Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

From century to Double Century...

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

From century to Double Century...

Old 05-21-05, 01:19 PM
  #1  
overthere
fredelicious mini-masher
Thread Starter
 
overthere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: sunny CA
Posts: 1,094

Bikes: Specialized Hybrid Specialized Dolce Elite, Specialized Ruby

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
From century to Double Century...

How do you train? Ride 12 hours a shot? Or after a certain level of fitness, can you just keep going, like an energizer bunny, if you keep fueled and hydrated?

I've done a metric century, my goal is a regular century, but I've honestly never even considered a double until I volunteered at check in for the Davis Double Century. Got home, and my bike told me it wanted to ride one too....and gave me the silent treatment with a few dirty looks.

I've only had a road bike since September, and have done 3 metric centuries, which AREN'T getting easier. At least not much. To do 200 miles...egad. The ones I checked in seemed human. A bit on the toasty side, but robust, friendly people.

How many hours a day do you spend in the saddle training for a double? How many miles a day leading up to one? How many doubles do you do a year?
__________________
Way too many hobbies...
overthere is offline  
Old 05-21-05, 02:14 PM
  #2  
velocity
Dart Board
 
velocity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Happy Valley Oregon
Posts: 1,778

Bikes: 13 Cannondale EVO Red, 2005 Cannondale Six13, 2013 SST FUJI

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
making the seat feel more comfortable is one idea and how to stay in it the other. Sadletime = pain/discomfort so figure how to make it more comfortable and decrease the time in doing so. Sometimes our periodization schedule needs to be years long and not just months depending on our age, fitness and ability. Just keep riding and finding new ways to become more comfortable in the sadle sooner or later with adjustments training time and just mental awearness you will make it.
Velocity
velocity is offline  
Old 05-21-05, 02:16 PM
  #3  
55/Rad
Form*r Ho*rd*r
 
55/Rad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 11,723

Bikes: Seven Axiom, Dave Moulton Fuso

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I did my first double last year. I had done several centuries and was at the point where I was thriving rather than just surviving. Then I did one ride at 135 miles and felt good. From there, it wasn't a big deal to jump to 206.

I found this link to be helpful. http://sportsmedicine.about.com/cs/s...blecentury.htm

55/Rad
__________________
55/Rad is offline  
Old 05-21-05, 02:55 PM
  #4  
Pjmsj21
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Eugene Oregon
Posts: 56
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
At the ripe old age of 54 I did my first double. Prior to doing the double I did about 4-5 full centuries, and one double metric. I think the double metric is a pretty good ride to evaluate if you are ready for a full double. If you feel like you could continue riding at the end of a double metric, you should be reasonably prepared to do a full double. Also a lot depends on which double you do. I did Seattle to Portland which isn't a particularly hilly double with great support.

One of the keys to completing a double is to get the proper hydration and nourishment. It was suggested to me by several long distance riders to use Hammer Products. Visit their site and try their products BEFORE you do a double.

THe other key is to ride an easily sustainable pace regardless of how other riders are riding. I took fairly frequent but short breaks, where I could stretch and naturally pee. But you really need to keep them to no more than five minutes in most instances.

Good luck ....many people complete doubles, but it just takes time and training similar to a marathon which I did as well and have to say I found more difficult than a double.

Pat Mc
Pjmsj21 is offline  
Old 05-21-05, 02:58 PM
  #5  
operator
cab horn
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Toronto
Posts: 28,349

Bikes: 1987 Bianchi Campione

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
You'll want to be doing lots of regular centuries (imperial not metric) before you even attempt to do a double.
operator is offline  
Old 05-21-05, 04:37 PM
  #6  
velocity
Dart Board
 
velocity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Happy Valley Oregon
Posts: 1,778

Bikes: 13 Cannondale EVO Red, 2005 Cannondale Six13, 2013 SST FUJI

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by 55/Rad
I did my first double last year. I had done several centuries and was at the point where I was thriving rather than just surviving. Then I did one ride at 135 miles and felt good. From there, it wasn't a big deal to jump to 206.

