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Disc brakes future of road bikes?

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Disc brakes future of road bikes?

Old 07-07-17, 11:21 PM
  #26  
Wileyrat
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Originally Posted by FlashBazbo View Post
You're too young. Back in the 1960's, it was a thing. Then, almost all vehicles switched to discs.
Not really, I'm close to 60, I remember back in the 60's. I definitely was right in the middle of the muscle car era.

I wish I had my old Charger again

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Old 07-08-17, 01:04 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
I'm waiting for suspension forks on my road bike. They were the big news in 1992, and the bike industry were pushing them as the 'must-have' item. Why did they never take off?...
BITD I read about a guy trialing sus forks for CX bikes. They settled on travel, matching frame changes etc but were eventually stopped by the odds of getting them race legal. Might be the same for road bikes.
Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post

Second: I want a suspension seatpost on my carbon bike. Carbon is a firm ride, and a suspension post will take a lot of the butt sting off my long rides on pavement...
What's keeping you?
Thudbuster ST has been around for a long time and is easily adjustable for rider weight.

Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
I worry about getting a bike with disks and getting sued as a result of a collision in a group ride. I hit the binders, and the rider behind with (inferior) rim brakes plows into the rear of my bike, and goes down. This might cause a mass pile-up involving multiple riders and tens of thousands of $ worth of gear.
Why?
Only b/c you MIGHT be able to brake harder/faster doesn't mean that you have to brake harder.
Do you worry about stronger sprinters riding into you too?
If you're in a car, do you worry about being held responsible for being rear-ended by other cars with poorer tires, heavier load or poorer brakes?
blaming a collision on the the guy ahead braking too hard is very rarely a succesful strategy.
If that was how hard you needed to brake, to stay on the road or avoid an obstacle, then what else could you have done?
Only way you could possibly be held accountable for being rear-ended is if you suddenly braked HARD for no good reason.
Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
Plus the risks of getting sliced...
The first widely published injury was eventually ruled to have been caused by a chainring, not a rotor.
The guy who claimed to have gotten his shoe sliced open lead to several videos of people trying to slice things with rotors being posted. And despite having bikes in workstands, with one guy cranking and one guy pushing stuff against the turning rotor, the big cuts simply didn't happen.
But sure, rotors are fairly thin. There is an angle of approach where falling against a disc brake hub might add further injury.
OTOH, that's ALSO where q/r levers traditionally are. How common have injuries from q/r levers been in racing?
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Old 07-08-17, 01:10 AM
  #28  
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I think that disks on my mountain bike are so much superior to V brakes, but the bike weighs 13 pounds more than my road bike so do I really need the power and maintenance of disks on a road bike? I suppose the real benefit of them is if you are using carbon rims. What I do find most desirable are the through axles.
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Old 07-08-17, 01:58 AM
  #29  
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In 1992 suspension was a lot more relevant than today, because ppl used to ride 20mm at very high pressure. With discs there are less limitation on what tyres you can put on the bike. Juste make room in the frame. I recently tried a Domane with (I believe) 32mm tyres and discs. Suspension not needed (or wanted) :-) UCI regulation should only be taken in to account on road bikes intended for actual racing.
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Old 07-08-17, 01:58 AM
  #30  
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I lot of people here with really weak grips.
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Old 07-08-17, 02:12 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by banerjek View Post
After getting tired of replacing so many brifters, I downgraded one of my bikes back to DT shifters. They are cheaper, lighter, totally bombproof, more durable, easier to maintain, better looking, and are easier to skip across gears than other shifting systems. The only drawback they have is you have to take a hand off the bar to shift. But if you don't shift lots, that's a total nonissue.
Nice!
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Old 07-08-17, 09:13 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by trailangel View Post
I lot of people here with really weak grips.
A lot of people here afraid of change. Or just ignorant.
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Old 07-08-17, 09:29 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
A lot of people here afraid of change. Or just ignorant.
Agreed...and possibly more common is the fact that a lot of people are heavily invested in the caliper paradigm either by their frame and/or carbon wheels and suffer confirmation bias...that is they prefer to promote all of the possible shortcomings of road disc-brake technology and overlook the shortcomings of more traditional caliper brakes.

I straddle the fence having a Trek Domane with caliper-brakes and one with disc-brakes. I can say I won't be investing in any new bike that doesn't have road discs going forward.
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Old 07-08-17, 09:46 AM
  #34  
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... and just to add to the fun, here's more mtb tech crossing over to road/gravel:

Dropper posts in the Tour de France? Mavic specs them on neutral bikes - BikeRadar

https://www.bikerumor.com/2017/05/19...spension-fork/

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Old 07-08-17, 09:48 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
A lot of people here afraid of change. Or just ignorant.
Not necessarily afraid of change, just see no need to change. I'm relatively certain disc brakes will come to dominate the market on new road bikes. But I ride vintage and I'm pretty sure I'll be riding calipers and downtube shifters until I'm done. There is no compelling reason to do otherwise.
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Old 07-08-17, 10:34 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
A lot of people here afraid of change. Or just ignorant.
I own six bikes. Two have discs.

