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Name-brand recognized endurance frame sets

Old 06-03-16, 04:29 PM
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Inpd
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Name-brand recognized endurance frame sets

Hi,

So I learnt after my long distance rides recently, that the Venturi needs an endurance geometry brother (or sister).

I loved building up my Venturi from the frameset, it was easy and I got exactly the bike I wanted.

But, another thing I've learnt is as nice as the Venturi is, I probably couldn't sell it easily, as the public wants Cannondales, Treks, Specialized, Bianchi etc not matter how good the Venturi is.

So I'm in the market for a: 1) name recognized and 2) endurance geometry frameset. I've learnt from you all that material isn't as important as geometry so CF, ALU or Steel are all options now.

I'm willing to pay upto $1K for the frameset but clearly the cheaper the better. Now before someone says you can buy a complete bike for $1K remember that the cost of ownership is not what you for the bike the day you buy it, it should include all those upgrades you do during the first year a well. The Venturi I put together for under $900 and I have not upgraded a single thing on it in over 2000 miles.
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Old 06-03-16, 04:39 PM
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I guess I'm just curious why you're specifying you need a bike that can sell easily? Are you a new-bike-every-year kinda rider?
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Old 06-03-16, 04:51 PM
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^^^ And if you are, why are you concerned with the cost of upgrading? Do you not already have nice parts you can just move over to the new bike?

Building from scratch is always either more expensive or more time consuming (arguably those two things are redundant) than just buying a complete bike. Then sell unneeded parts off the new-to-you bike to pay for odds and ends.
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Old 06-03-16, 05:58 PM
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I've only been riding for 14 months!

Originally Posted by Sy Reene View Post
I guess I'm just curious why you're specifying you need a bike that can sell easily? Are you a new-bike-every-year kinda rider?
I'm a new rider so I'm not sure as yet. I doubt it, but I want an option of at least selling something if 2 years down the track my interests change to say gravel grinding.
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Old 06-03-16, 06:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Inpd View Post
I'm a new rider so I'm not sure as yet. I doubt it, but I want an option of at least selling something if 2 years down the track my interests change to say gravel grinding.
Bicycles are not a hot commodity item with quick return on an investment when no longer of interest, everyone else feels the same only more so.
The "better" machines are part hi-tech but mostly fashion and a sure big loss leader when today's stage of the art is tomorrow's obsolescent with a stink of old fish on it.

That being said a properly selected and fitted machine of suitable versatility or precise requirement can stay in service for decades, some of mine have.
It's mostly about the fit and putting in the seat time necessary for effective cycling, not the flavor of the Hardware.

I've never once considered what the residual value of any machine that I've built over the years would be, just it's required function.

As always, suit yourself.

PS: Merckx: always the right answer when in doubt in selecting a proper gentleman's frameset for moving right smartly along on indifferent surfaces.

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Old 06-03-16, 06:32 PM
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Unless you really feel like you are going to ride the venturi a lot, I would also consider just doing a frame swap and selling the venturi frame to offset the cost of the new frame. The two most obvious bikes are the Synapse and Defy. You should be able to find lightly used carbon frames on ebay in your price range. If you want steel, Gunnar isn't far out of your price range: Gunnar Sport ? Long distance riding in comfort from Gunnar Cycles USA
Soma Smoothie and ES aren't true endurance frames but they have taller head tubes and I had a Smoothie for a while and it was comfortable
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Old 06-03-16, 06:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
Bicycles are not a hot commodity item with quick return on an investment when no longer of interest, everyone else feels the same only more so.
-Bandera
Of course, but at least I can sell the damn thing. I got stuck with a Motobecane Track for a while I wasn't riding and was just taking up garage space.

Originally Posted by rms13 View Post
Unless you really feel like you are going to ride the venturi a lot, I would also consider just doing a frame swap and selling the venturi frame to offset the cost of the new frame. The two most obvious bikes are the Synapse and Defy. You should be able to find lightly used carbon frames on ebay in your price range. If you want steel, Gunnar isn't far out of your price range: Gunnar Sport ? Long distance riding in comfort from Gunnar Cycles USA
Soma Smoothie and ES aren't true endurance frames but they have taller head tubes and I had a Smoothie for a while and it was comfortable
I intend to ride the Venturi a lot and won't sell it. But for those centuries I want to ride something a bit more suitable for that purpose.

