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Gunnar Roadie experience.

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Gunnar Roadie experience.

Old 09-05-17, 09:33 AM
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Wspsux
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Gunnar Roadie experience.

Hi Everyone,

I'm looking for testimony from Gunnar Roadie riders. I'm considering a Gunnar build for my road bike. I'm cross shopping it against Pinarello Gan S... My heart says build a steel bike but my brain says to keep it simple with the Gan S Ultegra build.

While we're at it, any Gan S testimony is welcome as well.
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Old 09-05-17, 10:22 AM
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one of my LBSs carry them. They ride nice for a steel frame. I still much prefer carbon but if you want steel you can't go wrong with gunnar.
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Old 09-05-17, 10:30 AM
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Could you comment on some of the short falls it had verse similar spec'd carbon?
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Old 09-05-17, 10:43 AM
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I have a new Gunnar CrossHairs. Welded in Wisconsin. Very nice looking welds. Long distance comfort. Air-hardening steel, which changes up the game completely over Reynolds 531-era materials. Oversize downtube = comfortable ride without any of the bottom bracket flex of steel designs from decades past.

My friend at work has shown me evidence that Giant makes Pinarellos in Asia, just FYI, along with a majority of the other carbon frames on the market . . However, I would guess Pinarellos are comfortable.
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Old 09-05-17, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Wspsux View Post
Could you comment on some of the short falls it had verse similar spec'd carbon?
weight and aero is the biggest one for me at similar pricepoints. I also personally don't find steel absorbs road vibration as well carbon but haven't done an exactly like for like comparison with the same cockpit etc
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Old 09-05-17, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by randallr View Post

My friend at work has shown me evidence that Giant makes Pinarellos in Asia, just FYI, along with a majority of the other carbon frames on the market . . However, I would guess Pinarellos are comfortable.
They probably do, and this is a good thing. Giant is arguably the best carbon frame builder out there.
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Old 09-05-17, 10:56 AM
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Oh - one thought - what are your tire width requirements? Carbon frames typically are for rather narrow tires
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Old 09-05-17, 11:19 AM
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Steel will be more supple and forgiving depending on geometry...Gunnar has other options apart from the roadie.

If you want stiff and responsive its better to look outside the Gunnar range. But if you are going to take comfort and leisure rides, go for something with more tire clearance. It's silly to get a semi custom frame like Gunnar and be limited to 25C tires as per Gunnar literature.




I just don't see much point in getting a steel frame with race geometry...go relaxed if you want to have a soft steel feel to the road. As for the Pinarello, there are lot's of options in that price range.

You can run a touring frame as you would a road bike with narrow tires, but really steel plus 32C tires...plush, comfy fun. That's really what steel is good for. Otherwise, so many competing makers do a road frame with tight geometry and great short wheelbase for climbing and bombing hills.

Consider the Pinarello a sports car while the Gunnar frames are sport utility vehicles...There isn't really a right or wrong. But you should consider them radically different.
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Old 09-05-17, 01:03 PM
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I ride a (coupled) Gunnar Sport that I special ordered ~6 years ago. It's pretty similar to the Roadie, but uses long-reach brakes and slightly slacker geometry. The frame definitely doesn't hold me back while snagging Strava KOMs, dropping my training partners, or riding with the A group.

I briefly owned a Fisher Cronus full carbon road frame (similar to Trek Madone) during the same time period. The carbon frame felt lighter, but that was it for improvements. The Gunnar is more comfortable and more responsive.

I've had a couple of really nice steel and titanium frames (and a ludicrously stiff aluminum frame) over the years that felt more responsive than my Gunnar Sport. I've also had a whole bunch of mid-range steel frame offerings that felt "blah" in comparison. My Gunnar is more comfortable than any of the aluminum or carbon road frames I've had in the past.

To the OP -- how big a priority is frame aerodynamics? The Pinarello could save you a few seconds in a race. If you're not racing (and placing on the podium), I wouldn't bother with the Pinarello.
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Old 09-05-17, 02:38 PM
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Gunnar makes nice bikes. I'm happy with the Sport I've owned for several years. Gunnar pluses are choices of sizes, proven geometry, paint choices, standard sizes for seatposts and headsets. Also real bottom brackets. On the other hand, their(Waterford) paint jobs have been fragile and the Roadie seems to be limited to 25mm tires. Put a 25 on the new wider rims and you are easily at 28. Might need some clarification from them as to what the fit issues are. A frame built up the way you want it is usually more satisfying than some easier off the rack options, IMO.
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Old 09-07-17, 05:30 AM
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Originally Posted by OneIsAllYouNeed View Post
I ride a (coupled) Gunnar Sport that I special ordered ~6 years ago. It's pretty similar to the Roadie, but uses long-reach brakes and slightly slacker geometry. The frame definitely doesn't hold me back while snagging Strava KOMs, dropping my training partners, or riding with the A group.