I don't think discs are needed for most riders who ride road exclusively. They weigh more, and the difference in stopping power is the difference between more than I need and way more than I need.

Am I afraid of change? Which change?

Or am I ignorant, and of what?
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Old 07-08-17, 11:34 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
A lot of people here afraid of change. Or just ignorant.
Half the group i ride with have disc brake road bikes. The other half have rim brake.
Some disc are hydro and some are mechanical.
Some rim are caliper, some v, and some canti.

We all stop every time we want to.

Simple cost benefit analysis to it all- many havent found the desire to change. I wouldnt say thats being afraid or being ignorant.
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Old 07-08-17, 02:18 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Fox Farm View Post
I think that disks on my mountain bike are so much superior to V brakes, but the bike weighs 13 pounds more than my road bike...
Bike weight alone doesn't matter for the brakes. Bike + rider weight is what brakes have to deal with. Are 13 lbs really an important part of the overall weight?

Originally Posted by Fox Farm View Post
What I do find most desirable are the through axles.
You'd want TAs on a rim brake bike?
Why?
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Old 07-08-17, 02:22 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by trailangel View Post
I lot of people here with really weak grips.
So when are you going to trade your car in for one w/o power steering?
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Old 07-08-17, 02:50 PM
  #40  
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I don't think there is a need for disc brakes on road bikes. They just add weight and look funny. Real riders ride calipers and tubulars.
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Old 07-08-17, 02:59 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by lsberrios1 View Post
I don't think there is a need for disc brakes on road bikes. They just add weight and look funny. Real riders ride calipers and tubulars.
True! Discs are for wusses. So are 25mm tyres, more than 8 speed, 21t+ cassettes, compact cranks and fiber frames. Its all Not needed, as proven by the thousands of riders of years past!

Oh, wait! Did I mention I tried a bike with hydro brakes, electric gears, fiber frame and 32mm tyres. It was sweet!

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Old 07-08-17, 04:14 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by jon c. View Post
Not necessarily afraid of change, just see no need to change. I'm relatively certain disc brakes will come to dominate the market on new road bikes. But I ride vintage and I'm pretty sure I'll be riding calipers and downtube shifters until I'm done. There is no compelling reason to do otherwise.
I probably should have said something like 'at least one of us here is afraid of change'

I ride vintage steel, too ('84 Trek). While it has been fairly modernized with a threadless stem, compact bars, and a 2x11 drivetrain, it will always be a caliper brake bike and I'm fine with that. I won't be selling it any time soon, at least not for the reason of getting a disc brake bike to take its place. But it's not like I can't still appreciate the better braking of my '16 FM079-F with discs, or even my CX1 with just a front disc.

Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
I own six bikes. Two have discs.

I don't think discs are needed for most riders who ride road exclusively. They weigh more, and the difference in stopping power is the difference between more than I need and way more than I need.

Am I afraid of change? Which change?

Or am I ignorant, and of what?
I have five bikes, 2.5 with discs. Stopping is simply a better experience on the disc brake bikes. In some situations, it's a quantifiable difference. In others, not so much. But it's always better. So while most exclusive road riders don't 'need' disc brakes, given the track record of cyclists and new tech, I'm thinking that 'need' won't really factor into the purchase decision too much.

I mean, I didn't 'need' disc brakes on my Chinabomb. But, given my prior experience with discs, I knew that I'd appreciate them if nothing else and in some situations they'd stop me a lot more confidently than rim brakes. If you've never been in a situation where rim brakes didn't stop you confidently, that's cool. I have been there and it's not fun.

Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Half the group i ride with have disc brake road bikes. The other half have rim brake.
Some disc are hydro and some are mechanical.
Some rim are caliper, some v, and some canti.

We all stop every time we want to.

Simple cost benefit analysis to it all- many havent found the desire to change. I wouldnt say thats being afraid or being ignorant.
See my comment above about stopping confidently. I've been witness to rim brakes (granted, not high end ones) not stopping a rider when (or where) they wanted to.

As far as cost/benefit, for the Chinabomb, I wanted some deep rims and to keep things light. So carbon was an obvious choice. Good braking on carbon rims comes at a price, and that price is significantly more relative to my cheap carbon rims than the extra I spent on disc brakes. So for me, discs not only give me more satisfying braking, they allowed me to build a cheaper bike.

