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Planning on getting a Road Bike. Is 235 LBS too much for it?

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Planning on getting a Road Bike. Is 235 LBS too much for it?

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Old 07-14-15, 04:40 AM
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DreamRider85
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Planning on getting a Road Bike. Is 235 LBS too much for it?

Hello. I really am looking into getting a road bike that I can use daily for long rides. I have already used mountain bikes on the road, but am really interested in more speed and distance because I know it will be more enjoyable for me and I'll use it a lot longer each day. One time I was checking out used road bikes at some random shed and the guy asked me how much I weighed. I told him 235 lbs and he said that he didn't think anyone over 200 could ride a road bikes. I'm a more built, muscular guy, but still have weight to lose and that's also why I seriously want to ride a road bike.

But I am very serious about riding a road bike if possible. I want to be able to do long distance. However, I know that getting the right bike can be very complicated. I don't want to end up getting the wrong one or one that doesn't fit.

Also, how do you know where to look for the right one? Research online? Visit the stores? Any specific manufactures? How do you know which place offers the best deals? I just don't want to get ripped off even though I understand this is an investment.

And how do beginner road bikes differ from more advanced road bikes? How much money is it typical to spend on a good quality bike? I want to get a bike that will last me, not one that is just going to break and then force me to buy another one. I just want to buy one bike and use it.

Lastly, how do I get one that won't cause back pain?
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Old 07-14-15, 04:49 AM
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There's a whole other forum about this Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)

My guess is you won't have any problems getting on a bike you'll like a lot. Best of luck!
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Old 07-14-15, 04:58 AM
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Don't EVER buy a bike from that guy at that "random shed" because he has NO idea what he's talking about.I'm a fit 265lb ex football player that's been riding/racing road bikes for forever without any problem. During my most recent bike purchase I asked the shop owner what Cannondale suggests for weight limits for their bikes and was told it's somewhere north of 300lbs but each bike was different. A good new starter bike runs around 1K but deals can be had on new old stock when the newer models start to hit the stores.
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Old 07-14-15, 04:59 AM
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Originally Posted by sced View Post
There's a whole other forum about this Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)

My guess is you won't have any problems getting on a bike you'll like a lot. Best of luck!
Yes, the Clydes & Athenas sub-forum specializes in the needs of big folks.
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Old 07-14-15, 05:15 AM
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Have you never seen anyone who looks to be around 235 lbs. (or more) on a road bike? I probably saw close to a dozen this past weekend alone.
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Old 07-14-15, 05:42 AM
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I started out well above that number when I got my road bike and have had no problems to speak of. Most new road bikes will handle your weight no problem, just be sure to keep it properly maintained and check your tire pressure before each ride and you'll be fine. I would probably also stay away from any used carbon bikes just to be safe.

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Old 07-14-15, 05:49 AM
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235 is OK to ride a bike. Just don't go buying 16 spokes wheels and keep your tires at full pressure before each ride. You might want to go with 25mm tires instead of 23 it could save you a couple pinch flats, but 23s are good anyway. Other than that you're good to go, have fun!
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Old 07-14-15, 05:59 AM
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strong wheels and wide tires is what you need

the rest should cope normal
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Old 07-14-15, 07:18 AM
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I'm about 239 with a carbon road bike & 25mm tires. No problems.
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Old 07-14-15, 07:21 AM
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"And how do beginner road bikes differ from more advanced road bikes? How much money is it typical to spend on a good quality bike? I want to get a bike that will last me, not one that is just going to break and then force me to buy another one. I just want to buy one bike and use it. "

The differences in beginner vs more advanced...

Beginner bikes are usually heavier (25 pound range) where more advanced bikes are usually under 20 pounds.

Beginner bikes have lower quality shifters, cranks, pedals and derailleurs than more advanced bikes. As a 235 pounder, the brakes on most beginner bikes will be sketchy on a fast descent down a steep hill. Many can perform well with better pads, but if the bike is under $800, odds are, the brakes will not be adequate.

Beginner bikes usually have a brick for a seat. There are exceptions, but a good seat can cost you $100.

I'd say to get a durable bike that you will be happy with, you will be in the $800 range.

As far as back pain, that is a matter of core strength and fitness. Some road bikes are relaxed fit (sit you up higher) but as your fitness increases, you will find it tough to adjust these to an agressive riding position.

