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2017 Specialized Roubaix review

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

2017 Specialized Roubaix review

Old 09-10-16, 03:21 PM
  #51  
American Euchre
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Hey, thanks for the writeup, dwing. We're looking to more reviews and ride impressions in the weeks and months to come.
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Old 09-10-16, 05:31 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by dwing View Post
There is near zero road feel to your hands... Which is good or bad depending what youre looking for. And It has a weird squishy feel to it when standing and leaning on the bars.
How did you find the the rear end compliance? I do get what you're saying about too much isolation. The Domane 6 series I test road was excellent at isolating you from the road but it definitely mutes the riding experience to an extent. I like the new Domane SLR approach where it can be adjusted as stiff as an Emonda or 12% more compliant than the regular Domane.

At least the front end shock is adjustable with different springs. And the rear end takes a standard seat post so you could install one of the Ergon seat posts if you want something more compliant than the CG-R.

Best soft-riding rigid seatposts for road, dirt, and gravel - BikeRadar Australia
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Old 09-10-16, 07:43 PM
  #53  
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I wasn't thinking too much about the back end compliance when i rode it so i cant speak to the effectiveness of the SP and clamp design. I'll pay attention to it next time i ride it, and maybe i'll take my 2016 along to swap back and forth for an hour.
Today i purposely rode hard and fast over sewer covers and drain grates quite afew times concentrating on the shock design. These manhole covers had several inch drops and i know they would be significant hits on my 2016...Enough that it would rattle me and possibly wrench my steering. So the first time i rode through one i slowed to what i would normally do. The hit was so subdued it surprised me. So i just started picking up the speed and running thru each of these covers and over grates and anything with sizeable bumps and the steering didnt jerk out of control .. It just pushed right through it. Very impressive.

I dont want to sound overly positive so here's some balancing feedback. The bike felt slow.. Maybe better words would be it felt too soft with little road feel. It was an elite 102 group with praxis crank and i think 28 tires. Was it really slow, most likely not , but it felt sluggish. I tried diving into a corner a few times and i was fooled.. It didnt corner as tight as I expected. There would be a learning curve like most bike changes.

Also, it put me in a more aggressive position on tops than my 2016. I'd be interested to know if it could be adjusted to get me upright enough to be comfortable for longer rides given the hardware thats in my neck. Sounds like the geo is moving toward Tarmac which i couldnt handle. I'd also be interested to see what happens on climbs.. Particulary when leaning on the bars and working them hard.

Can anyone explain the beavertail piece of the shock system? There's a tongue attached to the headset facing toward the seatpost and integrated into the design of the frame that swivels back and forth with the steering. When the wheel is straight the beavertail meshes into to the top of the frame. It sticks out side to side when steering left or right. Weird.
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Old 09-10-16, 08:56 PM
  #54  
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Hey, maybe they can use this on motorcycles.... forget about suspension and spring load the handle bars.......should work good.

Ya, that's it... make the frames stiffer and smaller, start selling diapers for your @ss, and then come up with a springer bike to sell as well.
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Old 09-10-16, 10:27 PM
  #55  
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I have a Cannondale Slate, which has a suspension fork, and I really think it is overkill. Most of the magic is due to tires. Wider tires and supple tires are the way to go. Fairly cost effective and there are many choices. You want a road bike, put on skinny tires, want a gravel bike? Put wider tires. Companies need to find a way to make a splash to entice buyers. No offense to specialized or Cannondale, but I think there are simpler solutions.
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Old 09-11-16, 06:38 AM
  #56  
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I thought you weren't supposed to put much weight on the bars. You know - a strong core to support your upper body weight with a light grip on the bars.
This design requires you to put more of your weight on the bars to be noticeable.
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Old 09-11-16, 11:53 AM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by ckindt View Post
I thought you weren't supposed to put much weight on the bars. You know - a strong core to support your upper body weight with a light grip on the bars.
This design requires you to put more of your weight on the bars to be noticeable.
The reviews clearly state that this is a stiction free design which doesn't require the rider to weight the bike differently when riding seated.

Even with standing climbing or sprinting, the movement does not rob efficiency.

Your claim is clearly erroneous. Please read up before commenting.
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Old 09-11-16, 11:55 AM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by Spadmike View Post
I have a Cannondale Slate, which has a suspension fork, and I really think it is overkill. Most of the magic is due to tires. Wider tires and supple tires are the way to go. Fairly cost effective and there are many choices. You want a road bike, put on skinny tires, want a gravel bike? Put wider tires. Companies need to find a way to make a splash to entice buyers. No offense to specialized or Cannondale, but I think there are simpler solutions.
You can't possibly know that. At least test ride the bike first. You can't generalize from the slate to the specialized.

Wider tires can be less efficient and more squirrelly with narrower rims.
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Old 09-11-16, 12:10 PM
  #59  
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I do know as I own a Cannondale slate. And the rims on the slate are not narrow. Gravel riders have seemed to figure it out. I also think you need to take your own advice. Ride it and then judge.
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Old 09-11-16, 12:13 PM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by American Euchre View Post
The reviews clearly state that this is a stiction free design which doesn't require the rider to weight the bike differently when riding seated.

Even with standing climbing or sprinting, the movement does not rob efficiency.

Your claim is clearly erroneous. Please read up before commenting.

