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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

first bike, questions

Old 02-01-16, 05:39 PM
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burnsco
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first bike, questions

So I've been wanting to get into cycling for a long time now. Decided to finally bite the bullet and saved up $1500 for a bike and accessories.

I'm eyeing two bikes at my local bike shop. The Giant Defy 3 2016 ($1020 CAD) and the Trek Domane 2.0 C 2015 ($1179 CAD on sale from $1560). I'm leaning towards the Trek because it's on sale and worth more, but other than that I have no idea which one is really a better bike. I have to get shoes, helmet, etc as well.

My bike selection is limited in my area, but are there any other bikes in this price range I should check out? Specialized Allez?

Any information would be very appreciated!

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Old 02-01-16, 06:07 PM
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The Specialized Allez is a race geometry compared to the Domane and Defy which are called Endurance bikes. Meaning a more relaxed fit for comfortable rides over a long period of time/distance. The best thing to do is ride them and decide on the bike that feels right. Chances are a test ride may be just a lap around the parking lot but if you get an opportunity go try some hills and really get a feel for the bike. I ride race geometry bikes and have zero issues going distances it's all in how the bike fits and your fitness. Focus more on how the bike fits and less on the value of bike, if it don't fit right it's overpriced no matter what.
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Old 02-01-16, 06:48 PM
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Originally Posted by FeltF2Tarmac View Post
The Specialized Allez is a race geometry compared to the Domane and Defy which are called Endurance bikes. Meaning a more relaxed fit for comfortable rides over a long period of time/distance. The best thing to do is ride them and decide on the bike that feels right. Chances are a test ride may be just a lap around the parking lot but if you get an opportunity go try some hills and really get a feel for the bike. I ride race geometry bikes and have zero issues going distances it's all in how the bike fits and your fitness. Focus more on how the bike fits and less on the value of bike, if it don't fit right it's overpriced no matter what.
so what am I looking for in the fit? I have never ridden a road bike so I don't even know what a good feel is like or not.
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Old 02-01-16, 06:53 PM
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Originally Posted by burnsco View Post
So I've been wanting to get into cycling for a long time now. Decided to finally bite the bullet and saved up $1500 for a bike and accessories.

I'm eyeing two bikes at my local bike shop. The Giant Defy 3 2016 ($1020 CAD) and the Trek Domane 2.0 C 2015 ($1179 CAD on sale from $1560). I'm leaning towards the Trek because it's on sale and worth more, but other than that I have no idea which one is really a better bike. I have to get shoes, helmet, etc as well.

My bike selection is limited in my area, but are there any other bikes in this price range I should check out? Specialized Allez?

Any information would be very appreciated!
If you have budgeted $1500 go for a new 2014, you will get a better bike than the two you mention.

Regarding shoes, helmet, pedals, etc. I'd say go online, pretty much the only thing you need to buy in store is the bike, everything else you can get cheaper on the web.

Your budget is great for getting started into cycling (not that I'm an expert or veteran by any measure) but you will soon find this is an expensive hobby/sport/activity, no matter what you buy the bike will always be incomplete.

Welcome!
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Old 02-01-16, 07:04 PM
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I haven't seen any bikes from 2014 in my local shops. What bike specifically did you mean?
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Old 02-01-16, 07:31 PM
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The best place to start is the bike shop, they can get you going in the right direction in terms of fit and what is in your budget you can find out what size frame best suites your needs and discuss what type of riding you want to do. Mainly road, maybe road and some trail.long rides or short rides. A bike shop can get you pointed in the right direction. As stated a 2014 would be new old stock usually discounted deeply so your money would go further.
Do you plan to go with a clippers pedal system or platform pedals. With clippers shoes would be an additional expense and deciding which pedals is another issue as to the difference styles. At this point just talking with a local shop and asking lots of questions is a great place to start.
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Old 02-01-16, 07:33 PM
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Originally Posted by FeltF2Tarmac View Post
The best place to start is the bike shop, they can get you going in the right direction in terms of fit and what is in your budget you can find out what size frame best suites your needs and discuss what type of riding you want to do. Mainly road, maybe road and some trail.long rides or short rides. A bike shop can get you pointed in the right direction. As stated a 2014 would be new old stock usually discounted deeply so your money would go further.
Do you plan to go with a clippers pedal system or platform pedals. With clippers shoes would be an additional expense and deciding which pedals is another issue as to the difference styles. At this point just talking with a local shop and asking lots of questions is a great place to start.
just so I'm a little more knowledgeable when I go in, what are the different pedal types for? I'm going to be doing long, endurance type rides with a little sprinting here and there. I think the bike I'm buying comes with pedals already.
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Old 02-01-16, 07:55 PM
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There are SPD, SPD SL, Speedplay clipless pedals that have a cleat screwed in to the sole of a cycling specific shoe. The SPD type pedals have a recessed cleat and allow a more enjoyable walk when not on the bike. The others force you to waddle so to speak. The platform pedal is the same style of pedal you might find on a kids bike and usually a toe clip and straps can be used with these.
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Old 02-01-16, 07:59 PM
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They are both pretty comparable. Trek has older generation Tiagra components which are probably not much better than the Sora on the Defy. The Defy is a great bike. Personally I would take the Defy of the two and save money for accessories. It's your first bike and both are on the entry level side of the spectrum. If you really get into it, you'll probably want to upgrade after a year.

You can use the platform pedals that the bike comes with at first but if you get more into riding you'll probably want to get clipless pedals and shoes so save money for that...plus the helmet, floor pump, pump/co2 for on the bike, spare tubes, tire levers, multi tool, bottles and cages, lights if you ride at night...and then eventually bib shorts and jerseys and computer if you get more into riding
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Old 02-01-16, 08:05 PM
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So to start I don't really need anything extra?I was under the assumption I needed the shoes, shorts, etc just to get started. I'm already a long distance runner and have commuted to work for years(hybrid bike) so I plan to do a lot of miles right from the start.
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Old 02-01-16, 08:08 PM
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Originally Posted by burnsco View Post
just so I'm a little more knowledgeable when I go in, what are the different pedal types for? I'm going to be doing long, endurance type rides with a little sprinting here and there. I think the bike I'm buying comes with pedals already.
You've got the basic options:
Platform Pedals - Very basic pedals you would see on department store bikes. They work but offer no foot retention or consistent foot placement. Can be worn with tennis shoes
Clip Pedals - Platform pedals with a toe cage or "clip". They offer some foot retention with straps, and a non-adjustable foot placement.

And then you have Clipless Pedals - Pedals with a mechanical binding. Offer (typically) adjustable foot retention and adjustable foot placement. Require special shoes with holds for pedal-specific cleats. They are separated into two types: Road and Mountain.
a. Road has a protruding cleat that makes walking a bit uncomfortable (think of a 1/2 inch block beneath the ball of your foot). These shoes will generally be lighter and stiffer than the mountain variant.
b. Mountain will have a recessed cleat that makes walking almost the same as if you were in tennis shoes. The extra sole to recess the cleat will make these heavier on average.

You can get away with any of these as a newbie, but the clipless pedals may make you feel more "connected" to the bike. If you want to try clipless, but intend to walk around during the breaks on those endurance rides, mountain bike shoes/pedals may be the better choice.
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