements". I have not ridden on them since I was a small child.
Only in American and Canadian English are pavements or footpaths called "sidewalks."
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Old 06-27-15, 09:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Dave Cutter
I ran a stop sign the other day (not anything unusual for me) and there was a police car. We saw each other... nether one of us was alarmed. I rode on... nothing happened.

I don't strictly obey all the traffic laws when I bicycle. I don't believe them all to be necessary. I ride... as I believe... to be safe.
The cops in the police car used common sense. That's very good!
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Old 06-28-15, 05:17 AM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by rousseau
Only in American and Canadian English are pavements or footpaths called "sidewalks."
And pavement here is the street.
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Old 06-28-15, 08:58 AM
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Originally Posted by icyclist
If I'm in NYC, which is a few times a year, I never stop for red lights, and certainly no other cyclists stop, either. I'll only stop if I'm in danger of being struck by a vehicle. For that matter the only pedestrians who don't cross on red lights in NYC are tourists who risk being trampled by the locals.

That bit about pedestrians running the risk of being trampled is so true, and gets to a reason some cyclist may so regularly 'blow through' red lights (many local cyclists actually DO stop and are quite obedient); it's not to take some added risk, it's about NOT presenting oneself to hazards. Crossing an intersection against a light often seems safer than riding up the street. At least you can see what's coming at you from the side, unlike side streets where you never know who or what's going to pop out from between parked cars, whether a door will open, etc.. Admittedly, waiting at the corner is usually the most prudent thing to do. However, when traffic is moving, at least you can see where it's going, while the greatest uncertainties come when the lights change. Some will want to turn and some will want to go straight (and don't imagine that those who want to turn won't do so across traffic that wants to go straight), pedestrians will change their mind about which crossing they want to take first; who will try to go around whom, and how? Sometimes it seems the safest thing to do is to take oneself out of the equation before it becomes a problem.

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Old 06-28-15, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Dave Cutter
I ride... as I believe... to be safe.
Best way to go about it. Trust your judgment instead of mindlessly following a light. Always be aware of your surroundings and decide what is best for the given situation.
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Old 06-28-15, 10:35 AM
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City /County sponsorship and like the Pros they can close the roads for you.
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Old 06-28-15, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by rousseau
Only in American and Canadian English are pavements or footpaths called "sidewalks."
i.e. the majority of English speaking people know them as sidewalks.
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Old 06-28-15, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by gregf83
i.e. the majority of English speaking people know them as sidewalks.
Off-topic, but what a bizarre thing to say. Canada and the U.S. total about 355 million native English speakers (with most of Quebec the obvious exception).

The UK, Australia, New Zealand, Nigeria and South Africa total about 200 million native English speakers, and then you have other speakers of English as a second language using the terms "pavement" and/or "footpath" numbering about 250 million in South Asia, 250 million in Europe and probably about 200 million more in the rest of East Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Latin America is famously not very English-speaking, either first or second language-wise, so while it probably takes more English-language-related cultural cues from the U.S., the numbers are comparatively minimal.

The vast, vast majority of English speakers know that section at the side of the street reserved for pedestrians as "the pavement."
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Old 06-28-15, 01:45 PM
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Originally Posted by rousseau
Off-topic, but what a bizarre thing to say. Canada and the U.S. total about 355 million native English speakers (with most of Quebec the obvious exception).

The UK, Australia, New Zealand, Nigeria and South Africa total about 200 million native English speakers, and then you have other speakers of English as a second language using the terms "pavement" and/or "footpath" numbering about 250 million in South Asia, 250 million in Europe and probably about 200 million more in the rest of East Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Latin America is famously not very English-speaking, either first or second language-wise, so while it probably takes more English-language-related cultural cues from the U.S., the numbers are comparatively minimal.

The vast, vast majority of English speakers know that section at the side of the street reserved for pedestrians as "the pavement."
Continuing in the off-topic vein, I googled sidewalks in India and Nigeria:

From the Daily Post in Nigeria: "Lagos State Government to seize cars parked on the sidewalk"
From the Times of India: "Sidewalks sacrificed for road space"

Seems English people round the world know what sidewalks are
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Old 06-28-15, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by gregf83
Continuing in the off-topic vein, I googled sidewalks in India and Nigeria:

From the Daily Post in Nigeria: "Lagos State Government to seize cars parked on the sidewalk"
From the Times of India: "Sidewalks sacrificed for road space"

Seems English people round the world know what sidewalks are
Certainly they might know what they are. But that's not the conventional terminology.