Originally Posted by lsberrios1 View Post
I don't think there is a need for disc brakes on road bikes. They just add weight and look funny. Real riders ride calipers and tubulars.
To continue my comment above, while that Chinabomb currently has tubulars on it, I could confidently run carbon clinchers without the worries of blowing off a tire. And does this bike really look 'funny' to you (it's ok if you do)?

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Old 07-08-17, 04:28 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post

To continue my comment above, while that Chinabomb currently has tubulars on it, I could confidently run carbon clinchers without the worries of blowing off a tire. And does this bike really look 'funny' to you (it's ok if you do)?

If you were running tubulars you wouldn't have the issue of blowing tires... even tubeless!
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Old 07-08-17, 05:07 PM
  #44  
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I keep looking at the idea of disc brakes on a road bike. What stops me are two things:

1. I don't want that ugly hydro line running down the bottom of the downtube. That is just butt ugly on a road bike.

2. The weight penalty is still too high at about 1Kg (according to Lennard Zinn and confirmed when I've had frame builders look it. Frame has to be beefed up in the fork, head tube etc.. and the brakes are heavier. I want to see that come down first.

So if, and it's a big if, I went to disc brakes it would be with mechanical disc brakes so I could run the cables internally.

For a pure road bike, it's really not a big deal but for a gravel/adventure bike, it's a necessity for the ability to run wider than a 28mm tire.


J.
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Old 07-08-17, 05:29 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
So if, and it's a big if, I went to disc brakes it would be with mechanical disc brakes so I could run the cables internally.



J.
My hydro rear is ran internally.
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Old 07-08-17, 05:33 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by adamhenry View Post
My hydro rear is ran internally.
I am using mechanical disc calipers but my frame has internal cable routing and no provisions for external routing. I don't see why hydraulic couldn't or shouldn't be routed internally, too.
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Old 07-08-17, 06:12 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by FlashBazbo View Post
Disc brakes are the future. For those who care about performance first, there is no other choice. And let's be honest -- the ambulance chasing lawyers have a bigger say on this than we might like to admit. When you have a braking system that is so obviously better than the traditional system, the plaintiffs' lawyers are going to sue any manufacturer blind who persists in producing and selling rim braked bikes. EVERY case where a rim-braked bike runs into something -- a stopping or right turning car, for example -- it will be argued that the inferior brakes were to blame. Rim-braked bikes will quickly be deemed a "defective product" in the eyes of the plaintiff's bar. (And they will make a LOT of money on that argument. Maybe I should change careers!) A manufacturer would be foolish NOT to shift as much product as possible to disc brakes.


Will rim braked bikes become extinct? No. After all, I think it's still possible to buy a bike with cantilever brakes -- by comparison, little better than dragging your feet on the ground. But they will become more and more difficult to find.


The UCI is being dragged screaming into this. This issue has caused them to lose a lot of their previous influence.
A number of years ago a device called Saw Stop was introduced. Every year there are thousands of lacerations and severed fingers caused by blades on table saws. It seemed logical that saw manufacturers would embrace the technology to make their products safer. A funny thing happened though. Instead of embracing this game changer, saw manufacturers rejected Saw Stop, largely because embracing it would be an admission that the hundreds of thousands of saws without it were now dramatically less safe.
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Old 07-08-17, 06:21 PM
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Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
So if, and it's a big if, I went to disc brakes it would be with mechanical disc brakes so I could run the cables internally.

For a pure road bike, it's really not a big deal but for a gravel/adventure bike, it's a necessity for the ability to run wider than a 28mm tire.
Dont follow. Disc brakes are a necessity for gravel bikes due to the ability to run a tire larger than 28?
What does one have to do with the other?...or maybe i misread.
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Old 07-08-17, 06:59 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
I am using mechanical disc calipers but my frame has internal cable routing and no provisions for external routing. I don't see why hydraulic couldn't or shouldn't be routed internally, too.
Same here - internally routed front and rear hydro. I know of no reason routing for hydro would be any different than for mechanical.
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Old 07-08-17, 07:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Wested View Post
I think you will discs grow increasingly popular until the UCI either lowers or eliminates entirely the antiquated 6.8kg weight limit.
I think you nailed it.
That is if you are of the belief that "Road Cycling" means riding the kind of bike ridden in Road Racing.
If that is the case, that market is mostly driven by what pro, and to a lessor extent, non-pro racers ride.
Given races where there are no requirements for weight - say USA Cycling - I don't think we will see them much at all.

Both power meters and disc brakes can be there as the 6.8kg limit is easy to meet.

Lower to 6 kg, or 5.5 kg I don't think we'd see many in road races as there is not much of a reason to have them for the excess weight and aero penalty. It would also make motors easier to find - but another topic.

I think they are on a decrease in group rides vs last year. I know a few locals that have switched back to rim brakes.
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