Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Moving To France: Bring bike or buy there?

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Moving To France: Bring bike or buy there?

Old 01-24-17, 12:39 PM
  #1  
Hmmm
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Hmmm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Paris, France
Posts: 398

Bikes: TCX & CAAD3 SAECO

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 145 Post(s)
Liked 107 Times in 65 Posts
Moving To France: Bring bike or buy there?

I'm moving to France to stay for a year. I can't decide if purchasing a bike case (a friends Thule RoundTrip for $200) and flying it over on Delta, or purchasing a bike there and then selling it when it comes time to move back home. Does anyone have any experience or thoughts on this?

I have a CAAD10 with 105 and I would be happy with anything comparable.

Also I would appreciate tips on finding a good group to ride with in Nice and Paris.
Hmmm is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 01:25 PM
  #2  
Ajkollme
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Hartford, CT
Posts: 152

Bikes: SuperSix, Nature Boy, Mattioli R1, Burley Tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I don't have experience bringing or buying a bike overseas, but I do have experience with extended stays overseas.


With the chaos of trying to figure out a new city and a new job, buying a new bike where there may be a language barrier may be a larger burden than you anticipate. Having a bike that already fits and that you are comfortable with will be the easier, more comfortable option.


On the other hand, going to buy a new bike means you may have access to brands that are harder to find here in the US. Also, in the process of finding the new bike you will likely meet other people who like to ride, who may give you good route info and possibly be a new riding partner. To me, this sounds like the more fun option that follows the spirit of moving overseas, but it is dependent on you putting in a little extra effort.


Where in France will you be living?
Ajkollme is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 01:42 PM
  #3  
tyrion
Senior Member
 
tyrion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 3,786

Bikes: Velo Orange Piolet

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2035 Post(s)
Liked 1,582 Times in 771 Posts
Buying a new bike in the new place sounds like a good way to get to know the local culture. At least the bike culture. I'd get something French, not a clone of what you already have, something you could bring back home and it would be "exotic".
tyrion is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 01:48 PM
  #4  
redfooj
pluralis majestatis
 
redfooj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: you rope
Posts: 4,206

Bikes: a DuhRosa

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 537 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
There's no burden to buying a bike. It's not a car - with registration, insurance, upkeep. It's a simple commodity no different from buying a blender whether new from the shop or used.

Consider your new housing size will be limited. Where will you keep the case? Besides shipping the bike over you're probably gonna want to ship personal belongings, too.

Unless you're 5'2" or 6'8" with a handmade bike, just get a new one.
redfooj is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 02:01 PM
  #5  
VNA
Senior Member
 
VNA's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 870
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 74 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
If you speak french you can go to: Vélo 101 le site officiel du vélo - cyclisme vtt cyclosport cyclo-cross You will find plenty at the local level.

Used to take my bike in a case, but it is now so expensive--it used to be free on some airlines--can you imagine that? I may use a BikeFriday, the case is much smaller for this year's trip.
Also you have to make it fit in a car/taxi or the train?

If you are not use to ride in big town, get a feel by riding in the country side before, city traffic is very busy and can be intimidating particularly in Paris and all along the coast and even more in summer--it is gridlocked actually.
Personally for a year I would take my own bike.

Bon voyage.
VNA is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 02:05 PM
  #6  
ridelikeaturtle
Senior Member
 
ridelikeaturtle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 1,222

Bikes: Bianchi Ti Megatube; Colnago Competition; Planet-X EC-130E; Klein Pulse; Amp Research B4; Litespeed Catalyst; Fondriest Squadra Corse; Trek Y11

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 578 Post(s)
Liked 402 Times in 235 Posts
What part of France? I'd suggest leboncoin.fr , put in your region and search in the "velos" section, there are loads.
ridelikeaturtle is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 02:09 PM
  #7  
Ajkollme
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Hartford, CT
Posts: 152

Bikes: SuperSix, Nature Boy, Mattioli R1, Burley Tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by redfooj View Post
There's no burden to buying a bike. It's not a car - with registration, insurance, upkeep. It's a simple commodity no different from buying a blender whether new from the shop or used.


My point was not that the bicycle itself would be the burden. The burden I referred to is getting yourself settled with life basics in a new country. When moving to a new country the OP will have the challenge of trying to navigate a new city, find out where to buy food, how to use a new transportation system, get his utilities hooked up, and if he is working will likely have a crazy first few weeks on the job. Additionally, OP may be in a rural area without a bike shop, which would require traveling to another unknown city to get the bike.
Ajkollme is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 02:19 PM
  #8  
redfooj
pluralis majestatis
 
redfooj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: you rope
Posts: 4,206

Bikes: a DuhRosa

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 537 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Ajkollme View Post
My point was not that the bicycle itself would be the burden. The burden I referred to is getting yourself settled with life basics in a new country. When moving to a new country the OP will have the challenge of trying to navigate a new city, find out where to buy food, how to use a new transportation system, get his utilities hooked up, and if he is working will likely have a crazy first few weeks on the job.
None of that is impacted by taking out half a day to buy a bike.