As far as your weight, any reputable road bike will be fine.
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Old 07-14-15, 08:19 AM
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I weighed 235 when I bought my Cannondale Synapse. It has Shimano wheels with 16 spokes in front and 20 at the rear --- no problems. None. The wheels have remained straight and I've never had to touch a spoke wrench to them.

I run a 28mm tire in front and a 32 on the rear and 75 and 90 psi respectively. Both are Continental "Gatorskins" and the 32 barely fits between the chain stays.

You'll be fine.


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Joe
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Old 07-14-15, 08:27 AM
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My friend is 270 (not muscular) and rides a full carbon Supersix with 700x23 tires and nothing has exploded after a couple of years. If you are bigger you might want higher spoke count wheels but the good thing is heavier, high spoke wheels are cheap compared to light weight wheels
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Old 07-14-15, 01:13 PM
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Thanks for the advice guys. Now where should I research where to get one? Now you may not know exactly where I live, it's in the Bay Area actually. Is there any particular way of knowing which stores charge too much and which stores are better?

So I get that 25 tires would be good. And do you recommend I go for an entry level bike even if I have the extra money I'm willing to spend? How much better or worse would it be to spend a little more and get a non level entry bike? Which one would be more worth it in the long run?
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Old 07-14-15, 01:27 PM
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It's always worth it to get higher quality. It usually lasts longer, get the best you can afford comfortably. Bike shops usually have an extremely low margin on bikes, with prices set to a degree by manufacturers. Just about any bike at a bike shop will cost what it's worth, some brands do represent a better price point value, however. Accessories are the only place products vary in price, and that's often due to the speed they move through the store. In general, no shop will be price gouging on accessories. If you go to a few of them you'll get an idea of what stuff costs. I picked my shops of choice based on the staff more than the products, however. Having a good LBS behind you is invaluable.

Do spend money on wheels, this is one place where weight limits are surprisingly low. I'm at 190 and marginally overweight for a lot of wheels, and it's my experience that wheels I'm on the limits of don't last terribly long on the awful backroads in my area. Get a set of handbuilt high spoke count wheels and you'll probably never need more. Tell shops your concern and see how they suggest you go for wheels, many shops can build an excellent set for you, with spoke type and quantity as well as rim geometry suited to someone who is going to test their limitations.

Back pain is symptomatic of fit, pay for a professional fitting when you get the bike and you shouldn't have problems.
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Old 07-14-15, 01:36 PM
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You can spend anywhere from $800 clear on up to $20k, it's all up to you. Like most things, there's value to be had in the middle of the range. Don't forget to budget for all the extra crap you'll have to buy with your bike (helmet, shorts, gloves, flat repair kit, spare tubes, pumps etc). It's not trivial if you're just starting out.

If you want a less racy but still fast bike (the much discussed "endurance" geometry) Cannondale Synapse and Giant Defy are both available in Aluminum frames, and you can probably get a nicely outfitted one for well under $1500.
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Old 07-14-15, 02:04 PM
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235 lbs is way too heavy for a road bike! Most road bikes are between 15 and 25 lbs.
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Old 07-14-15, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by CafeVelo View Post
It's always worth it to get higher quality. It usually lasts longer, get the best you can afford comfortably. Bike shops usually have an extremely low margin on bikes, with prices set to a degree by manufacturers. Just about any bike at a bike shop will cost what it's worth, some brands do represent a better price point value, however. Accessories are the only place products vary in price, and that's often due to the speed they move through the store. In general, no shop will be price gouging on accessories. If you go to a few of them you'll get an idea of what stuff costs. I picked my shops of choice based on the staff more than the products, however. Having a good LBS behind you is invaluable.

Do spend money on wheels, this is one place where weight limits are surprisingly low. I'm at 190 and marginally overweight for a lot of wheels, and it's my experience that wheels I'm on the limits of don't last terribly long on the awful backroads in my area. Get a set of handbuilt high spoke count wheels and you'll probably never need more. Tell shops your concern and see how they suggest you go for wheels, many shops can build an excellent set for you, with spoke type and quantity as well as rim geometry suited to someone who is going to test their limitations.

Back pain is symptomatic of fit, pay for a professional fitting when you get the bike and you shouldn't have problems.

Higher quality is good but there is also such a thing as diminishing returns which usually kicks in around $1000-1500 depending on make and model.

