Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Tire pressure advice please

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Tire pressure advice please

Old 07-02-15, 02:22 PM
  #1  
bakes1
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: North Jersey
Posts: 1,248

Bikes: 1975 Motobecane Le Champion lilac, 2015 Specialized Secteur Elite

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Tire pressure advice please

I am 6' 2", 225lbs and my bike is a Specialized Secteur Elite (not sure what it weighs)
I currently have 700x25/28c Roubaix Pro tires on it. Everything else on the bike is stock except the carbon seat post.
Any advice as to best tire pressure would be greatly appreciated. Also, same pressure front and back or considerably less in front?
I have been riding it approx 15-20 miles per day for about 2 months now on average North Jersey roads.
I am pretty sure the LBS inflated them to around 110psi when I first purchased the bike but I am not positive.
They now obviously need to be re-inflated and I just purchased a floor pump with gauge but would like some advice before messing around.
I don't mind the occasional rough road conditions so think I would like to have them at max psi.
Sorry if this has been beat to death somewhere else here but after a quick search I could not find anything specific.
Thanks in advance!

Last edited by bakes1; 07-02-15 at 02:23 PM. Reason: typo
bakes1 is offline  
Old 07-02-15, 02:31 PM
  #2  
pdedes
ka maté ka maté ka ora
 
pdedes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: wessex
Posts: 4,423

Bikes: breezer venturi - red novo bosberg - red, pedal force cg1 - red, neuvation f-100 - da, devinci phantom - xt, miele piste - miche/campy, bianchi reparto corse sbx, concorde squadra tsx - da, miele team issue sl - ultegra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
less than you think. something around 90 psi. i air up every ride.
pdedes is offline  
Old 07-02-15, 02:45 PM
  #3  
ColaJacket
Senior Member
 
ColaJacket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 1,897

Bikes: Fuji Sportif 1.3 C - 2014

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Tire pressure calculator

GH
ColaJacket is offline  
Old 07-02-15, 02:45 PM
  #4  
rpenmanparker 
Senior Member
 
rpenmanparker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 28,405

Bikes: 1990 Romic Reynolds 531 custom build, Merlin Works CR Ti custom build, super light Workswell 066 custom build

Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6346 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Air up before ever ride. Don't start them out over preesure and let them deflate over time until they are too low. Normally front is about 15% higher than rear, but smaller tires are inflated higher than larger. The difference between 25 and 28 is usually about the difference between fromt and rear, so in your case I would inflate them the same. Considering your weight I would say about 105-110 in both. But you already knew that. Again inflate before every ride.
__________________
Robert

Originally Posted by LAJ View Post
No matter where I go, here I am...
rpenmanparker is offline  
Old 07-02-15, 02:51 PM
  #5  
Wilfred Laurier
Señor Member
 
Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 4,283
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 327 Post(s)
Liked 64 Times in 45 Posts
I am a little heavier than you and with 700 X 28c tires I would go for ~100 psi in the rear, 90-95 in the front. 700x25c tires I would put at 105-110 rear, 95-100 front.

So if you have 25mm front/28mm rear (not sure what you meant by '700x25/28c'), 95-100 both front and rear would be my recommendation.

Making your tires too hard will require extra energy at the pedals because you bounce around on small bumps that should be absorbed by the tires. If you ever feel the rim bottoming out then you know your pressure is too low.
Wilfred Laurier is online now  
Old 07-02-15, 02:56 PM
  #6  
cwar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 198

Bikes: BH RC1, Bianchi Volpe, Orbea Avant

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm considerably lighter than you and I run about 110 in the back and 100 in the front on 23's. Definitely top them off at least every 2-3 days, if not before every ride. If they lose too much pressure you increase the risk of a pinch flat.
cwar is offline  
Old 07-02-15, 03:13 PM
  #7  
bakes1
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: North Jersey
Posts: 1,248

Bikes: 1975 Motobecane Le Champion lilac, 2015 Specialized Secteur Elite

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
I am a little heavier than you and with 700 X 28c tires I would go for ~100 psi in the rear, 90-95 in the front. 700x25c tires I would put at 105-110 rear, 95-100 front.

So if you have 25mm front/28mm rear (not sure what you meant by '700x25/28c'), 95-100 both front and rear would be my recommendation.

Making your tires too hard will require extra energy at the pedals because you bounce around on small bumps that should be absorbed by the tires. If you ever feel the rim bottoming out then you know your pressure is too low.
Sorry, I am new to the sport and not familiar at all with the technical side of things.
Both my front and rear tire say that same measurement - 700x25/28c
Not sure exactly what that means?
What would be the more common or correct term for that tire size?
Am I missing something else on the measurement?
bakes1 is offline  
Old 07-02-15, 03:22 PM
  #8  
rpenmanparker 
Senior Member
 
rpenmanparker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 28,405

Bikes: 1990 Romic Reynolds 531 custom build, Merlin Works CR Ti custom build, super light Workswell 066 custom build

Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6346 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
The first number is sort of the rim diameter. Pehaps the second number 25 is for normal width rims and the third number 28 is for wide rims. Crazy, but it's possible. There used to be a third measurement, the height of the tire profile. That could be the third number. Dunno. If the two tires are the same, inflate the rear by about 15% mor than the rear. For 25s 100/115 sounds right at your weight.
__________________
Robert

Originally Posted by LAJ View Post
No matter where I go, here I am...
rpenmanparker is offline  
Old 07-02-15, 03:29 PM
  #9  
Kopsis
Senior Member
 
Kopsis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: St. Pete, Florida
Posts: 1,258
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The only "rule" that the majority will agree on is don't exceed the max pressure number embossed on the sidewall. Beyond that, everyone has their own idea of "optimal" tire pressure. It depends as much on how and where you ride as it does on tire size. If you're riding chip & seal or roads in a state of disrepair, you might want to run lower pressure and accept increased rolling resistance for a smoother ride. If you're riding smooth fast roads, you may want to run higher pressure to reduce rolling resistance.

Since your tires are already low, you might try upping the pressure step by step and doing short test rides to see what feels best. Start around 85 PSI then go for a short test ride and pay attention to ride quality, traction, and rolling resistance. Now add 5 PSI and do the same test ride. Did rolling resistance get noticeably better? Did ride get noticeably worse? Add another 5 PSI and test again. At some point, rolling resistance will stop improving but the ride quality will continue to get worse. That's your "max". Now back off 5 PSI (to the previous pressure) and do some longer rides. Adjust up or down as needed but you probably won't need to go more than +/- 5 PSI from that point.
Kopsis is offline  
Old 07-02-15, 06:00 PM
  #10  
Catinella
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Washington State
Posts: 95

Bikes: Trek 7.4 FX (2015), Trek 1500 SLR (2005)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Has anybody tried the Vittoria tire app from iTire Pressure App - Vittoria.com For my weight (me+bike, 165 pounds) and tires (700x23 60TPI), it gives me psi of 95 and 100 front and back. (You input the weight in Kg.)

Last edited by Catinella; 07-02-15 at 06:10 PM.
Catinella is offline  
Old 07-02-15, 06:10 PM
  #11  
rms13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: SoCal
Posts: 6,517
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 273 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm a firm believer in looking at what is printed on the side of my tires as the manufacturer recommendations. My current tires recommend 6-8 bars (90-115 psi). I usually run about 115 in the back and 100 in the front and as others said fill up before every ride . you'd be surprised how much air you loose overnight. But not all tires are the same. I had some 700x28 that recommended max inflation of 80 psi so if I was going by random generalized advice I may have run those at 110 and who knows what may have happened! (Seriously, what would have happened ?)

If you under inflating you also run the risk of pinch flats , assuming you have tubes
rms13 is offline  
Old 07-02-15, 07:02 PM
  #12  
goenrdoug
Senior Member
 
goenrdoug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,327

Bikes: 2019 Supersix Evo, 2002 Trek 2000

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 224 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
what I've heard/lived by is that you look at the max PSI on the side of the tire and, if you're on the upper end of the weight spectrum, you fill to the max psi suggested for the rear and about 80-85% of that for the front. For me (5'11/205 lbs), that means 120 in back and 100 in the front on my GP4000s
goenrdoug is offline  
Old 07-03-15, 03:45 PM
  #13  
bakes1
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: North Jersey
Posts: 1,248

Bikes: 1975 Motobecane Le Champion lilac, 2015 Specialized Secteur Elite

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks all!
bakes1 is offline  
Old 07-03-15, 04:59 PM
  #14  
spectastic
commu*ist spy
 
spectastic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: inside my body
Posts: 4,406

Bikes: a few

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 623 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
I am a little heavier than you and with 700 X 28c tires I would go for ~100 psi in the rear, 90-95 in the front. 700x25c tires I would put at 105-110 rear, 95-100 front.

So if you have 25mm front/28mm rear (not sure what you meant by '700x25/28c'), 95-100 both front and rear would be my recommendation.

Making your tires too hard will require extra energy at the pedals because you bounce around on small bumps that should be absorbed by the tires. If you ever feel the rim bottoming out then you know your pressure is too low.
at 225 lbs, Id say this is pretty close to what you want.

the tire bouncing thing is really more of a function of what the road looks like. if it's chip seal, yes a high psi will suck. if it's flat asphalt, rolling resistance is a bigger issue, so a higher pressure is good.
spectastic is offline  
Old 07-03-15, 05:53 PM
  #15  
bakes1
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: North Jersey
Posts: 1,248

Bikes: 1975 Motobecane Le Champion lilac, 2015 Specialized Secteur Elite

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Ended up going with what was printed on tire and did around 90 in rear and 85 in front. Not sure how exact I was as it was the first time I ever used a floor pump with gauge and first time ever inflating with a Presta valve. Was ofc fairly simple though after a quick look at a how to video on youtube
As I stated earlier in the thread, I am quite new to the technical side of biking. As a kid I just filled the old Schwinn Varsity tires until they felt good and then rode. Flats were fixed at the LBS or by a friend.
My tires must have been pretty low though as I was considerably faster on my regular route this morning. Approx .5 mph
Could have been other factors though ofc but pretty sure it was the tires.
bakes1 is offline  
Old 07-12-15, 11:04 AM
  #16  
radiored
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: North Haven, CT
Posts: 12

Bikes: 2015 Trek Madone 2.1

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
For my Trek Madone 2.1 with 700 X 23 tires, and me at 217 lbs, the Berto Tire Pressure app gives me 312 psi rear and 205 psi front, for 130.0 rear load/87.0 front.
If I can find Kevlar tubes and ear protectors, I should be good, no?