I found this link to be helpful. http://sportsmedicine.about.com/cs/s...blecentury.htm

55/Rad
Rad
I still can't believe that we didn't run along side each other on that RAD that was my first time doing it too. There is a watermelon ride by the Salem cycling club on the 19th of June that is a double have you done this one? they have distances of 50 100 135 and 200 I have yet to see a topical map on it.
Velocity
velocity is offline  
Old 05-21-05, 06:15 PM
  #7  
chrisesposito
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: North Bend, WA
Posts: 480

Bikes: Cervelo Soloist / Cervelo P3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The Cascade bike club here in Seattle puts on an annual 202 mile ride from Seattle to Portland every year in July; this year it's July 9. Here are their suggested training mileage schedules. The one you want is for one-day riders at the bottom of the long page.

http://www.cascade.org/EandR/stp/stp_mileage.cfm

Good luck,

Chris
chrisesposito is offline  
Old 05-21-05, 08:07 PM
  #8  
overthere
fredelicious mini-masher
Thread Starter
 
overthere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: sunny CA
Posts: 1,094

Bikes: Specialized Hybrid Specialized Dolce Elite, Specialized Ruby

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Awesome Chris. I bookmarked it.
__________________
Way too many hobbies...
overthere is offline  
Old 05-21-05, 08:43 PM
  #9  
mrballistic
Boo-ya!
 
mrballistic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Buzzing around the Portland, OR metro area.
Posts: 564

Bikes: Handbuilt steel with Ultegra10/FSA parts; a fully customized Bianchi Pista with phil hubs, carbon fork, king headset, etc. it's tough.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by velocity
Rad
I still can't believe that we didn't run along side each other on that RAD that was my first time doing it too. There is a watermelon ride by the Salem cycling club on the 19th of June that is a double have you done this one? they have distances of 50 100 135 and 200 I have yet to see a topical map on it.
Velocity
i'm planning on doing the 135 on that one... should be a blast. see you there!
mrballistic is offline  
Old 05-21-05, 09:04 PM
  #10  
zacster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Brooklyn NY
Posts: 6,083
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 10 Posts
I did the Seattle to Portland many times and I would say that I DIDN'T do centuries as training rides. In fact, to this day I've never done a single century, just doubles.

If you can do 70 miles at a comfortable but fast pace, you'll have no problem completing a double as long as you pace yourself and stop and eat, drink and have some fun.
zacster is offline  
Old 05-22-05, 01:57 AM
  #11  
overthere
fredelicious mini-masher
Thread Starter
 
overthere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: sunny CA
Posts: 1,094

Bikes: Specialized Hybrid Specialized Dolce Elite, Specialized Ruby

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Seriously?? That would be great; and do-able for me. Kinda of mulling of doing a double on my 50th birthday...
__________________
Way too many hobbies...
overthere is offline  
Old 05-22-05, 08:00 AM
  #12  
teamawe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Posts: 463
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by overthere
I've done a metric century, my goal is a regular century, but I've honestly never even considered a double until I volunteered at check in for the Davis Double Century. Got home, and my bike told me it wanted to ride one too....and gave me the silent treatment with a few dirty looks.
Thanks for working that ride. My GF and I did it yesterday and it was well supported, thanks again for helping.
teamawe is offline  
Old 05-22-05, 09:11 AM
  #13  
Stealthman_1
12 2005 DC Finishes
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Folsom, Ca
Posts: 455

