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New Bike Help - Cannondale, Specialized or Pinarello

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New Bike Help - Cannondale, Specialized or Pinarello

Old 06-28-16, 11:15 PM
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juststickit124
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New Bike Help - Cannondale, Specialized or Pinarello

Hey All! Eager to get a new bike over the 4th of July weekend and need some help deciding between my 3 favorite that are in my price range ($3500-$4000)

I usually ride 80-100mi. per week, I work a lot so only go out for 1.5-2 hours 4-5 times a week. I live in an area with lots of rolling to moderate inclines, really no flat land around here. Usually routes are through canyon roads, smooth to decent pavement, no gravel or anything like that.

Here's my options, I have test ridden them all, just trying to see where the best money spent will be.

1. Pinarello Gan S Ultegra - not many reviews or info on first hand experience from what I can find. This bike feels and rides great, just wondering if it's a little too much for a newbie like me. It's a tad flashy and not sure I would take advantage of all the "tech" and "aero" features.

2. 2015 Specialized Tarmac Expert -
From what I read this is a fantastic bike. Everything in my really wants to love this bike but for some reason it just seems like a very harsh ride. I feel every bump, pebble, however the bike is very quick and sturdy.

3. Cannondale Custom Build - Local dealer has a 2014 Evo Hi-Mod Team frame. Would be built be ultegra DI2 and the stock items from a 2016 supersix evo (no hi-mod). I test rode the 2016 Evo and Hi-Mod, both feel wonderful and seem to be comfortable. This one is tricky those cause I can't really test ride the 2014 frame since it's not built yet and they wont build it just for a test ride. From what the dealer told me the frame is the same as the SS non hi-mod, so would be better, but not as good as the 2016 hi-mod.


Any advice would be greatly appreciate. My gut is telling me the Cannondale will be the best all around, plus the Di2 is a really nice feature they're throwing on.

Thanks!
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Old 06-28-16, 11:18 PM
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I'll take Door No. 3 please
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Old 06-28-16, 11:43 PM
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Another vote for no 3. I really like Di2 and since you say the ones you rode felt great seems like a winner. I will say the Tarmac is a great bike with 25's at the right pressure would be a pretty nice ride.
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Old 06-29-16, 12:11 AM
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Which stock parts are they using to build the Cannondale? Wheels and cranks differ between models. Depending on price they are charging it may or may not be a great deal. I assume it's 11 speed Di2? I'd just be wary if they are frankensteining a bunch of parts they have laying around that they want to get rid of. But if price is right for the build I would also go with the 'Dale.

Man, I wish I "only" had time to get out for 1.5-2 hrs 4-5 days a week. II have a busy job and 1 year old kid and I feel lucky to get out 1 day a week for 2 hours haha
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Old 06-29-16, 04:12 AM
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I just bought a new Cannondale this weekend and looked at both of the other bikes you are talking about. The Tarmac was a bit of a rough ride for me and more race oriented. The Pinarello is a gorgeous bike and I might have bought it but I got totally ignored at the shop. The crew at the Cannondale shop were great and I love the bike. Ended up with a 2016 Evo HiMod Dura Ace. Good luck with the shopping.
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Old 06-29-16, 07:53 AM
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If this is your first bike get a steel bike. I have two bikes and both are steel, a Serotta Fierte with Carbon Rear and Colnago Master. Both are fitted with Campy components and both have over 7,500 miles on them without anything but minor adjustments.

I hate Shimano components because many things cannot be rebuilt and I hate all the useless changes to them every year.

Don't fall into the trap that all carbon, all titanium or all aluminum bikes are best.
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Old 06-29-16, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Mulberry20 View Post
If this is your first bike get a steel bike. I have two bikes and both are steel, a Serotta Fierte with Carbon Rear and Colnago Master. Both are fitted with Campy components and both have over 7,500 miles on them without anything but minor adjustments.

I hate Shimano components because many things cannot be rebuilt and I hate all the useless changes to them every year.

Don't fall into the trap that all carbon, all titanium or all aluminum bikes are best.
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Old 06-29-16, 08:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Wested View Post
Happens to be true. You can build a De Rosa Corum for that budget. No reason to buy a pre-built bike, especially with garden variety Shimano components.

I would stay away from all carbon bikes.
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Old 06-29-16, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Mulberry20 View Post
If this is your first bike get a steel bike. I have two bikes and both are steel, a Serotta Fierte with Carbon Rear and Colnago Master. Both are fitted with Campy components and both have over 7,500 miles on them without anything but minor adjustments.

I hate Shimano components because many things cannot be rebuilt and I hate all the useless changes to them every year.