So how effective is the front suspension if you don't put any weight on the bars?
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Old 09-11-16, 02:31 PM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by Spadmike View Post
I do know as I own a Cannondale slate. And the rims on the slate are not narrow. Gravel riders have seemed to figure it out. I also think you need to take your own advice. Ride it and then judge.
You've never ridden the 17 roubaix. You're just talking out of your rear end. If you haven't realized by now, this is a thread on the new roubaix.
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Old 09-11-16, 02:36 PM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by American Euchre View Post
You've never ridden the 17 roubaix. You're just talking out of your rear end. If you haven't realized by now, this is a thread on the new roubaix.
Of course I do. I at least have spent time on a suspension road bike. I at least have some empirical evidence to base my opinion on. I'm just saying.
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Old 09-11-16, 03:04 PM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by ckindt View Post
I thought you weren't supposed to put much weight on the bars. You know - a strong core to support your upper body weight with a light grip on the bars.
This design requires you to put more of your weight on the bars to be noticeable.
They have 3 spring options to presumably match with the weight your putting on the bars. Given that it's Specialized, I suspect they're tuned for the weight people actually put on the bars.

When the front end hits a bump, the handlebars move up, and so you would get a significant force, even if your hand were floating above the bars just prior to impact.
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Old 09-11-16, 03:04 PM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by Spadmike View Post
Of course I do. I at least have spent time on a suspension road bike. I at least have some empirical evidence to base my opinion on. I'm just saying.
Of course you what?

A yugo and porsche both have suspension. Therefore they must be the same. That's a dumb argument.
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Old 09-11-16, 03:05 PM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by gsa103 View Post
They have 3 spring options to presumably match with the weight your putting on the bars. Given that it's Specialized, I suspect they're tuned for the weight people actually put on the bars.

When the front end hits a bump, the handlebars move up, and so you would get a significant force, even if your hand were floating above the bars just prior to impact.
That's just totally wrong. Why doesn't anyone bother to read even a single review before posting this type of drivel?

Specialized design the front sus based upon road conditions, not rider weight.
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Old 09-11-16, 03:09 PM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by B1KE View Post
Here's the all new 2017 Specialized Roubaix. Not sure If I'm a fan of the all new cartridge suspension though...

Specialized Roubaix 2017 review - BikeRadar

Specialized Roubaix 2017 review - BikeRadar

Linked it for 'ya
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Old 09-11-16, 03:10 PM
  #67  
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Originally Posted by American Euchre View Post
Of course you what?

A yugo and porsche both have suspension. Therefore they must be the same. That's a dumb argument.
Enjoy!
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Old 09-11-16, 11:34 PM
  #68  
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Perfect timing ... I was looking to upgrade!
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Old 09-12-16, 06:19 AM
  #69  
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While I am excited to see (and read about) new developments in our sport and to the bikes, I am always a bit skeptical at most new designs, and this is no different.

The newly designed Roubaix has some interesting concepts that might make a believer out of me but I will reserve my opinion until I see (and ride) one in person.

I firmly believe that rider comfort goes hand in hand with efficiency and more miles so this design does hold my interest.
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Old 09-12-16, 08:15 AM
  #70  
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Originally Posted by badger1 View Post
Another very significant -- and positive -- change, I believe: this frame uses standard threaded b/b.

Specialized launches all-new Roubaix with front suspension | road.cc
Our long nightmare is finally over.
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Old 09-12-16, 08:26 AM
  #71  
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Originally Posted by badger1 View Post
Another very significant -- and positive -- change, I believe: this frame uses standard threaded b/b.

Specialized launches all-new Roubaix with front suspension | road.cc
I couldn't what out what standard. Do you mean the old 68mm standard or some other threaded (but wider) standard.
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Old 09-12-16, 08:28 AM
  #72  
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Originally Posted by dr_lha View Post
Our long nightmare is finally over.
Once they get ride of internal cabling (or at least offer it only an option) then the nightmare will be over. For those of us who live and ride only in the dry climate the benefits of internal cabling are minimal at best and the pain of servicing them not worth it.
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Old 09-12-16, 08:30 AM
  #73  
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Originally Posted by Inpd View Post
Once they get ride of internal cabling (or at least offer it only an option) then the nightmare will be over. For those of us who live and ride only in the dry climate the benefits of internal cabling are minimal at best and the pain of servicing them not worth it.
OK, I've never actually owned a bike with internal cabling, so I can't relate to this issue personally.

My BB30 bike is going on Craigslist today.
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Old 09-12-16, 09:34 AM
  #74  
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Originally Posted by Inpd View Post
I couldn't what out what standard. Do you mean the old 68mm standard or some other threaded (but wider) standard.
Couldn't say; here is what the review I linked said:

"One very interesting change is the switch to a traditional external threaded bottom bracket. Press-fit has lost a lot of fans over the years with customers and are manufacturers now listening? Could this be the start of the end for press-fit?"

I'm assuming, for now, that this means the new frame has a traditional 68mm threaded b/b. Picture below the quoted bit shows the bike with a standard Ultegra chainset, so I'm assuming 'normal' Shimano external b/b cups. I, for one, certainly hope so.
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Old 09-12-16, 10:19 AM
  #75  
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Originally Posted by trailangel View Post
^^ Yes. I wonder how much slop is in those suspension things.
@topslop1 I think we found your new bike! Didn't you just sell your 'dale anyway?

Slop in the stem = topslop. Couldn't be more clear.
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