Or, rather, there is no realpotential riding time lost by not having already having a bike.
redfooj is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 02:21 PM
  #9  
Ajkollme
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Hartford, CT
Posts: 152

Bikes: SuperSix, Nature Boy, Mattioli R1, Burley Tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by redfooj View Post
None of that is impacted by taking out half a day to buy a bike.

Or, rather, there is no realpotential riding time lost by not having already having a bike.
That is a nice opinion, mine is different.


Edit: Just to clarify, I don't think the OP hasn't provided enough info about himself or where he will be living to say that there is no riding time lost by not bringing his bike.


In one scenario, OP could be living in a rural town with no car, no bike shop, speaks no French, and has social anxiety that he manages by going for long rides on his bike - in this scenario, I think there is a significant burden to buying a bike.


In another scenario, OP could speak fluent French and be renting the apartment above a bike shop - in this scenario, there is no significant burden to buying a bike.

Last edited by Ajkollme; 01-24-17 at 02:42 PM.
Ajkollme is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 02:33 PM
  #10  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 4,140
Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1906 Post(s)
Liked 1,170 Times in 568 Posts
Bring your bike to France, and buy a bike. When you return, fly both bikes home. And then buy a third bike.
HTupolev is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 02:39 PM
  #11  
Nachoman
well hello there
 
Nachoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Point Loma, CA
Posts: 15,365

Bikes: Bill Holland (Road-Ti), Fuji Roubaix Pro (back-up), Bike Friday (folder), Co-Motion (tandem) & Trek 750 (hybrid)

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 488 Post(s)
Liked 271 Times in 172 Posts
Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
Bring your bike to France, and buy a bike. When you return, fly both bikes home. And then buy a third bike.
__________________
.
.

Two wheels good. Four wheels bad.
Nachoman is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 02:41 PM
  #12  
redfooj
pluralis majestatis
 
redfooj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: you rope
Posts: 4,206

Bikes: a DuhRosa

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 537 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Ajkollme View Post
That is a nice opinion, mine is different.
I've moved overseas 4 times.

He may have to take a train to a bike shop? Like as is normal daily life for many many people to buy normal goods?

The guy has a road bike. Presumably he's not overwhelmed by what is hybrid vs fitness vs endurance vs trail bikes. And he knows how a brifter works. And what a 53/39 chainset means.

The dollar is at a tremendous position relative to the Euro. He has easier access to Lapierre. And Canyon and Rose by internet order. (Trek and Cannondale and Specialized and Cervelo are still distributed worldwide). And an opportunity to get N+1 with a current-generation drivetrain.

Easy decision.

What should be brought over are compact, basic tools. No point in buying a duplicate cassette tool, torque wrench, chain remover, etc
redfooj is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 03:43 PM
  #13  
sced
South Carolina Ed
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Greer, SC
Posts: 3,789

Bikes: Holdsworth custom, Macario Pro, Ciocc San Cristobal, Viner Nemo, Cyfac Le Mythique, Giant TCR, Tommasso Mondial, Cyfac Etoile

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 305 Post(s)
Liked 196 Times in 98 Posts
Going to France is its own reward, such a beautiful country. Any questions about bicycles is insignificant in the overall picture. Have a great time.


Really, buy a used bike over there and sell it if you don't want to bring it home. Shopping will be fun as the French know a thing or two about cycling.
sced is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 03:51 PM
  #14  
Hmmm
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Hmmm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Paris, France
Posts: 398

Bikes: TCX & CAAD3 SAECO

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 145 Post(s)
Liked 107 Times in 65 Posts
Sorry guys. For more detail I will be in Nice, close to the center of town for the first 5 months then up to Paris.

Thanks for all the suggestions, I would be buying there to save costs then selling before coming home. Since the case + air fees both ways would be $500.. so as long as I can get out of the used bike for less than that I would consider it worth it.

I'll check the sites listed! And anymore comments are appreciated!

Also, yes I can handle myself in city traffic

And oui, je parle un peu Français.

Last edited by Hmmm; 01-24-17 at 03:54 PM. Reason: Addition
Hmmm is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 03:53 PM
  #15  
sced
South Carolina Ed
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Greer, SC
Posts: 3,789

Bikes: Holdsworth custom, Macario Pro, Ciocc San Cristobal, Viner Nemo, Cyfac Le Mythique, Giant TCR, Tommasso Mondial, Cyfac Etoile

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 305 Post(s)
Liked 196 Times in 98 Posts
Nice is like hitting the jackpot!

