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Sore quads question

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Sore quads question

Old 09-09-17, 03:45 PM
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bpt513
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Sore quads question

I recently bought a new used bike that has a 53/39 172.5mm crank. My old bike had 50/34 170mm. I had my new bike professional fit at LBS. I did a 60 mile ride today at the same pace (19.5mph) I normally do. Now my quads are really sore compared to the old set up. I do plan on getting a new compact crankset w/170mm.

Would the 53/39 172.5 set up cause the quad soreness since I'm not used to it? My average cadence was 99 (usually 95) but felt quads giving out at about mile 40.

thanks
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Old 09-09-17, 04:00 PM
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Was that cadence what you are normally used to? Or was it lower? I can see how if it were lower you may have had to put marginally more force per stroke to maintain the same speed with a standard chainset.
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Old 09-09-17, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by mcours2006 View Post
Was that cadence what you are normally used to? Or was it lower? I can see how if it were lower you may have had to put marginally more force per stroke to maintain the same speed with a standard chainset.
My norm is 95. I had ridden the new bike 2 times before my fit and it caused my quads soreness. The LBS told me my fit was not right and caused the quad issue. Maybe my soreness kicked in late due to my previous rides.
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Old 09-09-17, 04:06 PM
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Try a few more rides... that is a pretty quick pace, longish ride, and high cadence.

Sore legs means you're working hard

Perhaps the new "fit" changed something else such as saddle position that you just have to get used to.

Changing chainrings and cassettes means you may not have your favorite chainring/rear sprocket combo (thus increasing from 95 to 99 RPM), and may also take some time to get used to. Or you could try shifting to a different gear.
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Old 09-09-17, 04:09 PM
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I had a similar occurance when I changed my cleat position back 14 mm. This changed the mechanics of my pedal stroke. I was using my quads and less calves. I had initial quad soreness which has resolved itself. The feeling was significant as I adapted.
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Old 09-09-17, 04:28 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
Try a few more rides... that is a pretty quick pace, longish ride, and high cadence.

Sore legs means you're working hard

Perhaps the new "fit" changed something else such as saddle position that you just have to get used to.

Changing chainrings and cassettes means you may not have your favorite chainring/rear sprocket combo (thus increasing from 95 to 99 RPM), and may also take some time to get used to. Or you could try shifting to a different gear.
I did the same ride 2 weeks ago on old bike and quads felt ok. I'm sure once I get compact crank setup like I had and ride more it will get better.
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Old 09-09-17, 04:51 PM
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It's not the ring sizes. You still have the same gears you always had, at least the ones you ride most of the time. Do you realize that you have to lower your saddle for the 172.5 mm cranks as compared to the 170s. Other than that the small difference shouldn't be a problem are you sure you have your saddle positioned relative to the bottom bracket just like on the old bike. That and the saddle height are the most likely causes of your problem.
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Old 09-09-17, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
It's not the ring sizes. You still have the same gears you always had, at least the ones you ride most of the time. Do you realize that you have to lower your saddle for the 172.5 mm cranks as compared to the 170s. Other than that the small difference shouldn't be a problem are you sure you have your saddle positioned relative to the bottom bracket just like on the old bike. That and the saddle height are the most likely causes of your problem.
I had the the new bike professionally fit this past week. But I will be getting the same crankset as the old bike before I ride again.
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Old 09-09-17, 05:37 PM
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Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
It's not the ring sizes. You still have the same gears you always had, at least the ones you ride most of the time. Do you realize that you have to lower your saddle for the 172.5 mm cranks as compared to the 170s. Other than that the small difference shouldn't be a problem are you sure you have your saddle positioned relative to the bottom bracket just like on the old bike. That and the saddle height are the most likely causes of your problem.
The saddle height is the same as old bike.
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Old 09-09-17, 06:46 PM
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Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
It's not the ring sizes. You still have the same gears you always had, at least the ones you ride most of the time. Do you realize that you have to lower your saddle for the 172.5 mm cranks as compared to the 170s. Other than that the small difference shouldn't be a problem are you sure you have your saddle positioned relative to the bottom bracket just like on the old bike. That and the saddle height are the most likely causes of your problem.
In thinking more about this I also used aero bars. I originally just transferred to new bike. The pads seemed to close almost a 90 degree angle which seemed to close. I moved them up as there was only about 1" of room to move. It seemed better but seemed not as comfortable as old bike. Could that be the problem?
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Old 09-09-17, 10:55 PM
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Have you considered a recovery drink?
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Old 09-09-17, 11:06 PM
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Originally Posted by bpt513 View Post
The saddle height is the same as old bike.
The crank arm is not. Raise the saddle until your back just starts to hurt, and then back it down 1mm.
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Old 09-10-17, 02:19 AM
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My experience with burning quads was due to a low saddle height.
Try raising your saddle a 1/4 inch at time and note any differences.
Maybe get fitted for that bike?
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Old 09-10-17, 04:53 AM
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Did you do anything to your quads that was not cycling-related? Last week after a 30km ride, I cleaned the chains on a couple of bikes, and did some other cleaning. I had to squat down a lot while working, and though it wasn't for all that long, the next day my quads were quite sore. At first, it never crossed my mind that the cleaning had made me sore, I thought it was from the ride. But I had done the same ride many times over the previous weeks with no soreness. It took me a little while to figure out that it was the work after the ride, and not the ride itself which had made me sore.
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Old 09-10-17, 06:15 AM
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Originally Posted by bpt513 View Post
In thinking more about this I also used aero bars. I originally just transferred to new bike. The pads seemed to close almost a 90 degree angle which seemed to close. I moved them up as there was only about 1" of room to move. It seemed better but seemed not as comfortable as old bike. Could that be the problem?
That's probably the issue. Your position in the aero bars changes the balance of muscles used to pedal.