More googling:

site:timesofindia.indiatimes.com "sidewalks" -- 1,710 results
site:timesofindia.indiatimes.com "pavements" -- 6,080 results
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Old 06-28-15, 02:00 PM
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Idaho stops should become a national law.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idaho_stop
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Old 06-28-15, 02:02 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK
Someone suggested elsewhere that I think they were putting in lights in Washington to indicate when the sensor has been triggered. Laying the bike on the sensor or whatever is great, but it still doesn't guarantee that one has hit the trigger... and one doesn't know until one waits for a full light cycle.
Portland, OR has at least one. Best thing ever! Just a small blue indicator lamp under the signal which illuminates when the sensor is triggered.
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Old 06-28-15, 02:23 PM
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Isn't three pages for the A & S crowd enough? I don't sneak into their forum to ask which tires are better or whether I should go traditional or compact.
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Old 06-28-15, 02:38 PM
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Originally Posted by rousseau
Certainly they might know what they are. But that's not the conventional terminology.

More googling:

site:timesofindia.indiatimes.com "sidewalks" -- 1,710 results
site:timesofindia.indiatimes.com "pavements" -- 6,080 results
I must be bored. The first article from India I found mentioned 'pavements' 18 times all of them referring to the road surface not a sidewalk. Nice try though
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Old 06-28-15, 02:58 PM
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Originally Posted by rousseau
Only in American and Canadian English are pavements or footpaths called "sidewalks."
that makes perfect sense them, because Only in America defines me perfectly :-)
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Old 06-28-15, 03:35 PM
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Originally Posted by gregf83
I must be bored. The first article from India I found mentioned 'pavements' 18 times all of them referring to the road surface not a sidewalk. Nice try though
And I must be bored, because I'm responding to...what? You think I'm "trying" to prove that most English-speaking people in the world use the term "pavement" instead of "sidewalk"?

First page of results from Times of India using "site:timesofindia.indiatimes.com "pavements"" search in Google:

- Delhi HC says pavements are for pedestrians, not hawkers ...
- At PGI, relatives of patients forced to camp on pavements
- Fight to reclaim pavements goes online
- Pavements wider but little space to walk
- Pavements taken, hawkers eye roads
- Trees on pavements have fate cemented
- 750 Teynampet shops rapped for encroaching pavements
- Pavement - Times of India › Topics: For those who have given up their fight to reclaim pavements...
- Pavements may soon get pre-cast concrete slabs

I'm not saying that the term "sidewalk" isn't understood or maybe even sometimes used. Though I certainly am insinuating that it's typically ignorant and provincial of North Americans to have no idea that most of the world uses certain different terms from them.

Now, go pound the pavement and find yourself a real job. And by that I don't mean sit in the middle of the street and punch the asphalt.
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Old 06-28-15, 05:00 PM
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We're off topic, let's get back on topic please?

Start a pavement thread if you must do pavements.
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Old 06-28-15, 05:18 PM
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A sidewalk is a path for pedestrians that runs along the side of a road. It can also be called a pavement, a footpath , a footway, or probably many other variations.

Sidewalk best defines what it actually is and where it occurs. A pavement could be a street, a parking lot, a bridge, or anything paved. Not well defined. The name sidewalk makes more sense and is being used in the US for good reason. Call it what you want, but bickering over the name is silly.

Now I have to go use the john, or is it the toilet, or the crapper, or the latrine, or the head, or the can, or the loo, or the facility, or the lavatory, or the porcelain god, or the pot, or the thunder box, or the ...........................
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Old 06-28-15, 05:31 PM
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Originally Posted by FLvector
A sidewalk is a path for pedestrians that runs along the side of a road. It can also be called a pavement, a footpath , a footway, or probably many other variations.

Sidewalk best defines what it actually is and where it occurs. A pavement could be a street, a parking lot, a bridge, or anything paved. Not well defined. The name sidewalk makes more sense and is being used in the US for good reason. Call it what you want, but bickering over the name is silly.

Now I have to go use the john, or is it the toilet, or the crapper, or the latrine, or the head, or the can, or the loo, or the facility, or the lavatory, or the porcelain god, or the pot, or the thunder box, or the ...........................
Nobody in the USA uses a WC though :-).
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Old 06-28-15, 06:58 PM
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Originally Posted by rousseau
Certainly they might know what they are. But that's not the conventional terminology.

More googling:

site:timesofindia.indiatimes.com "sidewalks" -- 1,710 results
site:timesofindia.indiatimes.com "pavements" -- 6,080 results
So since a boot is something we wear in America and since we are in America then everyone in America knows that boot is something that we wear...except in the UK and other former English colonies boot is what is known in America as a trunk of a car, so anyone calling a car trunk a trunk is wrong.

This is the dumbest argument I've ever seen here, except for the ones I get into.
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