As much as I wanted a Synapse I want to buy a new frameset so I get some sort of warranty.

i remember you talking about your Smoothie fondly but I suspect that Soma doesn't have wide scale recognition enough.
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Old 06-03-16, 07:30 PM
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For a complete endurance bike, maybe Giant Defy, Cannondale Synapse, Trek Domaine, Canyon Endurance, Specialized Roubaix, BMC Grand Fondo, and others?

Buyer's guide: 2016 sportive and endurance road bikes + 19 great choices | road.cc
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Old 06-03-16, 10:09 PM
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I've sold lots of bikes and as long as the asking price is reasonable, they go quickly. If something is hard to sell, mostly likely the seller is sucking too much.

If a Motorbecane track bike doesnt sell, it's not the Motobecane name; it's that the demand for track bikes is small. I sold mine quickly by having a flip/flop hub and advertising as a single speed that easily converts to a fixie.
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Old 06-03-16, 10:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Inpd View Post
Hi,

So I learnt after my long distance rides recently, that the Venturi needs an endurance geometry brother (or sister).
two things:

1) define "long distance" -- 50k? 100k? 300k?
2) it's "learned." "learnt" is not a word.

bonus: Bike frames don't really have resale such that you can swap every couple seasons and expect quality resale. Don't use that as a primary component. Instead, what about "long" distance rides is the Venturi not doing it for you? Use those differences as your guidance into your next frame. Move parts over and sell the Venturi frame to offset.

double bonus: As your needs shift and wander is exactly what N+1 is all about. Not just one bike, but a few. Welcome to the hobby of the sport.
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Old 06-03-16, 10:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Inpd View Post
i remember you talking about your Smoothie fondly but I suspect that Soma doesn't have wide scale recognition enough.
I was *this* close to a Smoothie when I moved from an aluminum crit frame. Would be an admirable choice for centuries.
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Old 06-03-16, 10:53 PM
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Originally Posted by superdex View Post
2) it's "learned." "learnt" is not a word.
Around here it's a word, a word in common usage, and that's good enough for Scrabble.
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Old 06-03-16, 10:58 PM
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Trek, Specialized, Bianchi, Felt, Giant, Cannondale, and some more. Any "name brand" - look on the internet, you'll find them all.
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Old 06-03-16, 11:41 PM
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Trek Domane & Specialized Roubaix are easily the most popular by a huge margin. I suspect Giant Defy is probably third. Obviously, this is for the USDM, Europe will be more Canyon/BMC/etc.
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Old 06-04-16, 10:16 AM
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Ridley Fenix
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Old 06-04-16, 10:47 AM
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Ridley Fenix, Spesh Roubaix, Trek Domane, Cannondale Synapse, Orbea Avant, Fuji Gran Fondo, Ribble Gran Fondo, Scott CR/Solace. Stradalli Solerno (at least I think this is their version.)They don't get overly descriptive on their website and I've spent zero time looking at the geometry of their bikes.
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Old 06-04-16, 12:34 PM
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How bout you just add some more spacers to your Venturi and get that stack height up?
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Old 06-04-16, 02:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Dan333SP View Post
How bout you just add some more spacers to your Venturi and get that stack height up?
I thought of that, but a few things meant I don't think it will work.

a) The elongated Venturi top tube is great for aero-dynamics and pedaling hard but is not comfortable after about 80 miles.
b) The Venturi is steel but doesn't have any other road dampening technology (i.e. elastomers) that are supposed to make some of these other bikes amazingly smooth.
c) The wheelbase is relatively short
d) It can only handle 25mm tires and I was hoping to get 28mm tires.

and e) not required, but having eyelets to mount a rack for food on more remote longer rides would be nice.
Maybe I'm drinking the marketing Kool-aide, but aren't endurance bikes much more than a taller head tube?