Don't fall into the trap that all carbon, all titanium or all aluminum bikes are best.
I'm a steel fan, too, but his list doesn't indicate an interest in that. Besides, budget-wise, a Colnago Master with Campy is going to run $5-6k+

If the Tarmac doesn't feel right, cross it off the list- you won't talk yourself into liking it. If the Pinarello shop gave you attitude, don't buy that one, either. They don't deserve your business and you won't want to go back there. The Cannondale will probably make a great bike, if you're interested in DI2, but it's a lot to spend on a bike you can't try first.

You might like the Roubaix over the Tarmac, comfort wise. And there's plenty of Cannondale's out there, a Synapse maybe?

Do try a steel bike if you can find one, though.
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Old 06-29-16, 08:33 AM
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You can build a fine DeSalvo steel frame for $2,000, with carbon in the rear and the fork. If the budget for the top end is $4,000, it can work.
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Old 06-29-16, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Mulberry20 View Post
If this is your first bike get a steel bike. I have two bikes and both are steel, a Serotta Fierte with Carbon Rear and Colnago Master. Both are fitted with Campy components and both have over 7,500 miles on them without anything but minor adjustments.

I hate Shimano components because many things cannot be rebuilt and I hate all the useless changes to them every year.

Don't fall into the trap that all carbon, all titanium or all aluminum bikes are best.
Every part of your post is ridiculous. FIrst, why assume this is OP's first bike? His profile says he has a Cervelo R3 so I'm assuming this is not his first bike. I've had several steel bikes and currently have a Wraith with Campy components that I just go which is my ride of choice now but I also have owned a couple of carbon bikes and aluminum bikes and they have all been great just different.

I've also had Shimano on most of my bikes and even after several thousand miles it all worked great without needing to be adjusted and I certainly never needed to rebuild or replace any of t because it has been bulletproof. And if the time comes to replace it, Shimano is half the price of Campy so you can almost afford to pay for 2 complete DA groups for the price of Super Record so in the long run value isn't much different And many people don't hold onto a bike long enough to need to worry about that
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Old 06-29-16, 09:01 AM
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Why not get a NEW 2016 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Ultegra. MSRP is $4260 but you should be able to get it at a lower price below your upper price range.
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Old 06-29-16, 09:10 AM
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Originally Posted by juststickit124 View Post
Hey All! Eager to get a new bike over the 4th of July weekend and need some help deciding between my 3 favorite that are in my price range ($3500-$4000)

I usually ride 80-100mi. per week, I work a lot so only go out for 1.5-2 hours 4-5 times a week. I live in an area with lots of rolling to moderate inclines, really no flat land around here. Usually routes are through canyon roads, smooth to decent pavement, no gravel or anything like that.

Here's my options, I have test ridden them all, just trying to see where the best money spent will be.

1. Pinarello Gan S Ultegra - not many reviews or info on first hand experience from what I can find. This bike feels and rides great, just wondering if it's a little too much for a newbie like me. It's a tad flashy and not sure I would take advantage of all the "tech" and "aero" features.

2. 2015 Specialized Tarmac Expert -
From what I read this is a fantastic bike. Everything in my really wants to love this bike but for some reason it just seems like a very harsh ride. I feel every bump, pebble, however the bike is very quick and sturdy.

3. Cannondale Custom Build - Local dealer has a 2014 Evo Hi-Mod Team frame. Would be built be ultegra DI2 and the stock items from a 2016 supersix evo (no hi-mod). I test rode the 2016 Evo and Hi-Mod, both feel wonderful and seem to be comfortable. This one is tricky those cause I can't really test ride the 2014 frame since it's not built yet and they wont build it just for a test ride. From what the dealer told me the frame is the same as the SS non hi-mod, so would be better, but not as good as the 2016 hi-mod.


Any advice would be greatly appreciate. My gut is telling me the Cannondale will be the best all around, plus the Di2 is a really nice feature they're throwing on.

Thanks!
Sounds like option 3 is actually too much the tech and not pinerello . i had a supersix but hear great reviews from folks that ride the Evo. When buying a bike, dont' buy one to please people or try to fit in. Just buy what you love and enjoy it. Although i love my Dogma, i would go option 3 with Di2, saves you tuneups headaches
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Old 06-29-16, 10:04 AM
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Go with the Evo from Newbury Park. Ben will hook you up! Come show it off at the CVC ride when you get it.
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Old 06-29-16, 10:39 AM
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Myself, I would lean towards the Pinarello. You say "This bike feels and rides great", and that's the most important thing to me. Personally, I'm not interested in Di2*, and Ultegra works pretty much like a dream. Do you prefer the way the Cannondale rides or something? If not, why not just buy the Pinarello?

