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Any endurance road bikes with fender and rack mounts?

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Any endurance road bikes with fender and rack mounts?

Old 07-02-17, 06:10 AM
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Any endurance road bikes with fender and rack mounts?

At some point I might want to upgrade my Trek Crossrip to something better (ligher & better components). However, because I use the Trek as a commuter bike, I'd want to keep the ability to mount fenders and panniers. I don't need heavy load capacity for touring, just the ability to carry up to 10kg or so of clothes, lunch, laptop etc.

I know quite a few endurance road bikes have fender eyelets / braze-ons, but I'm not aware of any that can fit a normal rack (I have a Topeak rack system on my Trek, which is very sturdy).

Do any of the popular mainstream endurance manufacturers (Trek, Specialized, Giant, Cannondale, GT, Fuji etc.) have bikes with this capability?

Thanks!

John
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Old 07-02-17, 06:40 AM
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Lynskey Sportive

Will take a fender and a rack. Titanium.
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Old 07-02-17, 06:47 AM
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For a commuter, you can save yourself some money and just buy a used steel roadbike with eyelets. They make fine commuters and the price is certainly right.
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Old 07-02-17, 07:41 AM
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You might be able to use a large saddle bag, like an Appidura to do your commuting with.
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Old 07-02-17, 08:25 AM
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Why are you concerned about getting a lighter bike when you're carrying a 10kg load? What's wrong with your current components? "Better" is measured by whether or not the bike better meets your needs.

Ultralight and cargo don't go hand-in-hand. Carbon frames are not going to handle a heavy load fixed to the tubing (even 5kg is a "heavy" load to attach to the middle of carbon forks / seat stays). Also Carbon forks will not offer steering geometry that will accommodate a front-load if you want to use a front rack. The best option for cargo is a steel-frame touring bike, which are not light. "Endurance" comfort comes from 40+ mm tires.

Of course there's no reason why you need a touring bike or even racks for commuting. You could always get an ultra-light racing bike, throw on a backpack, and call it a day.
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Old 07-02-17, 08:27 AM
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Old 07-02-17, 08:34 AM
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Originally Posted by rgconner
Get something different, get something awesome:


Monster Cross Frames - Black Mountain Cycles
That's a great price for a frame like that. First I've heard of Black Mountain Cycles, thanks for linking
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Old 07-02-17, 10:05 AM
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For a do-a-lot bike, I'd look at the Jamis Renegade series.
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Old 07-02-17, 05:20 PM
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I have gone down the same road as you. Two bikes is the answer. As mentioned above, fenders and racks will just weigh a road endurance bike down.

That, and the cross rip isn't a bad commuter - far from it. True, I rode a metric century on mine rackless with some tough commuter tires and the original Sora group, and it was as fast as I was. But a rack, even a light one, you notice - putting it on and taking it off is annoying. And I'd never want to put a nice group on it if it is really a commuter, which means rain and being locked up outside, etc.

I have a Domane now for road rides/events, and the crossrip stays in commuter mode.

If for some reason you are stuck with one bike (e.g. space) that must do both commuter and road race duty, the crossrip is about as good a choice as anything else similar in price. I've gone back and forth with mine, but the frame isn't that bad once fit is dialed in and some of the crappier bearings (headset, bb) are replaced. I figure a used stock crossrip would sell for $600-800 of you're lucky, and a new "nicer" endurance bike would cost about what a pure endurance bike would.

Edited for drunk ipad gibberish.

Last edited by ph0rk; 07-02-17 at 07:55 PM.
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Old 07-02-17, 05:50 PM
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Originally Posted by johngwheeler
Any endurance road bikes with fender and rack mounts?
New endurance geo AL bike from Specialized w/fender & rack mounts in an affordable package - I'd totally buy one as a commuter/rando bike:

Specialized Allez revamped for 2018 - lighter frame, new carbon fork and mudguard mounts | road.cc

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/me...z-elite/133817
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Old 07-02-17, 06:08 PM
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Perhaps the spec is more adventure bike (flared drops, 30c tires, thru-axle fork, hydro disc), but the Breezer Inversion has rack and fender mounts.

