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Need Metric Century Training Advise

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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Need Metric Century Training Advise

Old 11-03-15, 06:11 AM
  #26  
Homebrew01
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Originally Posted by Bassmanbob View Post

When I ride the over 50 mile rides, I am sore all over-- from my neck to my ankles. This includes my hands and arms, belly, shoulders, etc... I try to stay hydrated and take ibuprofen for the next 18 hours.
Something is really wrong .
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Old 11-03-15, 06:12 AM
  #27  
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If you've already ridden 57 miles you should know yourself if you would have been able to do another 5 miles (15-20 minutes I assume) instead of asking strangers. Kind of odd. Just suck it up and do it instead of thinking about it.
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Old 11-03-15, 06:38 AM
  #28  
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Riding 100kms shouldn't be so painful. You should finish maybe a bit tired, but not sore at all. +1 on checking your fitting.
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Old 11-03-15, 07:24 AM
  #29  
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I was fitted for the bike when I purchased it last year. I was told just last Saturday by another cyclist, who rode with me a few miles, that I may benefit from having my saddle raised a little. I'm bow legged, and he noticed my knees were out too laterally. I have to continue to remind myself to keep my knees in line while riding. I'm not convinced I need to raise my seat, but it's something worth trying (maybe 5mm on one of my shorter rides).

I know a major contributing factor to my aches and pains is that I'm a Clyde. I'm 5' 6" and 215lbs. I've lost some weight since I started cycling, but obviously not nearly enough. I'm also 50, with a very tight body frame and just started cycling 18 months ago. I stretch every day. I knew when I started that I needed to be patient with my progress.

I'll go back to my LBS and be refitted sometime this week. It's probably worth another look.
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Old 11-03-15, 07:45 AM
  #30  
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^ simple test for seat height is to put your heel on the pedal with it at its most extended position. Your leg should be fully extended, but not having to reach or rock your hips to reach the pedal.

It's just a quick and dirty rule of thumb. But if you're far off from that you might have someone look at your seat height.
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Old 11-03-15, 08:22 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Bassmanbob View Post
I was fitted for the bike when I purchased it last year. I was told just last Saturday by another cyclist, who rode with me a few miles, that I may benefit from having my saddle raised a little. I'm bow legged, and he noticed my knees were out too laterally. I have to continue to remind myself to keep my knees in line while riding. I'm not convinced I need to raise my seat, but it's something worth trying (maybe 5mm on one of my shorter rides).
If you're riding with your knees out because you're bow legged you may want longer pedal spindles or pedal extenders to widen your feet on the pedals. Raising your saddle will probably do nothing but mess up your fitting. That's actually dumb advise. Of course if you were professionally fitted then the guy should have noticed that issue.

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Old 11-03-15, 10:20 AM
  #32  
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^^^ I considered this when I had the Ilio-tibial band syndrome. With physical therapy and rest, it resolved. With continued stretching, it hasn't returned and no other problems have been occurring. So I never took the next step, but it's still in the back of my mind just in case.
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Old 11-03-15, 11:59 AM
  #33  
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Just make sure to pack some bananas and a few bars and drink often, not a lot but sip often. You'll get hungry
Have fun!
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Old 11-03-15, 12:42 PM
  #34  
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My wife and I did our first metric century a few weeks ago and I understand your 'concern'. Even though we had done a 50 miler or two, there is something mental about that next major milestone - for us it was on an unfamiliar route.
Relax, fuel and hydrate, stop when you want to, and enjoy.
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Old 11-03-15, 04:16 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by Bassmanbob View Post
I've been training for a metric century for the last six months. My strategy has been to increase my weekend ride about 10% every two weeks. The ride is in three weeks on November 22. During the week, I ride about 15-18 miles with hills on Tuesday nights and about 11- 18 miles on Thursdays. In October, my long weekend rides have been 53, 57, 57, 40 (bad day for me and with 30+ MPH cross wind) and 60 mile rides. My plan was to ride 60 miles again this Saturday and then a shorter ride (about 40 miles) the week before the metric century. My problem is that I won't have the time to ride the planned 60 mile repeat this weekend. I may be able to ride 30-35 miles Friday night, but that's it for this weekend.

Do you think I'll be OK for the MC in three weeks, with two relatively shorter rides this weekend and next weekend? How would you handle this differently?
If you've ridden this mileage, then 62 miles (100km) should not be an issue. Just dress for the weather. Drink like it's hot, even if you don't feel thirsty.

GH
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Old 11-03-15, 06:18 PM
  #36  
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If there's a strong wind, there's a real advantage to joining a group and taking turns at the front.

Have fun!
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Old 11-04-15, 10:44 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by datlas View Post
Correct. I think a lot of newbies compare a century to running a marathon. Running a marathon is hard, and if your longest run was a 1/2 marathon you are probably NOT ready. But if you can ride 35-40 miles you can ride all day long if you eat and hydrate properly.
I struggle with this one when it comes to a Century, not metric. I grant that a metric is easy for the OP. He is already riding a distance that is just under that. A true century does require more attention to hydration and calorie consumption. As a runner, I have always struggled with the comparison as biking is easier in a way. Common perception is that for every mile you run it is equal to every 3 miles that you ride. This is where I struggle because there are other factors to consider. For example, in a marathon, I do not stop. Water, gel packets, salt pills and food is all taken during the race at pace. In a ride you typically have rest stops that you get off your bike and go potty and talk. I have never been in a road bike race, so I am just referring to the average organized century ride or charity ride. They can be competitive but in general the stops are what make it different from a marathon. If you were to ride non-stop for 100 miles at a competitive pace (for you) than I would say that it is similar to running a marathon at a competitive pace (again for you). For example, if you run a marathon at 8 min per mile clips than it is probably similar to riding 100 miles at 18mph. (I am just using these numbers for perspective, they are not scientific. If you run at an 8 min miler pace and ride at a pace of 12mph, than of course the marathon is harder. In general, they are probably comparative if you compete at paces that are similar for you.
OP--You should not have a problem. Just eat right and hydrate properly. Watch your pace, especially in the beginning if you are worried. The start of all events tends to be fast. Stay within in your game.
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Old 11-04-15, 11:05 AM
  #38  
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There's a world of difference between a metric century and an.... Imperial? century, at least for me. I can ride ~60 miles without much in the way of extra prep, just my normal stuff for a ride day (proper breakfast, push hydration) and without eating on the ride. I WILL likely be in a pre-bonk place those last few miles; somewhere around 60-70 miles is where I run out of stored energy, it seems.

A century, on the other hand, mos' def' requires eating on the ride, and that needs to start pretty early in the ride to have any meaning for late in the ride.

YMMV, of course. No harm in eating early in your metric century ride.

Contact points with with the bike are likely to be what's bugging you the most. To that end, move your hands around on the bars starting well before any issues. At any excuse, get up and out of that saddle! Uses different muscles and gives your sit bone area a break and some ventilation. Again, do this BEFORE there's a problem. Foot numbness is tougher to address since you are locked more or less in one position. Just try to vary how you weight the foot and again, get up off that saddle at the slightest provocation!

A flat metric or real century would be a horror show for me. I love hills for multiple reasons, but a huge one is getting up out of that saddle. And I LIKE my saddle!
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