Bikes: 1998 Cannondale V1000, 2001 Specialized Sirrus Pro, 2004 De Rosa King

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
First off, thanks for supporting Davis. You guys do a fantastic job and I can't tell you how much all your efforts are appreciated, Davis support is the best, bar none.
While I would agree that a strong rider who was very comfortable at 70 miles may be able to make the jump to 200 on a flat course with moderate temperatures, I wouldn't recommend it, you could be asking for a real suffer fest. I'm not trying to discourage you, exactly the opposite, as doing a double is pretty darn rewarding, but you should be prepared if you want a real shot at succeeding. There is so much more that comes into play on a double than on metrics or imperials. Regardless of how good an athlete you are a bike can become damn uncomfortable when you are talking 12-18 hours on it. Chaffing, lower back spasms, upper body fatigue, grip fatigue, wrist pain, cramping, neck soreness, and just plain all around uncomfortableness all come into play much more on doubles and while all are problems you can deal with, minimize, and/or eliminate, the only way you get experience with them is with longer rides. If metrics 'aren't getting easier', its a huge jump to doubles. I don't really believe you can effectively learn to deal with nutrition and hydration at the metric level, you're just not on the course long enough to really deplete your energy stores. When you start to suffer, it can be a real effort to eat and you must eat and their is a big difference between 'knowing' that and beind able to 'do' it. The Guida rest stop at Davis is usually littered with bodies late in the day, these are mostly people who were fit enough to finish, but just made a bad choice somewhere along the way and are toast because of it.
I agree with what has been posted earlier about gettin' to at least a double metric before attempting the double. When I rode Davis the first time, 130 with 5k climbing was the most I'd done and the transition was not bad, though I was plenty, plenty sore and desperately wanted to get in bed as soon as I was done signing in.
Hope we see you next year at Davis.
Stealthman_1 is offline  
Old 05-22-05, 11:07 AM
  #14  
The Octopus 
Senior Member
 
The Octopus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: FL
Posts: 1,099

Bikes: Dolan Forza; IRO Jamie Roy; Giant TCR Comp 1; Specialized Tri-Cross Sport; '91 Cannondale tandem; Fuji Tahoe MTB

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I did a 400K (251 miles) with 15,200 feet of climbing yesterday. Before that, the longest I'd ever gone was 161 miles, and that was on the dead-flat Ride Across Indiana. But, I'd ridden about two dozen centuries in the last year, many of them hilly and many of them in really bad weather. I think one critical thing to keep in mind when doing the ultra distances is to pay attention to food and water religiously. You'll also want to have a lot of "saddle time" in. You mileage may vary, but I don't think there's much benefit to "training" rides of more than 125 miles. Doing centures on two consecutive days also gives you a good idea of what it's like to be sore and tired on the bike and to keep riding. Do the longer rides for a good aerobic base, but make sure that you get in some quality time -- shorter rides -- in the hills and doing speed work. Anything much more than 100 miles takes a toll on you and it can take a while to recover.

Another critical aspect is to pace yourself religiously. Let the big dogs go run up front; most likely you'll catch them later in the day, and some of them will end up DNF. Especially true if the route has a lot of elevation change; force yourself to use a low gear, even though your heart wants you to mash up the suckers in the big ring. The longer the ride gets, the less finishing (and even finishing first) is about physical conditioning. Make smart decisions about how to ride, make sure to eat and drink, and minimize time spent at stops and you'll find that not only can you ride the long distances, but you'll likely finish with a great time and even will feel good at the end of it!
The Octopus is offline  
Old 05-23-05, 11:17 AM
  #15  
overthere
fredelicious mini-masher
Thread Starter
 
overthere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: sunny CA
Posts: 1,094

Bikes: Specialized Hybrid Specialized Dolce Elite, Specialized Ruby

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Okay, getting a good dose of advice and reality!! I still have problems with weak hands after a 40-50 mile ride, and saddle sore after 65. And darned if I have trouble eating on long rides. I'm good for gels, but solids, I have to force myself to choke it down, and not always successfully. I can get away with it so far, but it's not good.

