Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Frame Damage / Car Sped Off

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Frame Damage / Car Sped Off

Old 11-28-15, 11:57 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Eyenigma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 89
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Frame Damage / Car Sped Off

Long story short: a car turned right directly in front of me over the weekend as I was climbing a super steep hill. Luckily I was able to get on the brakes before T-boning the passenger door, but the awkward steep grade meant I stalled out on forward momentum and couldn’t unclip fast enough to prevent falling over on the curb. I'm completely fine obviously (I was literally at a standstill) but the right frame stay hit the edge of the curb as I tipped over. Shoulder landed on the sidewalk breaking the fall, but unfortunately the frame did hit the concrete.

I'll take it to the LBS just for a proper inspection, but can anyone offer insight on how best to deal with the scuffs / scratches? Over the phone, the LBS seemed concerned it was the stays, just given the importance of that geometry. In my untrained eye, I think the damage is cosmetic only. But it still sucks.

Does anyone have any tricks for minor touchups? I've heard of people using clear finger nail polish. And I've seen some videos on YouTube with patch kits. But that looks more for bigger cracks. Any opinions?

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
closeup.jpg (87.6 KB, 178 views)
File Type: jpg
frame_stays.jpg (96.5 KB, 174 views)
Eyenigma is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 02:26 AM
  #2  
Banned
 
BoSoxYacht's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: take your time, enjoy the scenery, it will be there when you get to it
Posts: 7,281

Bikes: 07 IRO BFGB fixed-gear, 07 Pedal Force RS

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
That'll buff right out.

Obviously it's just a scratch, just ride it.
BoSoxYacht is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 02:31 AM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: SoCal
Posts: 6,496
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 276 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 3 Posts
Touch up with white nail polish
rms13 is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 10:37 AM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
joejack951's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 12,100

Bikes: 2016 Hong Fu FM-079-F, 1984 Trek 660, 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1, 2016 Islabikes Beinn 20 (son's)

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1242 Post(s)
Liked 94 Times in 65 Posts
Originally Posted by BoSoxYacht
just ride it.
This, and don't ride that close to the curb any more. You are asking to get cutoff. You helped pay for the road; use it.
joejack951 is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 10:51 AM
  #5  
Banned
 
BoSoxYacht's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: take your time, enjoy the scenery, it will be there when you get to it
Posts: 7,281

Bikes: 07 IRO BFGB fixed-gear, 07 Pedal Force RS

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Eyenigma
I stalled out on forward momentum and couldn’t unclip fast enough to prevent falling over on the curb.
I don't understand how that is even possible(unless your body froze from panic).
BoSoxYacht is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 10:52 AM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 20,429

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 178 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5885 Post(s)
Liked 3,464 Times in 2,077 Posts
Originally Posted by BoSoxYacht
I don't understand how that is even possible(unless your body froze from panic).
It may be that not everyone is as skilled a bike rider as you are.
bikemig is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 10:54 AM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
cale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,248

Bikes: Kuota Ksano. Litespeed T5 gravel - brilliant!

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by BoSoxYacht
I don't understand how that is even possible(unless your body froze from panic).
Huh?
cale is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 11:01 AM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I always have trouble unclipping uphill. It is basically the only thing that keeps me from stopping most of the time. By brain says, "Yes, your legs do hurt. You could stop, but the second you try to get one of those feet out you are going to fall over."
momo15 is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 11:01 AM
  #9  
Banned
 
BoSoxYacht's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: take your time, enjoy the scenery, it will be there when you get to it
Posts: 7,281

Bikes: 07 IRO BFGB fixed-gear, 07 Pedal Force RS

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by bikemig
It may be that not everyone is as skilled a bike rider as you are.
Unclipping takes no more time than simply putting a foot down.
BoSoxYacht is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 11:03 AM
  #10  
Banned
 
BoSoxYacht's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: take your time, enjoy the scenery, it will be there when you get to it
Posts: 7,281

Bikes: 07 IRO BFGB fixed-gear, 07 Pedal Force RS

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by momo15
I always have trouble unclipping uphill. It is basically the only thing that keeps me from stopping most of the time. By brain says, "Yes, your legs do hurt. You could stop, but the second you try to get one of those feet out you are going to fall over."
I understand having trouble getting clipped in quickly, but unclipping???
BoSoxYacht is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 11:48 AM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
cale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,248

Bikes: Kuota Ksano. Litespeed T5 gravel - brilliant!

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by BoSoxYacht
I understand having trouble getting clipped in quickly, but unclipping???
Here is just one incident, chosen because I hope not to look too foolish, where I failed to unclip before falling over. I was about 1/2 way into the second day of a MS150 ride and climbing a long steep grade. The grade was so challenging that it had reduced many riders to walking. (This was pre-compact crank time and my bike was a typical "racing" model, 7-speeds in back, low of 24.)

