Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Stolen Focus bike :(

Old 10-18-15, 09:15 PM
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reburbia
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Stolen Focus bike :(

So my Focus Mares AX was stolen outside USPS today. I really loved that thing. Learned my lesson and got some renters/bicycle insurance

Haven't seen an affordable Focus yet, so I'm currently looking at two bikes.
1) $500. See attached picture of 58cm Specialized M2 Comp bike with shimano 105 / sti shifters

2) Between $6-800, depending on negotiation ability. See attached picture of Reynolds 853 steel frame, Black LeMond Cyclocross bike with Grand Prix road tires


If neither of these are a great deal, please let me know what other bike you think I might enjoy. I enjoyed the light aluminum frame of my old Focus bike, but I have heard many people say that a steel frame can absorb the shocks/bumps better than aluminum.
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Old 10-18-15, 09:26 PM
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I'd go for the Black Lemond CX.

Consider it a poor man's do anything bike.

Throw on some all-around tires and you can hit the trails as well as ride fast on the tarmac.

Good luck.
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Old 10-18-15, 09:35 PM
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Insurance is nice, but what about a legit lock (u-lock, chain lock, etc.)? I'm assuming it wasn't locked up when it was stolen (or if it was, it was a cable lock or something)?
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Old 10-18-15, 09:40 PM
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A lock will deter amateurs.

If a professional bike thief wants a bike its as good as gone.

If I'm going to ride someplace I know is a high crime area, I'm going to ride the ugliest, grimy beater bike I have.

And I won't stay away from my bike any longer than absolutely necessary.
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Old 10-18-15, 09:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Maconi View Post
Insurance is nice, but what about a legit lock (u-lock, chain lock, etc.)? I'm assuming it wasn't locked up when it was stolen (or if it was, it was a cable lock or something)?
Left the bike alone for an hour, and came back to see both my bike and the U-lock missing.
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Old 10-18-15, 09:46 PM
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Originally Posted by NormanF View Post
I'd go for the Black Lemond CX.

Consider it a poor man's do anything bike.

Throw on some all-around tires and you can hit the trails as well as ride fast on the tarmac.

Good luck.
Thank you for the reply. I find it interesting that you chose the more expensive bike and considered it "poor man's" bike. heh
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Old 10-18-15, 09:49 PM
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Originally Posted by reburbia View Post
Thank you for the reply. I find it interesting that you chose the more expensive bike and considered it "poor man's" bike. heh
A Fairdale Weekender Drop costs $1250, twice as much as the bike I mentioned.
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Old 10-18-15, 09:52 PM
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Originally Posted by NormanF View Post
A lock will deter amateurs.

If a professional bike thief wants a bike its as good as gone.

If I'm going to ride someplace I know is a high crime area, I'm going to ride the ugliest, grimy beater bike I have.

And I won't stay away from my bike any longer than absolutely necessary.
True, but other than power tools or lock-picking a U-Lock is usually pretty solid (and most thieves don't know how to pick or will be seen trying to pick it).

Originally Posted by reburbia View Post
Left the bike alone for an hour, and came back to see both my bike and the U-lock missing.
That's surprising. I mean it's obviously possible to pick them (as seen below) but usually it takes them a while (much longer than a pro like in this video) and they'll be seen. Sorry to hear about it.

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Old 10-18-15, 10:06 PM
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the whole walk home I kept thinking, "If only I just stayed with it.... If only I drove a ****ty bike... if only I had insurance... if only I used two locks.... if only I locked it in a different location...." awful feeling losing that much money + time + sentimental value

anyways, looks like one vote for the steel road bike
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Old 10-18-15, 11:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Maconi View Post
True, but other than power tools or lock-picking a U-Lock is usually pretty solid (and most thieves don't know how to pick or will be seen trying to pick it).



That's surprising. I mean it's obviously possible to pick them (as seen below) but usually it takes them a while (much longer than a pro like in this video) and they'll be seen. Sorry to hear about it.