You're welcome (speaking for DBC!) The members are awesome, and always try to 'do it' better every year. They have so many volunteers, when I asked if they needed more help the following day for check in, food prep, etc...the reply was 'no, we have it covered.' I don't think you'd hear that very often in other clubs sponsered rides!
__________________
Way too many hobbies...
overthere is offline  
Old 05-23-05, 11:53 AM
  #16  
OC Roadie
Out of Commission
 
OC Roadie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: SoCal
Posts: 2,272

Bikes: Felt FC, S-Works Roubaix, Epic Comp, Cyfac Proxidium

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Stealthman_1
First off, thanks for supporting Davis. You guys do a fantastic job and I can't tell you how much all your efforts are appreciated, Davis support is the best, bar none.
While I would agree that a strong rider who was very comfortable at 70 miles may be able to make the jump to 200 on a flat course with moderate temperatures, I wouldn't recommend it, you could be asking for a real suffer fest. I'm not trying to discourage you, exactly the opposite, as doing a double is pretty darn rewarding, but you should be prepared if you want a real shot at succeeding. There is so much more that comes into play on a double than on metrics or imperials. Regardless of how good an athlete you are a bike can become damn uncomfortable when you are talking 12-18 hours on it. Chaffing, lower back spasms, upper body fatigue, grip fatigue, wrist pain, cramping, neck soreness, and just plain all around uncomfortableness all come into play much more on doubles and while all are problems you can deal with, minimize, and/or eliminate, the only way you get experience with them is with longer rides. If metrics 'aren't getting easier', its a huge jump to doubles. I don't really believe you can effectively learn to deal with nutrition and hydration at the metric level, you're just not on the course long enough to really deplete your energy stores. When you start to suffer, it can be a real effort to eat and you must eat and their is a big difference between 'knowing' that and beind able to 'do' it. The Guida rest stop at Davis is usually littered with bodies late in the day, these are mostly people who were fit enough to finish, but just made a bad choice somewhere along the way and are toast because of it.
I agree with what has been posted earlier about gettin' to at least a double metric before attempting the double. When I rode Davis the first time, 130 with 5k climbing was the most I'd done and the transition was not bad, though I was plenty, plenty sore and desperately wanted to get in bed as soon as I was done signing in.
Hope we see you next year at Davis.
Hey Stealthman-
What do you suggest for a light? The Grand Tour next month will be my first double attempt and I don't have a light. I'd like to keep it to $150 or less. I've done 5 centuries so far this year including Breathless Agony and a self supported century yesterday. I'd like to get a couple 120-130 mile rides in over the next two weeks, but probably can't take that much time away from family. Do you think a few consecutive 80-110 mile Sunday rides plus my normal speed and recovery weekday rides (20-30 miles) will be enough? What kind of food & drink do you take? I normally use Powerbar "Endurance" drink, but have read that something like Spiz might be better for rides of this length as they are more of a meal replacement. Any input/suggestions are much appreciated. Thanks...Pat
OC Roadie is offline  
Old 05-23-05, 12:31 PM
  #17  
Avalanche325
Senior Member
 
Avalanche325's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Pasadena, CA
Posts: 3,162

Bikes: Litespeed Firenze / GT Avalanche

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I haven't done a double, but I have done several imperials. Just a bit of advice. On the imperials it seems like 65 miles is the point where people just start having trouble. That is where all of the little problems like shorts, jersey, of gloves rubbing start to show up. I would definately try an imperial century first.
Avalanche325 is offline  
Old 05-23-05, 01:39 PM
  #18  
Keith99
Senior Member
 
Keith99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 5,866
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Advice for the Grand Tour:

Be ready for heat. I've done it twice. The first time I have not done a century until the SFVBC 160 mile training ride two weeks earlier. I would have been fine except I got talked into doing the highland route and I do not climb well.

A year later I had a scheduling conflict, but manned a late feed station and did the staff ride a week later. I scored big time as it was 10 degrees cooler.

A couple of years later a lady in the SFVBC was going to try the 300 mile option. I was going to ride withe her for the 100 miles from Rincon to Santa Barbara and back. But that year was very hot and she was cooked by that point, just rode with her for about 20 miles going south.

