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Need suggestions on upgrading to new bike.

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Need suggestions on upgrading to new bike.

Old 03-14-16, 11:58 PM
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Liquidpotatoe
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Need suggestions on upgrading to new bike.

I have been riding my Specialized Roubaix SL2 Elite for 2.5 years now and i got it used with 1500 miles on it. I'm looking to upgrade to a new bike, something that is similar to the roubaix, anything that has a similar frame or would be perfect for the application I need it for. Even a next up roubaix(don't know which, im thinking the expert?). I ride 4-5 times a week and its mixed with long rides that include some rolling hills and long hill repeats, never any short hills for the repeats.
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Old 03-15-16, 02:34 AM
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CliffordK
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You are 2 models back, with the Roubaix SL4 being the current model.

It looks like half the new Roubaix SL4 bikes are disc bikes. Is that a consideration?

Personally I would keep the old bike, and maintain/upgrade as needed. But, each person is a bit different. You might visit some local bike shops and check out what they have. Perhaps you'd choose a different model. Tarmac?
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Old 03-15-16, 03:21 AM
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Why are you looking for an upgrade if you want something like what you already have? Are you looking for anything besides shiny newness?
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Old 03-15-16, 06:34 AM
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Originally Posted by kbarch View Post
Why are you looking for an upgrade if you want something like what you already have? Are you looking for anything besides shiny newness?
This^^^ Why upgrade to the same model unless its just a killer deal and/or you end up with premium components and wheels for little or no $$$ out of pocket.
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Old 03-15-16, 07:45 AM
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Originally Posted by kbarch View Post
Why are you looking for an upgrade if you want something like what you already have? Are you looking for anything besides shiny newness?
+1

What are you attempting to accomplish by upgrading?
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Old 03-16-16, 08:56 AM
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I had a Roubaix S-Works SL2 and then jumped to a SL4 (Expert). The difference between the two is primarily that the SL4 is a lot stiffer. The SL2 had a lot of vertical compliance which was nice but was not as responsive as the SL4. They steer the same and the SL2 is more comfortable with its compliance but did feel a bit mushy at times. It didn't actually notice that till I rode the stiffer SL4. For long rides though, it was amazing. The SL4 is more responsive and stiffer/harsher over time but still very stable and with a nice seat post (CG-R or FSA or Syntace) it is pretty balanced. Without a nice seat post, it can feel a bit too stiff in the back while the front is still very compliant.

Like someone asked, what do you want to achieve with this. A stiffer and lighter bike may shave a couple of minutes off a 60-minute ride but it that what you want? The SL2 is the most comfortable bike I have ridden. I don't know much about the SL3.
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Old 03-16-16, 09:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Chandne View Post
I had a Roubaix S-Works SL2 and then jumped to a SL4 (Expert). The difference between the two is primarily that the SL4 is a lot stiffer. The SL2 had a lot of vertical compliance which was nice but was not as responsive as the SL4. They steer the same and the SL2 is more comfortable with its compliance but did feel a bit mushy at times. It didn't actually notice that till I rode the stiffer SL4. For long rides though, it was amazing. The SL4 is more responsive and stiffer/harsher over time but still very stable and with a nice seat post (CG-R or FSA or Syntace) it is pretty balanced. Without a nice seat post, it can feel a bit too stiff in the back while the front is still very compliant.
So what you're saying is: the SL4 is laterally stiff, yet vertically compliant.
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Old 03-16-16, 10:42 AM
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When compared to the SL2, it is definitely even vertically stiffer...that is most noticeable to me. It is probably laterally stiffer but I only say that because it is a bit easier to carve fast turns on it and stand and pedal. I'm not too well-versed in lateral and vertical and related carbon layup. However, my SL2 had Easton SLX70 wheels and the SL4 has DT240s (24x28) with CX Rays and Pacenti SL23s, so the SL4's wheel set may be stiffer. The SL4 just feels stiffer all around but some may say it is too stiff for a true endurance bike, at least without a flexier seat post. I had the CG-R and then bought a FSA and both were softer than the stock post, which I preferred.
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Old 03-16-16, 10:51 AM
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Do it! SL 4 Expert is $500 off right now, groovy seat post, Ultegra , 10r frame. Not sure why some are asking "why upgrade"? More advanced frame for a guy riding several times a week..shiny and new..we can all relate, no?
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Old 03-16-16, 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by dcsix View Post
Do it! SL 4 Expert is $500 off right now, groovy seat post, Ultegra , 10r frame. Not sure why some are asking "why upgrade"? More advanced frame for a guy riding several times a week..shiny and new..we can all relate, no?
Not to be critical--do what you want with your money--but I CAN'T relate anymore. Like everybody else, I imagine, I went through about 10 years of being equipment-crazed. I spent thousands of dollars (at least) on shiny new stuff, and almost none of it made any difference. A change is not necessarily an "upgrade," it's just a change. Figure out what you need to do what you want to do, then buy that. You'll be happier in the long run.
As for the groovy seat post... Seriously? I have five bikes in my garage, and I couldn't tell you what any of the seat posts look like.
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Old 03-17-16, 05:51 AM
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I cant speak to tne frame. But if you have been generally satisfied, you mignt consider keeping the frame and upgarding some key parts. Notably wheels and cranks. Wheels and cranks that come stock with mid range bikes generally arent great so upgrading will save you significant weight. More importantly, new wheels will give you a quite an upgrade in ride quality...at least thats been my experience going from narrow stock wheels to wider lighter custom wheels.

Above all said, the upgrades I am suggesting probabaly wont be any cheaper than a whole new bike, but then the wheels that come with your new bike wont be as good as ones you could have built.

Last edited by DOS; 03-17-16 at 08:25 AM.
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