Check out YouTube A u lock can be defeated with an angle grinder in about 1 minute. And as long as you look like you are supposed to be cutting the lock, nobody will give you a second look even the police. So basically the only person that cares whether your bike gets stolen is you. If you need to lock up regularly, get a sacrifial beater and leave the good bike at home
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Old 10-19-15, 05:47 PM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by NormanF View Post
A Fairdale Weekender Drop costs $1250, twice as much as the bike I mentioned.
Yeah true, but man that thing is sexy


I'm taking your advice and definitely going Lemond, just not necessarily that one. I came across a local with Lemond Buenos Aires. What the maximum you'd pay for this?


The only thing that worries me about it is the Carbon fork. If the fork ends up needing replacement, does anyone know if it is definitely doable to replace with a steel fork? And how much that might cost to be done by an expert up to the Lemond standards?



Also came across a another nice one, but it is 55cm, and I was told for my 5'10'' frame that 56-58 would be ideal?
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Old 10-19-15, 06:15 PM
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Originally Posted by reburbia View Post
Yeah true, but man that thing is sexy


I'm taking your advice and definitely going Lemond, just not necessarily that one. I came across a local with Lemond Buenos Aires. What the maximum you'd pay for this?


The only thing that worries me about it is the Carbon fork. If the fork ends up needing replacement, does anyone know if it is definitely doable to replace with a steel fork? And how much that might cost to be done by an expert up to the Lemond standards?



Also came across a another nice one, but it is 55cm, and I was told for my 5'10'' frame that 56-58 would be ideal?
Well I'm 5'11 and I would probably ride a 53 for a Lemond because they have a long top tube. I would think you could ride a 53 or maybe 55 Lemond but anything bigger would be too big. What size was your Focus?
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Old 10-19-15, 06:51 PM
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No idea; it was gifted to me and I never accurately measured it before it was stolen.

Hmm you're making me rethink everything. I did my measurements over at "competitive cyclist" and it spit out this: [TABLE="width: 280, align: center"]
[TR]
[TD]The Competitive Fit (cm)[/TD]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Seat Tube Range c–c:
Seat Tube Range c–t:
Top Tube Length:
Stem Length:
BB–Saddle Position:
Saddle Handlebar:
Saddle Setback:[/TD]
[TD]55.1 - 55.6 cm
56.8 - 57.3 cm
56.6 - 57 cm
12.2 - 12.8 cm
72.9 - 74.9 cm
56.8 - 57.4 cm
5.9 - 6.3 cm[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]The French Fit (cm)[/TD]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Seat Tube Range c–c:
Seat Tube Range c–t:
Top Tube Length:
Stem Length:
BB–Saddle Position:
Saddle Handlebar:
Saddle Setback:





[/TD]
[TD]58 - 58.5 cm
59.7 - 60.2 cm
57.8 - 58.2 cm
11.3 - 11.9 cm
70.4 - 72.4 cm
59.3 - 59.9 cm
6.6 - 7 cm


[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
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Old 10-19-15, 07:02 PM
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Originally Posted by reburbia View Post
No idea; it was gifted to me and I never accurately measured it before it was stolen.

Hmm you're making me rethink everything. I did my measurements over at "competitive cyclist" and it spit out this: [TABLE="width: 280, align: center"]
[TR]
[TD]The Competitive Fit (cm)[/TD]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Seat Tube Range c–c:
Seat Tube Range c–t:
Top Tube Length:
Stem Length:
BB–Saddle Position:
Saddle Handlebar:
Saddle Setback:[/TD]
[TD]55.1 - 55.6 cm
56.8 - 57.3 cm
56.6 - 57 cm
12.2 - 12.8 cm
72.9 - 74.9 cm
56.8 - 57.4 cm
5.9 - 6.3 cm[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]The French Fit (cm)[/TD]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Seat Tube Range c–c:
Seat Tube Range c–t:
Top Tube Length:
Stem Length:
BB–Saddle Position:
Saddle Handlebar:
Saddle Setback:





[/TD]
[TD]58 - 58.5 cm
59.7 - 60.2 cm
57.8 - 58.2 cm
11.3 - 11.9 cm
70.4 - 72.4 cm
59.3 - 59.9 cm
6.6 - 7 cm


[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
Ok, if you're measurements were accurate then we have a very different build because I"m a little taller than you and that fit calculator recommends me being on a bike with a 54-55 cm top tube. I believe all of the Lemonds road bikes have the same geo and a 55 has a 565 mm top tube which should be a good fit for you. So the Orange one you posted should be a good fit and looks like it's in great shape. Not sure what model it is. The higher end Lemonds had Reynolds 853 frames which is still considered high end steel. Some of the lower end ones had Reynolds 520 I believe, which is still fine just not as light
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Old 10-19-15, 07:54 PM
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Where are you located? I'm in southern california and have two 58 cm bikes that I may be looking to sell in your price range and in the neighborhood of the Lemonds you're looking at. I'm also 5'11"...
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Old 10-19-15, 08:39 PM
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Yeah let me know. I'm in the bay area
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Old 10-19-15, 09:01 PM
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insurance experience?

Since I bought my Focus Mares AX I have been contemplating putting it on my homeowners. I keep my bike in the garage and sometimes the door is left open for hours on end and I am constantly worried about it (before anyone says it, inside is not always an option for storing it).

Does anyone have their bike on their homeowners?
What is the additional cost?
Any other suggestions?

I'll accept smart-ass comments too.
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Old 10-19-15, 09:12 PM
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Speaking from experience, having just spent multiple days calling insurance companies for quotes, I would say it is almost always worth it. It cost me less than 20 bucks annually to carve out $5k special provision for my bike in the renter's insurance.

The only thing lacking is accident coverage, as that is the main reason I am not confident in buying a used titanium or carbon. The repair costs seem pretty brutal compared to steel, but someone with more experience should be able to give a more accurate assessment. Velosurance wanted a couple hundred to insure a nice bike against accidents, which is the entire cost of my renter's insurance
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Old 10-20-15, 03:21 AM
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Can someone shed light on the Lemond vs higher priced steel manufacturers?

For example, this Colnago Thron Super C95 Campagnolo Components Columbus Thron Super Tubing | eBay
What makes the colnago more expensive? Is it using a higher quality steel?
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Old 10-20-15, 04:59 AM
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I guess it's fair to say that you have lost your focus in life.

Too soon?
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Old 10-20-15, 07:33 AM
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Originally Posted by reburbia View Post
Can someone shed light on the Lemond vs higher priced steel manufacturers?

For example, this Colnago Thron Super C95 Campagnolo Components Columbus Thron Super Tubing | eBay
What makes the colnago more expensive? Is it using a higher quality steel?
Italian bike + Italian groupset = desirability amongst collectors. The Colnago will probably sell for more by the end of the auction and that's not even a very high end steel tubing or group. Lemonds are not sought after by collectors so prices tend to be lower. Good for you because they made great steel bikes. Without knowing any details about the bike youre looking at it's hard to compare it directly

edit - I see the orange Lemond on ebay. It's a cyclocross bike but it does have True Temper Ox steel which is one of the nicest steel tube you can make a bike out of. Seems like it will sell for more than I would want to spend including the shipping but it also seems like people are asking $750-1000 for a lot of Lemonds on ebay these days

Last edited by rms13; 10-20-15 at 08:03 AM.
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Old 10-20-15, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
I guess it's fair to say that you have lost your focus in life.

Too soon?