Now the very good news for the Grand Tour. When you are feeling tired and out of gas. Remember that on any of the 200 mile options once you get to Rincon you will turn south and have a tailwind over 90% of the time. Even burnt out on my first ride I was able to go several miles at 25 MPH on the homeward section because of the tailwind.
Keith99 is offline  
Old 05-23-05, 04:45 PM
  #19  
OC Roadie
Out of Commission
 
OC Roadie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: SoCal
Posts: 2,272

Bikes: Felt FC, S-Works Roubaix, Epic Comp, Cyfac Proxidium

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Keith99
Advice for the Grand Tour:

Be ready for heat. I've done it twice. The first time I have not done a century until the SFVBC 160 mile training ride two weeks earlier. I would have been fine except I got talked into doing the highland route and I do not climb well.

A year later I had a scheduling conflict, but manned a late feed station and did the staff ride a week later. I scored big time as it was 10 degrees cooler.

A couple of years later a lady in the SFVBC was going to try the 300 mile option. I was going to ride withe her for the 100 miles from Rincon to Santa Barbara and back. But that year was very hot and she was cooked by that point, just rode with her for about 20 miles going south.

Now the very good news for the Grand Tour. When you are feeling tired and out of gas. Remember that on any of the 200 mile options once you get to Rincon you will turn south and have a tailwind over 90% of the time. Even burnt out on my first ride I was able to go several miles at 25 MPH on the homeward section because of the tailwind.
Thanks for the Grand Tour tips. I am trying to acclimate to hot weather riding, so my body will be ready by ride time. I did 98 miles yesterday (hottest day of the year so far), I thought I did a good job hyrdating, a day later my body is telling me I didn't. The bit about the tail winds gives me a little more hope that I can complete this. I am planning on doing the highland route, but I like to climb, or so I tell myself . My biggest fear is that my longest training ride for the double will only be around 115 miles.
OC Roadie is offline  
Old 05-23-05, 04:59 PM
  #20  
lance1ab
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Very good suggestion. I have ridden several double centuries in the last several centuries. It is really a mind game. Keep it fun. What's enjoyable in the mind is doable for the body. Keep your seat satisfied and your legs from burning out. Feel comfortable with a century and a double will feel natural. It is amazing that regardless of the ride...the last 25mi are very tiring. So...put it in your mind that your ride is 225 miles and before you know it...you are seeing the finish.

Get your legs and lungs in shape for a century. Do a couple to feel comfortable. Get a good saddle. I like the Flow mesh seat. If you can get into the sweet spot of that seat, your troubles are over regardless how long you ride. Do a double with others but don't try to ride their pace if it is too fast. Pace yourself for a long ride and spin somewhat fast but light up the hills. Always keep in mind that you need your legs to get you home.

That and my satillite radio mp3 software, and I am in the zone.
lance1ab is offline  
Old 05-23-05, 05:54 PM
  #21  
Stealthman_1
12 2005 DC Finishes
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Folsom, Ca
Posts: 455