Breezer Bikes - Inversion Team - Bike Overview
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Old 07-02-17, 06:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Succhia Ruota
New endurance geo AL bike from Specialized w/fender & rack mounts in an affordable package - I'd totally buy one as a commuter/rando bike:

Specialized Allez revamped for 2018 - lighter frame, new carbon fork and mudguard mounts | road.cc

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/me...z-elite/133817
I would want discs on a commuter
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Old 07-02-17, 07:38 PM
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I use my Cannondale Synapse for club and solo weekend rides as well as commuting with this quickly- and easily-removable rack. It attaches to the seat rails and is carbon seatpost friendly. It's lightweight and sturdy. I attached a very lightweight plastic basket to it with zip ties. I place my belongings in a lightweight nylon backpack which I place in the basket and secure with a bungee net. Works great. Rack goes on for commuting, gets removed in seconds for non-commuting rides - best of both worlds.

https://www.arkel-od.com/en/arkel-randonneur-rack.html
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Old 07-02-17, 07:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Sy Reene
For a do-a-lot bike, I'd look at the Jamis Renegade series.
renegadeseries
I agree. Renegade is an great bike. The Elite has an amazing parts mix.

OP should look at a Niner RLT 9 as well. Steel or aluminum. -Tim-
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Old 07-02-17, 09:44 PM
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Originally Posted by bikemig
For a commuter, you can save yourself some money and just buy a used steel roadbike with eyelets. They make fine commuters and the price is certainly right.
I am actually trying (perhaps impossibly) to find a light-weight (probably carbon) bike that can also handle commuting duties if necessary. If I had to choose, I would keep my Trek for commuting duties and simply get a new road bike, but space & wife's patience with my obsession may be stretched!

Originally Posted by San Pedro
You might be able to use a large saddle bag, like an Appidura to do your commuting with.
I actually have an Apidura and it's quite useful for carrying extra clothes / food etc., but not suitable for laptop or carrying an A4-sized file.

Originally Posted by FordTrax
Will take a fender and a rack. Titanium.
The Lynskey Sportive is very nice! Pricey though....

Originally Posted by Sy Reene
For a do-a-lot bike, I'd look at the Jamis Renegade series.
renegadeseries
I love the look of the James Renegade and it would probably be the top of list for a gravel bike that could maybe hold its own a road endurance bike.

I'm still trying to decide if what I need / want is a light-weight gravel bike or a dedicated road endurance bike. The endurance bike might be a bit lighter and better for climbing, but offers less flexibility.

I wonder if many people ride long sportives with a gravel bike (with road tires)?
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Old 07-02-17, 10:04 PM
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Originally Posted by howheels
Why are you concerned about getting a lighter bike when you're carrying a 10kg load? What's wrong with your current components? "Better" is measured by whether or not the bike better meets your needs.

Ultralight and cargo don't go hand-in-hand. Carbon frames are not going to handle a heavy load fixed to the tubing (even 5kg is a "heavy" load to attach to the middle of carbon forks / seat stays). Also Carbon forks will not offer steering geometry that will accommodate a front-load if you want to use a front rack. The best option for cargo is a steel-frame touring bike, which are not light. "Endurance" comfort comes from 40+ mm tires.

Of course there's no reason why you need a touring bike or even racks for commuting. You could always get an ultra-light racing bike, throw on a backpack, and call it a day.
You make some good points. I currently have two bikes for the purposes that I'm discussing: the Trek Crossrip is the workhorse (somewhat heavy and unresponsive, and a bit rough, but carries my stuff OK). My Giant CX bike is my "road bike" with 32mm semi-slicks and a wheel set for wider CX/gravel tires).

If I replace the Trek with an endurance bike, it sounds like I'd lose my commuting load capacity, and potentially subject a light-weight bike to more regular punishment than it deserves.


Originally Posted by ph0rk
I have gone down the same road as you. Two bikes is the answer. As mentioned above, fenders and racks will just weigh a road endurance bike down.

That, and the cross rip isn't a bad commuter - far from it. True, I rode a metric century on mine rackless with some tough commuter tires and the original Sora group, and it was as fast as I was. But a rack, even a light one, you notice - putting it on and taking it off is annoying. And I'd never want to put a nice group on it if it is really a commuter, which means rain and being locked up outside, etc.