LOL....yes too soon
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Old 10-20-15, 09:15 AM
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Originally Posted by rms13 View Post
Italian bike + Italian groupset = desirability amongst collectors. The Colnago will probably sell for more by the end of the auction and that's not even a very high end steel tubing or group. Lemonds are not sought after by collectors so prices tend to be lower. Good for you because they made great steel bikes. Without knowing any details about the bike youre looking at it's hard to compare it directly

edit - I see the orange Lemond on ebay. It's a cyclocross bike but it does have True Temper Ox steel which is one of the nicest steel tube you can make a bike out of. Seems like it will sell for more than I would want to spend including the shipping but it also seems like people are asking $750-1000 for a lot of Lemonds on ebay these days


What would you consider a good value for a Lemond of that quality? Or a good price for the Colnago? I'm looking for high quality steel materials. I also like that the colnago has a steel stem, instead of the carbon (?) on the Lemond

Also came across this Buenos Aires for 800. I think it's a steel frame with a carbon fork. I assume if the carbon fork cracks, then replacing with a steel fork would not be crazy expensive? Any votes for what I should get?
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Old 10-20-15, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by reburbia View Post
What would you consider a good value for a Lemond of that quality? Or a good price for the Colnago? I'm looking for high quality steel materials. I also like that the colnago has a steel stem, instead of the carbon (?) on the Lemond

Also came across this Buenos Aires for 800. I think it's a steel frame with a carbon fork. I assume if the carbon fork cracks, then replacing with a steel fork would not be crazy expensive? Any votes for what I should get?

I've seen Lemonds in decent shape go for $350-500 in the past year. You can search ebay sold auctions to get an idea what people have been paying. The Lemond Propad is going for over $500 now with $65 shipping. I don't think that's crazy since it looks like it's in great shape.

The Buenos Aires looks like it has a dent on the top tube? Either way I would maybe pay $800 for a Buenos Aires that was NOS (new old stock aka mint). If it's used and in nice condition I would consider $500-600. The stem is probably aluminum not carbon. And carbon forks are very durable. Plenty of people riding 15-20 year old carbon forks with no issue. The BA looks like a later model which would have 1 1/8" fork which leaves you with plenty of options for a replacement fork should you ever need one. I bought a full carbon fork from Nashbar for about $100 on sale and it was great quality. Older bikes (early 90s and older) generally had 1" forks and threaded forks which are harder to find so if you did have to get a replacement you'd have much fewer choices.

If you want a Colnago or any vintage Italian steel bike you will be overpaying for what you get no matter how much you pay. That's just life. I'd look for Lemond with Ryenolds 853 or True Temper OX frame because they tend to be great values
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Old 10-20-15, 06:23 PM
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Originally Posted by rms13 View Post
I've seen Lemonds in decent shape go for $350-500 in the past year. You can search ebay sold auctions to get an idea what people have been paying. The Lemond Propad is going for over $500 now with $65 shipping. I don't think that's crazy since it looks like it's in great shape.

The Buenos Aires looks like it has a dent on the top tube? Either way I would maybe pay $800 for a Buenos Aires that was NOS (new old stock aka mint). If it's used and in nice condition I would consider $500-600. The stem is probably aluminum not carbon. And carbon forks are very durable. Plenty of people riding 15-20 year old carbon forks with no issue. The BA looks like a later model which would have 1 1/8" fork which leaves you with plenty of options for a replacement fork should you ever need one. I bought a full carbon fork from Nashbar for about $100 on sale and it was great quality. Older bikes (early 90s and older) generally had 1" forks and threaded forks which are harder to find so if you did have to get a replacement you'd have much fewer choices.

If you want a Colnago or any vintage Italian steel bike you will be overpaying for what you get no matter how much you pay. That's just life. I'd look for Lemond with Ryenolds 853 or True Temper OX frame because they tend to be great values

Thank you everyone for your seasoned advice. I ended up letting that bike go, since it was going to be nearly 700 with shipping.

A little confused because I read this http://www.vintage-trek.com/Trek-Fis...nualLemond.pdf
and it makes it seem as though the PoPrad is the only Lemond with a purely steel frame? I originally thought the Zurich was steel frame with carbon fork, but it looks as the frame itself is a mix of carbon/steel?

Last edited by reburbia; 10-20-15 at 06:32 PM.
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