As already stated, the chainring sizes aren't contributing to the soreness. My guess is that your body had adapted to your old position and had to work differently in the new one. Assuming that the new fit was correctly done, the best idea is to not mess with position changes until your body adapts to the new position. If you're getting a new compact crankset, get the same crank arm length and you should be good.
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Old 09-10-17, 06:26 AM
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Originally Posted by revchuck View Post
That's probably the issue. Your position in the aero bars changes the balance of muscles used to pedal.

As already stated, the chainring sizes aren't contributing to the soreness. My guess is that your body had adapted to your old position and had to work differently in the new one. Assuming that the new fit was correctly done, the best idea is to not mess with position changes until your body adapts to the new position. If you're getting a new compact crankset, get the same crank arm length and you should be good.

I hope that's the case. My quads hurt more today than they ever did. I have put 2,200 miles on the old bike with aero bars never adjusting the seat or stem with no quad issues and increasing my speed 1 mph. Time to give them a rest till new crank arrives.

thanks
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Old 09-10-17, 09:32 AM
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Originally Posted by revchuck View Post
That's probably the issue. Your position in the aero bars changes the balance of muscles used to pedal.

As already stated, the chainring sizes aren't contributing to the soreness. My guess is that your body had adapted to your old position and had to work differently in the new one. Assuming that the new fit was correctly done, the best idea is to not mess with position changes until your body adapts to the new position. If you're getting a new compact crankset, get the same crank arm length and you should be good.
Also in checking seat after bike fit it has been moved forward 25mm as compared to where I had it set on old bike. That should kill quads until I get use to it. Damn.
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Old 09-10-17, 09:47 AM
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That's a pretty big change, no wonder you're feeling it!
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Old 09-10-17, 07:43 PM
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Post less, ride more. Problem will solve itself.
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Old 09-11-17, 07:00 AM
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You will need to lower and slide forward the saddle with longer arms. If your saddle is at the same spot, in relation to the BB, as the bike with 170s, you will be working different muscles, which could lead to sore quads.
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Old 09-11-17, 07:08 AM
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Originally Posted by bpt513 View Post
Also in checking seat after bike fit it has been moved forward 25mm as compared to where I had it set on old bike. That should kill quads until I get use to it. Damn.
Personally, I wouldn't try to get used to it. I'd move the saddle back into a position that enables me to use more muscle groups instead of loading primarily quads. Unless, of course, you've been underutilising the quads until now, but that would be quite unusual as more often the opposite is the case.
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