I stood during much of the climb, rocking the bike as I climbed and making slow progress up this steep grade. Out of the right, in the corner of my eye, I noticed a car backing out of a blind drive directly in front of me. I immediately "stalled" the bike to avoid hitting it and promptly tipped over when my feet didn't release in time.

It happens.

Last edited by cale; 11-29-15 at 11:52 AM.
cale is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 11:59 AM
  #12  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Eyenigma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 89
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by BoSoxYacht
I don't understand how that is even possible(unless your body froze from panic).
Fair question, since you ask. By force of habit, at stop lights etc., I unclip with my left foot. It's just naturally what my body does (likely because I'm left handed) So when the car turned in front of me, I think at first I was surprised that the guy just didn't let me clear the intersection before initiating his right turn. So admittedly I was startled, as he cut it pretty close on my front wheel.

When I slowed abruptly to avoid hitting the car, my left foot unclipped by force of habit. But the road is crowned, which meant the bike was leaning more towards the right side of the road. The steep nature of the incline, the suddenness of it all, and I'm sure combining with suffering at 175 BPM on a cold day — I just couldn't get the right foot unclipped fast enough before the weight imbalance had me already leaning for impact.



Maybe inexperience played a part. I'm a convert from MTB, and this is my first season on road. I guess maybe the takeaway is to be more anticipatory? It all happened pretty quickly and i'm sure if i had it to do over again...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
road_crown_pull.jpg (23.7 KB, 19 views)
Eyenigma is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 12:19 PM
  #13  
blah blah blah
 
milkbaby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2,520
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I like the touch up paint for cars. I just get something relatively close in color to use. I do the touch up, wait for it to dry, and then just touch up clear coat. It's not always great looking but I spend a lot more time riding my bicycle than looking at it.
milkbaby is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 05:49 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My problem is that I don't climb enough. I live in a flat area with few hills within riding distance, so 99.9% of my unclipping happens as I roll to a stop. The bike stays upright when rolling, but steep climbs, it stops rolling as soon as you stop peddling. At this point, panic usually sets in and stiffens me up. I frequently hit steep pitches unclipped just in case. I did start cyclocross this season, which is helping me with the mechanics of unclipping under power, but like anything, it is just practice.
momo15 is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 06:32 PM
  #15  
Achtung!
 
thin_concrete's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: New England
Posts: 1,673

Bikes: 60.1, Marvel

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 515 Post(s)
Liked 268 Times in 161 Posts
When I first started becoming serious about road cycling a few months ago, I had difficulty unclipping uphill as well. I eventually figured out that it's no different than any other situation, and once that was firmly planted in my head, it got a lot easier. Keep practicing, and it's great to hear you're without serious injury and the bike suffered little damage!
thin_concrete is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 06:39 PM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 4,400

Bikes: Bianchi Infinito (Celeste, of course)

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 754 Post(s)
Liked 104 Times in 77 Posts
Originally Posted by BoSoxYacht
Unclipping takes no more time than simply putting a foot down.
Until you lift up rather than twist out. Some cleats release easier than others, a lot of it is a trained reflex action. It happens, especially if you're in-experienced and tired.

Back to the OP: Treat the scratches the same way you would door dings on your car. They're just scratches and the location is close to the rear dropout and the carbon is likely better reinforced in that location compared to the very middle of a chain stay.
gsa103 is offline  
Old 11-29-15, 08:05 PM
  #17  
- Soli Deo Gloria -
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 14,779

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 235 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6844 Post(s)
Liked 736 Times in 469 Posts
Originally Posted by milkbaby
I like the touch up paint for cars. I just get something relatively close in color to use. I do the touch up, wait for it to dry, and then just touch up clear coat. It's not always great looking but I spend a lot more time riding my bicycle than looking at it.
One could just spray the whole bike with black primer and it would look like all the other brand new bikes.
TimothyH is offline  
Old 11-30-15, 08:20 AM
  #18  
Seńor Member
 
Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 5,066
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 649 Post(s)
Liked 292 Times in 215 Posts
Originally Posted by BoSoxYacht
I don't understand how that is even possible(unless your body froze from panic).
Really? SRSLY? ???
Wilfred Laurier is offline  
Old 11-30-15, 08:46 AM
  #19  
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 39,181
Mentioned: 211 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18385 Post(s)
Liked 15,448 Times in 7,297 Posts
Originally Posted by Inpd
But for us mere mortals, we can't unclip if there is pressure on the pedal so if things go wrong (I.e. Out of the saddle and stall) you can't get back in the saddle to relieve the pressure on the foot to us clip either leg.
If not being able to unclip whilst putting downward pressure on a pedal makes one a mere mortal than I am Superman, Flash and Captain America rolled into one. I recommend that you not try a track stand at a red light.
indyfabz is offline  
Old 11-30-15, 08:53 AM
  #20  
Banned
 
BoSoxYacht's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: take your time, enjoy the scenery, it will be there when you get to it
Posts: 7,281

Bikes: 07 IRO BFGB fixed-gear, 07 Pedal Force RS

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Inpd
You had the same response for my thread. Maybe you have some super duper way of us clipping.