Bikes: 1998 Cannondale V1000, 2001 Specialized Sirrus Pro, 2004 De Rosa King

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by OC Roadie
Hey Stealthman-
What do you suggest for a light? The Grand Tour next month will be my first double attempt and I don't have a light. I'd like to keep it to $150 or less. I've done 5 centuries so far this year including Breathless Agony and a self supported century yesterday. I'd like to get a couple 120-130 mile rides in over the next two weeks, but probably can't take that much time away from family. Do you think a few consecutive 80-110 mile Sunday rides plus my normal speed and recovery weekday rides (20-30 miles) will be enough? What kind of food & drink do you take? I normally use Powerbar "Endurance" drink, but have read that something like Spiz might be better for rides of this length as they are more of a meal replacement. Any input/suggestions are much appreciated. Thanks...Pat
Lighting all depends on how long you think you'll need. You'll have nearly 16 hours of legal light, if you think you can comfortably finish in less than 16 hours, anything that passes for a headlight will work, just make sure that you actually can ride by it in a pinch (I'm talking 15mph here, not 40), remember a front tire in a road crack followed by an endo is a very real risk. I have a Trek light that takes 2 c-cell batteries. The 4 AA battery lights (5 led) should meet the requirement, the Cateye Opticube is not, it is seriously dangerous to ride this light over 8 mph, especially tired. If you are going to ride any amount of time in darkness and/or have to descend you need a halogen system with at least 8 watts, Performance has a lot of this stuff on sale right now. Of course if you can afford it and plan to ride a lot after dark HID is the way.
What do I take to eat that I take with me? I have evolved to this...One camelbak mule with 100oz reservoir. 23 servings of HammerGel , 13 servings caffeinated espresso in a tiny sized water bottle that goes on my seat tube (my compact frame does not allow a full sized water bottle on seat tube), 10 servings chocolate or vanilla in Hammer flasks. One water bottle with Cytomax (sometimes frozen solid initially) or Sustain/HEED/Revenge/Whatever. I also take two Cliff Mojo bars (or regular cliffs if I don't have the Mojo bars), two individually packaged Rice Krispie treats (buy in bulk from Costco) that I eat early on while the ride is still easy, and two small Red Delicious apples. I eat the apples first, starting about a half hour into the ride, then the Rice Krispie treats. I thow gels in at regular intervals, but save the caffeinated until I'm starting to dig. On several rides I have been poorly rested and struggled with sleep on the bike, caffeinated gels pull me right back fast. At rest stops I have come to the point I won't eat more than 1/2 sandwich (1/4 to 1/2 pb and jelly Ok, meat, mayo, tomatoe, lettuce NO!), too much energy to digest, really slows me down for 30 minutes. Chow on fruits (strawberries are the best IMHO, but cold watermelon rocks, thanks DBC!), pretzels, crackers, salty Lays chips 1/2 way and beyond, any fruit and nut bars support provides (eat them on the road, don't waste time at the stop), and I will put away a cookie or two or five for filler even though I know I don't need the insulin spike. I start on the Cytomax normally about 2 hours after the start, I like water much better so I don't use the liquid fuels like some are capable of, my loss. If I start a ride with a full camelbak, packed with ice then filled with cold water I can skip the first rest stop easy (unless must check in) and sometimes the 2nd stop too. The weight of a full camelbak slows you down a lot less than screwing around taking it off, waiting to fill, and screwing around to get it back on. I will eat one Cliff bar about an hour before lunch, don't want to ride into lunch hungry, and save the 2nd one for emergency use. That's what I do YMMV Greatly!

Last edited by Stealthman_1; 05-23-05 at 06:00 PM.
Stealthman_1 is offline  
Old 05-23-05, 08:05 PM
  #22  
OC Roadie
Out of Commission
 
OC Roadie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: SoCal
Posts: 2,272

Bikes: Felt FC, S-Works Roubaix, Epic Comp, Cyfac Proxidium

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks Stealthman-
The light I've been considering is the Niterider Digiital Evolution. It's a 10 watt single beam halogen light with rechargeable battery pack. Supergo has it for $110 eBay probably has it cheaper, they make the same light in a 15 watt version with a charge gauge for about $50 more. I really plan to use this mostly for doubles (3-6 times per year, if all goes well), and for eearly morning training in the fall and winter when it's dark at 6:00am. Do you think the extra 5 watts are that noticeable?
I've been debating over using a camelbak for a while now. I really would prefer not to, but at the same time it makes sense to help carry the neccesities of a 13 hour ride. Are the stops usually spaced close enough if I choose to just bring 2 water bottles? I agree totally with your ride foods. At sag stops I keep to PB&J, fruit and Fig Newtons. My pockets are stuffed with Cliff Bars, a flask of Carb Boom, a couple of Carb Boom packs with caffeine and Fig Newtons. Yesterday on a long ride I found Pop Tarts at a gas station, and I must say they worked very well (over 300 calories with 70 grams of carbs, about 50%sugar carbs). I will probably just stick with the drink and food that I've been training with for the last year or so and just bring and eat more of it. I like the espresso idea and will experiment with that in the next couple of weeks. I can never sleep well the night before big rides and will probably have to leave the house around 3:30am, anything to keep me awake and alert will help. Anyhow, thanks for the help, you the DC king of this forum IMO
OC Roadie is offline  
Old 05-23-05, 09:59 PM
  #23  
Stealthman_1
12 2005 DC Finishes
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Folsom, Ca
Posts: 455