I briefly owned a Fisher Cronus full carbon road frame (similar to Trek Madone) during the same time period. The carbon frame felt lighter, but that was it for improvements. The Gunnar is more comfortable and more responsive.

I've had a couple of really nice steel and titanium frames (and a ludicrously stiff aluminum frame) over the years that felt more responsive than my Gunnar Sport. I've also had a whole bunch of mid-range steel frame offerings that felt "blah" in comparison. My Gunnar is more comfortable than any of the aluminum or carbon road frames I've had in the past.

To the OP -- how big a priority is frame aerodynamics? The Pinarello could save you a few seconds in a race. If you're not racing (and placing on the podium), I wouldn't bother with the Pinarello.
If I were racing, then an aero carbon frame would definitely be in the running. But the rider is responsible for something like 70% of the drag on a bike. If you're optimizing for aero, you could also do wheels, helmet, clothes. Moreover, steel may not damp out all the vibrations, but it is still very comfortable. I've not had extended experience with a modern carbon frame, but I would bet that comfort over a long ride would be comparable to steel, given similar tires.

That said, I do note that the nominal tire clearance on the Roadie is 25c. That seems strange. The Sport's clearance is much bigger, but it does require long reach calipers, and few people make those. Also, if you're using Shimano, I don't believe Shimano makes any calipers that are fully compatible with their SLR-EV brakes (or whatever the acronym is). You can use their older R650s or any other brake from Tektro or Velo Orange, but it won't have full compatibility. That said, it should be more than sufficient power, but it's still a minor strike against the Sport. I'd contact Gunnar and ask how much leeway there is with that nominal tire clearance. You may think that you won't want anything more than a 25, but your needs might change. Clearance for 28s would be nice.
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Old 09-07-17, 05:57 AM
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Originally Posted by randallr View Post
Oh - one thought - what are your tire width requirements? Carbon frames typically are for rather narrow tires
The website says 25mm max, mine has 28mm on it.
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Old 09-07-17, 01:06 PM
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I built up a Gunnar Roadie last year. I absolutely love it. As others have said with the tire clearance, it can fit larger than 25mm tires. For mine, I have Conti GP4000II 25mm set up on Easton EA90 wheels, and they measure to a real width of a little over 28mm and have plenty of room to spare. I would say you're more limited by your brake caliper choice than by the frame. I decided to go with the Roadie frame instead of a carbon bike because the similar purpose bikes I had access to (Cannondale Synapse, Ghost Nivolet LC) felt like riding a wet log in comparison. I'm happy with my choice.
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Old 02-15-20, 05:17 PM
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Can anyone help with sizing for the Gunnar Roadie? I'm just under 6 feet, if not 6 feet tall. Bottom bracket to saddle is 29.5 inches. I thinking 56, but maybe 58. Don't see too much difference between the 2.
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Old 02-15-20, 07:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Slowridr View Post
Can anyone help with sizing for the Gunnar Roadie? I'm just under 6 feet, if not 6 feet tall. Bottom bracket to saddle is 29.5 inches. I thinking 56, but maybe 58. Don't see too much difference between the 2.
I think you can call them, at least you could a few years ago, and discuss your fit. A dealer should be able to help. I would be most concerned with the top tube length/reach and the stack.
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Old 02-15-20, 07:53 PM
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In my Gunnar buy, the dealer (Vecchios) added a lot of value. They are quite skilled on fitting and knew exactly what would work best for me. As a result, it's the most comfortable bike I've ever ridden (I've ridden Raleighs and Kleins in the past, former too whippy, latter way too stiff)
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Old 02-15-20, 08:30 PM
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Originally Posted by big john View Post
I think you can call them, at least you could a few years ago, and discuss your fit. A dealer should be able to help. I would be most concerned with the top tube length/reach and the stack.
Originally Posted by randallr View Post
In my Gunnar buy, the dealer (Vecchios) added a lot of value. They are quite skilled on fitting and knew exactly what would work best for me. As a result, it's the most comfortable bike I've ever ridden (I've ridden Raleighs and Kleins in the past, former too whippy, latter way too stiff)
No dealer close by (Canada). I'm gonna order straight from them and build myself.
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Old 02-15-20, 09:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Slowridr View Post
No dealer close by (Canada). I'm gonna order straight from them and build myself.
Good luck figuring out the fit. They make a fine product (I have one) and they seem to be good people. A friend spoke to Richard Schwinn by phone to get a replacement fork for his Paramount. He said Richard was easy to work with.
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