I have a Domane now for road rides/events, and the crossrip stays in commuter mode.

If for some reason you are stuck with one bike (e.g. space) that must do both commuter and road race duty, the crossrip is about as good a choice as anything else similar in price. I've gone back and forth with mine, but the frame isn't that bad once fit is dialed in and some of the crappier bearings (headset, bb) are replaced. I figure a used stock crossrip would sell for $600-800 of you're lucky, and a new "nicer" endurance bike would cost about what a pure endurance bike would.

Edited for drunk ipad gibberish.
Agreed. This is why I ended up getting a second bike - I didn't want to do my weekend rides on a bike weighed down with commuting gear (rack, kick-stand, heavy duty lights), and taking these off every weekend was too much effort. My Crossrip weighs over 13kg with an empty pannier now.

If I have to limit myself to 2 bikes, maybe I should be looking at replacing my Giant TCX with something more road-oriented. I'd tend to go down the carbon gravel-bike route to do double duty as an endurance road bike (with suitable tires) and a gravel bike with fatter tyres.

Hmm, compromises! there's a reason for N+1; I just don't think my wife would see it that way.....
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Old 07-02-17, 10:05 PM
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Trek Domane has rack & fender capability.
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Old 07-03-17, 06:35 AM
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Originally Posted by howheels
Why are you concerned about getting a lighter bike when you're carrying a 10kg load? What's wrong with your current components? "Better" is measured by whether or not the bike better meets your needs.
In my case, I made the decision to build a lightweight commuter because I wouldn't always be carrying a 'heavy' load. If you build it light enough, your commuter can also be your fast road ride, especially if you bother to pull off the fenders, rack, and lights.

Originally Posted by howheels
Ultralight and cargo don't go hand-in-hand. Carbon frames are not going to handle a heavy load fixed to the tubing (even 5kg is a "heavy" load to attach to the middle of carbon forks / seat stays). Also Carbon forks will not offer steering geometry that will accommodate a front-load if you want to use a front rack. The best option for cargo is a steel-frame touring bike, which are not light. "Endurance" comfort comes from 40+ mm tires.
Do you have experience with 'heavy loads' and carbon frames or is this conjecture? My Pedal Force CX1 frame handled nearly 25,000 commuting miles with a ~5 kg rear rack load most days and up to 15 kg. Now it mostly tows around a ~90 lb. Burley trailer with my son and his bike. Again, no issues.

Originally Posted by howheels
Of course there's no reason why you need a touring bike or even racks for commuting. You could always get an ultra-light racing bike, throw on a backpack, and call it a day.
I've tried commuting with a backpack and absolutely hated it. Heavy traffic and something that obstructs my rear view doesn't work for me. Perhaps for a shorter ride but my commute was 30 miles r/t and I wanted my two hours a day on the bike to be as pleasant as possible.

Pedal Force CX1 at just under 24 lbs. (10.8 kg) as shown:

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Old 07-03-17, 07:23 AM
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Originally Posted by gsa103
Trek Domane has rack & fender capability.
Older versions, the newer models don't have rack eyelets anymore. They do still have hidden fender mounts.


Originally Posted by johngwheeler
You make some good points. I currently have two bikes for the purposes that I'm discussing: the Trek Crossrip is the workhorse (somewhat heavy and unresponsive, and a bit rough, but carries my stuff OK). My Giant CX bike is my "road bike" with 32mm semi-slicks and a wheel set for wider CX/gravel tires).

If I replace the Trek with an endurance bike, it sounds like I'd lose my commuting load capacity, and potentially subject a light-weight bike to more regular punishment than it deserves.




Agreed. This is why I ended up getting a second bike - I didn't want to do my weekend rides on a bike weighed down with commuting gear (rack, kick-stand, heavy duty lights), and taking these off every weekend was too much effort. My Crossrip weighs over 13kg with an empty pannier now.

If I have to limit myself to 2 bikes, maybe I should be looking at replacing my Giant TCX with something more road-oriented. I'd tend to go down the carbon gravel-bike route to do double duty as an endurance road bike (with suitable tires) and a gravel bike with fatter tyres.