But for us mere mortals, we can't unclip if there is pressure on the pedal so if things go wrong (I.e. Out of the saddle and stall) you can't get back in the saddle to relieve the pressure on the foot to us clip either leg.
1. Twist your foot
2. Remove foot from pedal
3. Place foot on ground
4. Repeat as needed

Which step do you not understand?
BoSoxYacht is offline  
Old 11-30-15, 08:54 AM
  #21  
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Posts: 33,217

Bikes: 02 GTO, 2011 Magnum

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1349 Post(s)
Liked 1,243 Times in 621 Posts
Originally Posted by BoSoxYacht
Actually, I understand how it happens. The rider must be an absolute clod.
Most of us lack the ability to Think during an accident.
__________________
Fred "The Real Fred"

10 Wheels is offline  
Old 11-30-15, 08:58 AM
  #22  
Senior Member
 
cale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,248

Bikes: Kuota Ksano. Litespeed T5 gravel - brilliant!

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
I just love the idea of someone laughing at another's misfortune and then calling it a failure of talent.

I'd rather be a clod than a turd.
cale is offline  
Old 11-30-15, 09:13 AM
  #23  
Senior Member
 
joejack951's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 12,100

Bikes: 2016 Hong Fu FM-079-F, 1984 Trek 660, 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1, 2016 Islabikes Beinn 20 (son's)

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1242 Post(s)
Liked 94 Times in 65 Posts
Originally Posted by BoSoxYacht
1. Twist your foot
2. Remove foot from pedal
3. Place foot on ground
4. Repeat as needed

Which step do you not understand?
I hope you are being sincere so I'll treat your question in that manner.

It has nothing to do with understanding. It has to do with the awkwardness of unclipping in a manner that's unfamiliar to most. If you always, 100% of the time, unclip the same foot with zero pressure on the pedal and your foot at 12 o'clock, it feels very odd to try unclipping at 6 o'clock with all your weight on that foot. For starters, if you unclip the foot with all your weight on it, the weight has to go somewhere. You either slip off the pedal and your foot hits the ground eventually, or you try to transfer the weight to your other foot. To do the latter, you either end up propelling yourself forward or you need to hold the brakes extra hard to resist the bike, and thus the crank, from moving. In a panic stop, it is easy to want to not put weight on the 6 o'clock foot for that reason and while the brain tries to sort out which is the lesser evil, you lose momentum and fall.

Of course, the best thing is to be well practiced in unclipping either foot but that doesn't always fix the problem. If you've lost all momentum and start falling to the side of the bike where that foot has pressure on the pedal, you need to unclip that foot.

I've fallen once from losing momentum, doing a steep climb and stupidly trying to downshift from my middle to small ring under pressure and dropping the chain. That was on of my first rides with clipless, too. It hasn't happened again but I have had some very ungraceful dismounts from stopping short and needing to unclip my weighted foot.
joejack951 is offline  
Old 11-30-15, 09:14 AM
  #24  
Banned
 
BoSoxYacht's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: take your time, enjoy the scenery, it will be there when you get to it
Posts: 7,281

Bikes: 07 IRO BFGB fixed-gear, 07 Pedal Force RS

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by cale
From what I've read, I'm not sure you've EVER ridden a bike. You seem so completely, how do I say, inexperienced!
think whatever you want my friend.
BoSoxYacht is offline  
Old 11-30-15, 09:37 AM
  #25  
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Delaware shore
Posts: 13,556

Bikes: Cervelo C5, Guru Photon, Waterford, Specialized CX

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1104 Post(s)
Liked 2,166 Times in 1,458 Posts
Originally Posted by joejack951
It has nothing to do with understanding. It has to do with the awkwardness of unclipping in a manner that's unfamiliar to most. If you always, 100% of the time, unclip the same foot with zero pressure on the pedal and your foot at 12 o'clock, it feels very odd to try unclipping at 6 o'clock with all your weight on that foot. For starters, if you unclip the foot with all your weight on it, the weight has to go somewhere. You either slip off the pedal and your foot hits the ground eventually, or you try to transfer the weight to your other foot. To do the latter, you either end up propelling yourself forward or you need to hold the brakes extra hard to resist the bike, and thus the crank, from moving. In a panic stop, it is easy to want to not put weight on the 6 o'clock foot for that reason and while the brain tries to sort out which is the lesser evil, you lose momentum and fall.

Of course, the best thing is to be well practiced in unclipping either foot but that doesn't always fix the problem. If you've lost all momentum and start falling to the side of the bike where that foot has pressure on the pedal, you need to unclip that foot.
People fall from not unclipping because they lack experience. The experience should be gained though in a few days of riding. Lots of people do as you say - learn to unclip one foot at the same position like 12:00 every time. Then when they need to do something different, they are in trouble. It's so easy when you first get clipless to think about unclipping in a variety of pedal positions and with both feet. After a few days, you got it down.
StanSeven is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.