Bikes: 1998 Cannondale V1000, 2001 Specialized Sirrus Pro, 2004 De Rosa King

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I don't think the extra 5 watts are that noticeable from 10 to 15 watts, 10 to 40 watt HID equivalent is noticeable. The 15 watt system has one big advantage, variable power levels. At 3 watt you can still get home (slowly) and have 5 hours of run time. If you decide you like to double and you do the harder ones, some of which come in April/early May, and you are not a super stud (as I'm not ) you will need either a second battery or more run time. Don't fret a 2nd battery, plenty of people carry them. Lots of times we'll SAG the 2nd battery to the last rest stop and keep the lights all day.

On Grand Tour you should have no problem with support and two water bottles, many people can do it on even the hardest rides (that would not include me!). Advantage does go to camelbak for its insulating properties, though Polar bottles will make that advantage slim. While I haven't ridden Grand Tour (but I still may, depends on my recovery), I've heard support is excellent. On other rides it is not at that level, some rides take pride in your ability to endure, I'll take two extra hours of cold water on those rides, 80 degree water on a 95 degree day sucks for me.
Some words of caution...This year we have had two waterproof HID headlights die from water poisoning (Butterfield), one HID bulb just burn out (Solvang), taillights die (Death Valley), power cable short (Butterfield), rear derailer come apart (brand new Campy Courus) (Butterfield), accesory bar fail (the kind you mount comps and lights on shaped CF bars) (Davis), one inch tire slash on still unknown invisible object (Mulholland), a lot-o-flat-tires (actually only Mulholland for me, my ride partner not so lucky), more than minor FD adjustments neccesary (Devil, Central Coast), forgotten chamois cream (Davis), and god knows what else...If you can live with DNFing or can't stand (or afford the time) to wait around for SAG (not ripping on them, just sometimes you ain't where they are) because of something simple (and plenty people can) go light, if not, pack right. Bar end tail lights for emergency use, a Cateye Opticube or equivalent (I think the Sefras light is cheaper) for three reasons, you can work on your bike after dark with it and not waste valuable big light time, you can mount it on your helmet and see your route sheet/bike computer, if your main light dies you can find a buddy to light your way (ride behind him, if you ride in front you will be able to see everything except whats right in front of you ) and the Cateye keeps you legal in the organizers eyes. You need a tire boot, preferably a two to three inch chunk of used rubber you can boot a slash with if you can't get a SAG tire, I rode 140 miles at Mulholland this way. Get a package of the Butt Butr individual packets and carry two of them with you, big climbs late in the day are much more comfortable with a fresh gooping. Either have 8+ inches of velcro lashing or a foot or so of duct tape...sooner or later it will come in handy big time, just how is a mystery till it happens .

Pop Tarts work pretty well for me for breakfast, also, dare I say it here...oatmeal . Any ride put on by Planet Ultra will have HammerGel so I back off on what I personally bring, let them support me, but I always have an emergency flask in case they run out, etc.
If I'm the king, I hope the world doesn't mind a plodding king...

Last edited by Stealthman_1; 05-23-05 at 10:07 PM.
Stealthman_1 is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Dfrost
Classic and Vintage Sales
5
10-27-16 02:46 PM
tjkoko
Bicycle Mechanics
5
07-14-15 11:37 AM
windhchaser
Foo
0
04-03-15 07:50 PM
Mysterious Lady
Hybrid Bicycles
8
06-30-11 03:10 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.