OTOH, I think I'll continue to 'speriment around 100-120 psi . . .
I'm glad I tried the free version of the app first.
radiored is offline  
Old 09-11-15, 11:54 AM
  #17  
Fastfwd01
Senior Member
 
Fastfwd01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Oklahoma City
Posts: 333

Bikes: 2015 Cervelo R5 Dura Ace, 2015 Cannondale Synapse 5 Disc 105, 2006 Cannondale F300

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Kopsis View Post
The only "rule" that the majority will agree on is don't exceed the max pressure number embossed on the sidewall. Beyond that, everyone has their own idea of "optimal" tire pressure. It depends as much on how and where you ride as it does on tire size. If you're riding chip & seal or roads in a state of disrepair, you might want to run lower pressure and accept increased rolling resistance for a smoother ride. If you're riding smooth fast roads, you may want to run higher pressure to reduce rolling resistance.

Since your tires are already low, you might try upping the pressure step by step and doing short test rides to see what feels best. Start around 85 PSI then go for a short test ride and pay attention to ride quality, traction, and rolling resistance. Now add 5 PSI and do the same test ride. Did rolling resistance get noticeably better? Did ride get noticeably worse? Add another 5 PSI and test again. At some point, rolling resistance will stop improving but the ride quality will continue to get worse. That's your "max". Now back off 5 PSI (to the previous pressure) and do some longer rides. Adjust up or down as needed but you probably won't need to go more than +/- 5 PSI from that point.
I might have to try this. I think I started out riding with less pressure in my tires and over time came to believe that I needed at least over 100 psi front and rear to go faster. I just got a new carbon bike and have been amazed with how smooth it rides and decided to just do around 90 psi on the aluminum bike last night and it made a HUGE difference in ride quality. I don't think it really impacted my rolling resistance much if any.
Fastfwd01 is offline  
Old 09-11-15, 12:15 PM
  #18  
Wilfred Laurier
Señor Member
 
Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 4,283
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 327 Post(s)
Liked 64 Times in 45 Posts
Originally Posted by Fastfwd01 View Post
I might have to try this. I think I started out riding with less pressure in my tires and over time came to believe that I needed at least over 100 psi front and rear to go faster. I just got a new carbon bike and have been amazed with how smooth it rides and decided to just do around 90 psi on the aluminum bike last night and it made a HUGE difference in ride quality. I don't think it really impacted my rolling resistance much if any.

'Rolling resistance', or the energy lost to flexing the tire carcass while riding, is generally overblown as a source of resistance to actual riding. It is usually dwarfed by aerodynamic resistance of bike and rider, and even of the frontal area of the tires themselves.
Wilfred Laurier is online now  
Old 09-11-15, 12:22 PM
  #19  
series1811
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 246

Bikes: 2015 Cannondale SuperSix EVO 105, 2012 Fuji Roubaix, 1988 Basso Gap

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
For me - 100 front, 110 rear, air up before each ride. Pressure is a very subjective thing with rider weight and road feel being the main factors most consider. Tire pressure will also influence how well a bike corners. Experiment with it to decide what works best for you.
series1811 is offline  
Old 09-11-15, 03:28 PM
  #20  
tFUnK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 2,417

Bikes: GT Forte Ti, GT GTR Carbon Sport, BMC RaceMachine, Guru Photon, Bianchi San Jose, Trek Portland, Xootr Swift

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Bicycle tire pressure calculator
tFUnK is offline  
Old 09-11-15, 04:59 PM
  #21  
patrickgm60
Senior Member
 
patrickgm60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Northern CA
Posts: 528

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
Normally front is about 15% higher than rear...
I think that's opposite.

For years, I've run my 25s at 95F/105R. Recently, I've been reducing both, and have noticed a plusher ride, without having any noticeable loss in speed/endurance. Now running 85F/95R. Overheard a couple of guys recently chatting about this. One guy, weighing less than 150#, said he inflates to 120 front and rear. That must be a brutal ride...
patrickgm60 is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
chefisaac
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
12
06-17-12 06:47 PM
stevesid
Classic and Vintage Bicycles: Whats it Worth? Appraisals.
35
05-21-12 03:11 PM
I_Suck_At_BMX
BMX
1
12-09-09 09:27 AM
superduper54
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
8
07-03-09 01:48 PM
Terror_in_pink
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
28
04-04-07 10:46 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.