Hmm, compromises! there's a reason for N+1; I just don't think my wife would see it that way.....
I think if you really want to do some gnarly gravel and long road rides and CX, you can talk yourself into a bike for each.

Most of the bikes mentioned in the thread will feel heavier than your average pure road endurance bike (because they're more adventure bikes). I also think you're probably going to end up with an alloy or steel bike if you want rack eyelets. There are a few exceptions, but generally you'll end up with a bike very much like your crossrip if you want one bike to cover all three things.

To be honest, other than saving me the faff of stripping the commuting stuff from my crossrip, the Domane doesn't really get me much - it is a little more upright, so fitting was more simple, but once that's squared away all I really get with the Domane is a bike that is a few pounds lighter (and, I guess, slightly more narrow tires, but a spare wheelset could get that done). I can also roll with 38c tires on the crossrip without worrying about fast paced group rides (though I still think my fitness was a larger factor than my tires). FWIW, the crossrip with Paselas makes for a pretty good gravel bike. My last few gravel rides before I moved I rode it, complete with a rear rack and trunk, and it was fine. The Hy/Rds on the crossrip feel about as good as the tiagra full hydro system on the Domane.

I have my Domane set up with tubeless gravel slicks right now, sort of thinking of a bike to split the difference between a Warbird and a road bike (not seeking gravel, but not afraid of it), and it is working well so far. No clue if I'll bork the frame riding it like a gravel bike at times - Trek certainly seems to market it that way!

I think if you go for another bike that splits the difference between two or more categories, you'll end up in the same place you are now.
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Old 07-03-17, 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by johngwheeler
You make some good points. I currently have two bikes for the purposes that I'm discussing: the Trek Crossrip is the workhorse (somewhat heavy and unresponsive, and a bit rough, but carries my stuff OK). My Giant CX bike is my "road bike" with 32mm semi-slicks and a wheel set for wider CX/gravel tires).

If I replace the Trek with an endurance bike, it sounds like I'd lose my commuting load capacity, and potentially subject a light-weight bike to more regular punishment than it deserves.

Agreed. This is why I ended up getting a second bike - I didn't want to do my weekend rides on a bike weighed down with commuting gear (rack, kick-stand, heavy duty lights), and taking these off every weekend was too much effort. My Crossrip weighs over 13kg with an empty pannier now.

If I have to limit myself to 2 bikes, maybe I should be looking at replacing my Giant TCX with something more road-oriented. I'd tend to go down the carbon gravel-bike route to do double duty as an endurance road bike (with suitable tires) and a gravel bike with fatter tyres.

Hmm, compromises! there's a reason for N+1; I just don't think my wife would see it that way.....
It's hard to sort out what you're thinking about in all of this, because on the one hand you want a new and better commuter, then you say you'd ideally keep the Crossrip and get a better roadie but can't, then it turns out you do have a second bike as a roadie with 32c semi-slicks, yet worry that a gravel bike isn't suited for sportives...it's kind of confusing as to what your priorities are. Maybe you're thinking to sell both to fund a new and better single bike?

In any case, I'd suggest you look at geometry rather than general bike type categories. My thinking here is that the right and sporty geometry will feel fun to ride, irrespective of how the bike is categorized.

I'd think a bike like a Domane AL with 28c tires would be a lot more fun to road-ride on, even with a rack, than your TCX; shorter stays, shorter wheelbase, less trail...it can all add up to a more responsive ride. Lighter, too. And given it's the Crossrip you're most disappointed in, looking at the geometry, you can see it's more "slacked out" than the TCX, so you can see why it might be less fun-feeling to ride.
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Old 07-03-17, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by ph0rk
Older versions, the newer models don't have rack eyelets anymore. They do still have hidden fender mounts.
There is a new '18 Domane model AL which does: https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/b...olorCode=black
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Old 07-03-17, 08:55 AM
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Valence Disc A 105 RS505 - Endurance - Bikes - Norco Bicycles
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Old 07-03-17, 11:33 AM
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Purpose-built commuter bikes are heavier than a road bike and have rack and fender mounts. They all take wider tires.