Plenty of good advice. Syanapse and Defy are very popular endurance style bikes and if you have money to burn they are worth looking at. They do come entry level as low as $700 but both go up to $10k carbon versions too. Generally speaking a bike with new 11 speed 105 components is a good entry point that is not more bike than you need but also nice enough that you won't necessarily want a new bike in a year if you really get into it. Performance Bike shops are also a good place to look because you can get a 105 equipped bike for about $1000 there compared to closer to $1500 for Cannondale/Giant etc. But if money isn't a big concern, it's worth shopping around and test riding as many bikes as you can and "test riding" different LBS (bike shops) to see if there is one that you can build a good relationship with
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Old 07-14-15, 02:32 PM
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Originally Posted by DreamRider85 View Post
Hello. I really am looking into getting a road bike that I can use daily for long rides. I have already used mountain bikes on the road, but am really interested in more speed and distance because I know it will be more enjoyable for me and I'll use it a lot longer each day. One time I was checking out used road bikes at some random shed and the guy asked me how much I weighed. I told him 235 lbs and he said that he didn't think anyone over 200 could ride a road bikes. I'm a more built, muscular guy, but still have weight to lose and that's also why I seriously want to ride a road bike.

But I am very serious about riding a road bike if possible. I want to be able to do long distance. However, I know that getting the right bike can be very complicated. I don't want to end up getting the wrong one or one that doesn't fit.

Also, how do you know where to look for the right one? Research online? Visit the stores? Any specific manufactures? How do you know which place offers the best deals? I just don't want to get ripped off even though I understand this is an investment.

And how do beginner road bikes differ from more advanced road bikes? How much money is it typical to spend on a good quality bike? I want to get a bike that will last me, not one that is just going to break and then force me to buy another one. I just want to buy one bike and use it.

Lastly, how do I get one that won't cause back pain?
Most bike manufacturers have weight limits on their bikes which is typically about 275 pounds for the rider.
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Old 07-14-15, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by DreamRider85 View Post
Thanks for the advice guys. Now where should I research where to get one? Now you may not know exactly where I live, it's in the Bay Area actually. Is there any particular way of knowing which stores charge too much and which stores are better?

So I get that 25 tires would be good. And do you recommend I go for an entry level bike even if I have the extra money I'm willing to spend? How much better or worse would it be to spend a little more and get a non level entry bike? Which one would be more worth it in the long run?
Where in the Bay Are do you live? I've had good experience at Calmar Cycles in Santa Clara.

As for what level of bike, it really come down to how much you want to set aside for your budget. The components are really where a lot of the cost can start pushing the prices higher, but it really depends on how much you'll be riding. Overall, its always worth it to get the best trim you're comfortable (financially) purchasing.
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Old 07-14-15, 03:10 PM
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Originally Posted by RPK79 View Post
235 lbs is way too heavy for a road bike! Most road bikes are between 15 and 25 lbs.
Winner!
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Old 07-14-15, 03:24 PM
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I switched from the mountain bike on the road to a road bike when I got down to about 255 or so. I bought it on craigslist and had to do some work on it, but I've been riding 20f/24r cheap wheels on it for about 6000 miles and have only had two broken spokes. I'm down to about 205 now and still loving it.

I guess my two points are this:

1. You can spend a lot less if you shop used. New is great, but, like cars, depreciation happens quickly in the bike world. If you have a bike-knowledgeable friend (or want to post your height/inseam here) you can probably find a craigslist bike in fine shape that would have run you a lot more $$ new.
2. Spoke count isn't THAT big of a deal. If you ride carefully, you could probably run really low count wheels and probably not encounter issues. That being said, go for wheels with 24 in front and 28 in back and you'll be golden. Again, if you go rumbling off road, ignore pot holes, etc. even a set with 32 spokes isn't going to save you.

Don't over-think it too much. It's not like you're in the 400 pound territory where you'd need to start thinking custom stuff. Don't let that old coot in the shed freak you out.
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Old 07-14-15, 05:55 PM
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Originally Posted by RPK79 View Post
235 lbs is way too heavy for a road bike! Most road bikes are between 15 and 25 lbs.
See this is where I get confused. Some people say it's too much, but then others here say no problem. What about the 265 football player on here that says he has no problems?
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Old 07-14-15, 06:12 PM
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He's joking. Calling a 235lb bike way to heavy.. Not you.
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Old 07-14-15, 06:17 PM
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And btw, the Tour de France has seen a 213lb rider.
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Old 07-14-15, 06:17 PM
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I believe that was sarcasm, where 235 pounds is too much for a BICYCLE to weigh.
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