Last edited by Inpd; 06-04-16 at 02:54 PM.
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Old 06-04-16, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Inpd View Post
I thought of that, but a few things meant I don't think it will work.

a) The elongated Venturi top tube is great for aero-dynamics and pedaling hard but is not comfortable after about 80 miles.
b) The Venturi is steel but doesn't have any other road dampening technology (i.e. elastomers) that are supposed to make some of these other bikes amazingly smooth.
c) The wheelbase is relatively short
d) It can only handle 25mm tires and I was hoping to get 28mm tires.

and e) not required, but having eyelets to mount a rack for food on more remote longer rides would be nice.
Maybe I'm drinking the marketing Kool-aide, but aren't endurance bikes much more than a taller head tube?
The least expensive option is to improve your fitness. I'm still riding slammed stem race bikes with long top tubes for my height. I don't ride 400k's anymore but when I did, a few years ago, I rode a race bike with 23mm tires at 140 lbs. Reduces saddle time, y'know. Long distance is a heckuve lot more about fitness than fit. And you sure as heck don't need eyelets to do LD rides. You do need the right kit and accessories. Just another opinion.
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Old 06-04-16, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
And you sure as heck don't need eyelets to do LD rides. You do need the right kit and accessories. Just another opinion.
Eyelets would be nice so I can attach some sort of thing to store food and water. I just did a double century but I had to plan the ride to hit towns around lunch and dinner. If I choose a more desolate route where would I store the food and extra water? I needed five bottles of water at least.
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Old 06-04-16, 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Inpd View Post
The elongated Venturi top tube is great for aero-dynamics and pedaling hard but is not comfortable after about 80 miles.
Maybe I'm drinking the marketing Kool-aide, but aren't endurance bikes much more than a taller head tube?
"Endurance" used to be considered one attribute of a well conditioned rider, not a marketing term.

If you plan on doing regular longer distance riding going over the Stickies in the BF Forum: Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling before spending another $ on hardware may make some sense. Or not.

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Old 06-04-16, 03:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Inpd View Post
I thought of that, but a few things meant I don't think it will work.

a) The elongated Venturi top tube is great for aero-dynamics and pedaling hard but is not comfortable after about 80 miles.
b) The Venturi is steel but doesn't have any other road dampening technology (i.e. elastomers) that are supposed to make some of these other bikes amazingly smooth.
c) The wheelbase is relatively short
d) It can only handle 25mm tires and I was hoping to get 28mm tires.

and e) not required, but having eyelets to mount a rack for food on more remote longer rides would be nice.
Maybe I'm drinking the marketing Kool-aide, but aren't endurance bikes much more than a taller head tube?
What size do you ride? I want to unload a smoothie frame and (carbon) fork
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Old 06-04-16, 03:36 PM
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Originally Posted by CafeVelo View Post
What size do you ride? I want to unload a smoothie frame and (carbon) fork
Is it the regular version or the ES version?

Based on this geometry chart Smoothie | SOMA Fabrications I would ride a 52 or 54.
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Old 06-04-16, 03:43 PM
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Ah, it wouldn't fit then. It's a 56
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Old 06-04-16, 03:48 PM
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Originally Posted by CafeVelo View Post
Ah, it wouldn't fit then. It's a 56
That's a shame. Just out of curiosity, what does a second hand Smoothie frame go for? Brand new they are $400 now with free shipping.

There is a lot to like about the Smoothie frame, what I don't like about Soma is their warranty:

"THREE YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY Soma warrants to the original owner that the workmanship of this new Soma frame pur-chased from an authorized Soma dealer shall be free of defective materials or workman-ship for the first three years of ownership by the original owner. During the warranty period:Soma at its sole option shall replace the frame if Soma determines the frame is defectiveand subject to this limited warranty. All labor charges for warranty services are the responsi-bility of the frame owner. The original owner shall pay all shipping charges connected withthe replacement of the frame. "
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