My adventure bike has rack and fender mounts and takes 35 c tires. Its my all-round commuter bike and load hauler.

A road bike isn't built with carrying loads in mind.
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Old 07-03-17, 06:17 PM
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Originally Posted by ph0rk
Older versions, the newer models don't have rack eyelets anymore. They do still have hidden fender mounts.




I think if you really want to do some gnarly gravel and long road rides and CX, you can talk yourself into a bike for each.

Most of the bikes mentioned in the thread will feel heavier than your average pure road endurance bike (because they're more adventure bikes). I also think you're probably going to end up with an alloy or steel bike if you want rack eyelets. There are a few exceptions, but generally you'll end up with a bike very much like your crossrip if you want one bike to cover all three things.

To be honest, other than saving me the faff of stripping the commuting stuff from my crossrip, the Domane doesn't really get me much - it is a little more upright, so fitting was more simple, but once that's squared away all I really get with the Domane is a bike that is a few pounds lighter (and, I guess, slightly more narrow tires, but a spare wheelset could get that done). I can also roll with 38c tires on the crossrip without worrying about fast paced group rides (though I still think my fitness was a larger factor than my tires). FWIW, the crossrip with Paselas makes for a pretty good gravel bike. My last few gravel rides before I moved I rode it, complete with a rear rack and trunk, and it was fine. The Hy/Rds on the crossrip feel about as good as the tiagra full hydro system on the Domane.

I have my Domane set up with tubeless gravel slicks right now, sort of thinking of a bike to split the difference between a Warbird and a road bike (not seeking gravel, but not afraid of it), and it is working well so far. No clue if I'll bork the frame riding it like a gravel bike at times - Trek certainly seems to market it that way!

I think if you go for another bike that splits the difference between two or more categories, you'll end up in the same place you are now.
Great to hear your experiences with the Crossrip & Domane. I also have Hy/Rds on my Crossrip and it had crossed my mind to try it with some wider tires on gravel (I currently run 32mm Vittoria Voyager Hypers). Good to know that 38c tires will fit.

How wide a tire can you use with the Domane? I saw one in an LBS with 32mm Bontragers, but it looked like it could go wider.

I need to be honest with myself about how much gravel riding I'm actually likely to do. So far, 99% of my riding has been on paved surfaces; I normally ride around my local suburban area, and to get to decent gravel I'd have to drive for at least 30-45 minutes, which makes going for a bike ride a much longer activity.

It does sound as though I'm just going to end up compromising if I try to buy a single bike for multiple roles, so I'll either have to set my priorities or buy more bikes...which will be a hard sell to my wife!

I like your usage of the Trek Domane. It sounds like you've got a great endurance road bike that isn't too fragile to take off-road now and again. This could suit me well too.

I think I'll just ride my CX bike on & off road some more (I have two wheel sets) and see if I find it lacking in either role before getting a more specialised bike for one or the other.
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Old 07-03-17, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by chaadster
It's hard to sort out what you're thinking about in all of this, because on the one hand you want a new and better commuter, then you say you'd ideally keep the Crossrip and get a better roadie but can't, then it turns out you do have a second bike as a roadie with 32c semi-slicks, yet worry that a gravel bike isn't suited for sportives...it's kind of confusing as to what your priorities are. Maybe you're thinking to sell both to fund a new and better single bike?

In any case, I'd suggest you look at geometry rather than general bike type categories. My thinking here is that the right and sporty geometry will feel fun to ride, irrespective of how the bike is categorized.

I'd think a bike like a Domane AL with 28c tires would be a lot more fun to road-ride on, even with a rack, than your TCX; shorter stays, shorter wheelbase, less trail...it can all add up to a more responsive ride. Lighter, too. And given it's the Crossrip you're most disappointed in, looking at the geometry, you can see it's more "slacked out" than the TCX, so you can see why it might be less fun-feeling to ride.
You're right! I'm going round in circles with the permutations and trying to fit them in accepted bike categories.

I like your suggestions regarding geometry. It's surprising how different my two bikes feel to ride based on a couple of centimetres difference here and there.

The answer is clearly to have a bike for every occasion....
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