Colnago Dream Campagnolo Record | eBay
sced is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 04:10 PM
  #16  
thenewjs
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 63
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
I moved from Texas to DC and hated I sold my bike before I left....Until I purchased a way better bike than I perviously had (Scott Speedster 50 to CAAD12 Ultegra).

If your just going to get a comparable bike, I would suggest taking the one you have.
thenewjs is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 07:41 PM
  #17  
ridelikeaturtle
Senior Member
 
ridelikeaturtle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 1,222

Bikes: Bianchi Ti Megatube; Colnago Competition; Planet-X EC-130E; Klein Pulse; Amp Research B4; Litespeed Catalyst; Fondriest Squadra Corse; Trek Y11

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 578 Post(s)
Liked 402 Times in 235 Posts
If you know you're only there for a limited time, and will be returning, just buy a cheap beater when you arrive, and you won't worry about it being kicked, nicked, and left out in the rain.
ridelikeaturtle is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 07:49 PM
  #18  
Darth Steele
Senior Member
 
Darth Steele's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 493

Bikes: 2013 SuperSix Ultegra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
why not become a gigalo (sp?) and let some French chick buy you a road bike and an all white FDJ kit? dura ace no less
Darth Steele is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 08:15 PM
  #19  
San Pedro
Senior Member
 
San Pedro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Kota, Aichi, Japan
Posts: 1,277

Bikes: 2011 Giant Seek R3, 2015 Specialized Allez Elite, 2017 Giant TCR Advanced 2

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 344 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
You could always bring your bike, and then sell it when you leave. Once you go back then you can buy a new one.
San Pedro is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 08:29 PM
  #20  
jon c. 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 4,271
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1236 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 493 Times in 273 Posts
I'd buy one there just for the fun of getting something a bit different.
jon c. is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 09:32 PM
  #21  
look566 rider
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 713

Bikes: Waterford R33, 2019 Infinito, Gunnar Roadie, 1999 Colnago Tecnos, '04 Cannondale Optimo 800 & '51 Rudge Sports, Colnago Tecnos, Tom Kellogg Merlin..

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Liked 93 Times in 33 Posts
My son's experience going tp Warsaw for summer college credits was he bought a very nice used steel Basso with full Campy for about half what the same bike would have cost here. He then had a bike shop pack it up in a bike box and shipped it home. Still has in his stable. Still rides it a bit.
look566 rider is offline  
Old 01-24-17, 09:46 PM
  #22  
sbxx1985 
Senior Member
 
sbxx1985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Colorado
Posts: 12,942
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1934 Post(s)
Liked 282 Times in 158 Posts
Buy it there. No brainer.
sbxx1985 is offline  
Old 01-25-17, 08:58 AM
  #23  
Capo72
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 164

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix SL4 Disc SRAM eTap

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Buy a new bike in France. Something great that you can't get here. Like someone said before, the dollar is strong. When you come back to the US, disassemble the bike, pack it in a box and UPS it home. Then you don't have to deal with travel bags and airlines.
Capo72 is offline  
Old 01-25-17, 10:31 AM
  #24  
Doge
Senior Member
 
Doge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Southern California, USA
Posts: 10,407

Bikes: 1979 Raleigh Team 753

Mentioned: 153 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3345 Post(s)
Liked 347 Times in 239 Posts
Originally Posted by Hmmm View Post
I'm moving to France to stay for a year. I can't decide if purchasing a bike case (a friends Thule RoundTrip for $200) and flying it over on Delta, or purchasing a bike there and then selling it when it comes time to move back home. Does anyone have any experience or thoughts on this?

I have a CAAD10 with 105 and I would be happy with anything comparable.

Also I would appreciate tips on finding a good group to ride with in Nice and Paris.
I think traveling with bikes is a pain and have a lot of racing bike traveling experience. When it came to just riding and training - we rented.

You can normally rent pretty nice Shimano 105 level bikes in most of Europe. We rented in Italy and Spain. My son used his in France. When you buy there you pay VAT. When you buy outside the EU some sites (starbike) will give you a 19% VAT discount.

Last edited by Doge; 01-25-17 at 01:47 PM.
Doge is offline  
Old 01-25-17, 11:03 AM
  #25  
hsuehhwa
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Huntington Harbor, CA
Posts: 399
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 115 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
The decision is very personal. Are you very a very experienced rider that can quickly adapts to different bike fits? Do you need perfect bike fits (your current) in order to ride comfortably? How much upgrade how you done to your CAAD 10?


Unless your have a very strong personal bond with your CAAD10, from a pure economic perspective, it's probably not worth it to transport it abroad. In addition, CAAD10 105 in general has a very good resale value here in US.
hsuehhwa is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.