*not entirely true anymore, as the new Dura-Ace Electronic with the smart shifting sounds amazing. The smart shifting *finally* adds something new and valuable to cycling, rather than just making something that already works fine mechanically now need batteries. That said, I'll wait for this new tech to come down to the ultegra level.
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Old 06-29-16, 11:55 AM
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Originally Posted by rms13 View Post
Every part of your post is ridiculous. FIrst, why assume this is OP's first bike? His profile says he has a Cervelo R3 so I'm assuming this is not his first bike. I've had several steel bikes and currently have a Wraith with Campy components that I just go which is my ride of choice now but I also have owned a couple of carbon bikes and aluminum bikes and they have all been great just different.

I've also had Shimano on most of my bikes and even after several thousand miles it all worked great without needing to be adjusted and I certainly never needed to rebuild or replace any of t because it has been bulletproof. And if the time comes to replace it, Shimano is half the price of Campy so you can almost afford to pay for 2 complete DA groups for the price of Super Record so in the long run value isn't much different And many people don't hold onto a bike long enough to need to worry about that
There is no mention of another bike in his first post. The bikes he mentioned are usually mentioned by first-timers with some money to spend. I would not recommend spending 3k-4k for a mass-produced bike. Its absurd.

As for Shimano vs Campy, you can get Record or Chorus, still better than anything Shimano makes.
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Old 06-29-16, 12:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Mulberry20 View Post
There is no mention of another bike in his first post. The bikes he mentioned are usually mentioned by first-timers with some money to spend. I would not recommend spending 3k-4k for a mass-produced bike. Its absurd.

As for Shimano vs Campy, you can get Record or Chorus, still better than anything Shimano makes.


Aside from the bike that he listed, what did you think the OP was riding 80-100 miles/wk on?

Even if it's 'not real', it still counts as a bike IMO.
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Old 06-29-16, 01:06 PM
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Stop feeding him
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Old 06-30-16, 05:45 AM
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As the owner of 2 Pinarellos, my choice would be#1. They are great bikes.
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Old 06-30-16, 06:26 AM
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you were leaning toward option 3 from the start.

Wheel and tire choice will alter the ride significantly. Coming from 2 tarmacs I am a little partial toward them.

from what you are presenting I would go with option 3.
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Old 06-30-16, 07:03 AM
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Out of the three, I'd choose the Pinarello, but that's according to my personal taste - and it's not me buying the bike, it's you. Any of the three will be an excellent choice, there isn't a significant objective difference between them. Get the one that excites you the most.
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Old 06-30-16, 07:15 AM
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If you can test ride the Tarmac with 25c tires you might find the ride much more comfortable. I have the same Tarmac; it originally had 23c tires but I swapped them out for 25c Conti 4000SII and the quality of the ride became much more enjoyable.

I suspect you really can't go wrong with any of the choices - that being said I would consider what level of service you can expect after the purchase.

Last edited by supercharger; 06-30-16 at 07:20 AM.
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Old 06-30-16, 08:26 PM
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Go with the Pina
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Old 06-30-16, 08:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Mulberry20 View Post
There is no mention of another bike in his first post. The bikes he mentioned are usually mentioned by first-timers with some money to spend. I would not recommend spending 3k-4k for a mass-produced bike. Its absurd.

As for Shimano vs Campy, you can get Record or Chorus, still better than anything Shimano makes.
Many things can't be rebuilt on modern Campagnolo either.
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Old 07-01-16, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Mulberry20 View Post
If this is your first bike get a steel bike. I have two bikes and both are steel, a Serotta Fierte with Carbon Rear and Colnago Master. Both are fitted with Campy components and both have over 7,500 miles on them without anything but minor adjustments.
I hate Shimano components because many things cannot be rebuilt and I hate all the useless changes to them every year.
Don't fall into the trap that all carbon, all titanium or all aluminum bikes are best.
I only half assume that you are simply trolling with this post. The OP listed 3 very specific bikes to offer advise on and you go off on a Steel and Campy rant. Why? He did not ask for advice on Steel or Campy.
Shimano is anything but a bad product. In fact, I am certain that the bulk of people on this board have it. Personally, I ride Campy but that does not mean that I find anything wrong with Shimano. It is just a personal preference.
Steel is a fine product, as is TI and aluminum and Carbon. Steel and TI are niche products at this point in time. They are awesome, in fact, I am looking for a steel frame now. However, aluminum and carbon are much more prevalent today for multiple reasons.
OP, it sounds like you have already made up your mind. They are all nice bikes but if you did not like the one, and you can't test the Pinarello it looks like option 3 is the winner.
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