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I have tubeless option..should I go for it?

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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

I have tubeless option..should I go for it?

Old 11-05-17, 07:04 AM
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I have tubeless option..should I go for it?

my bike came with mavic comets with mavic tubeless tires.....i am running tubes with some conti's . only prob is getting the tire on after changing flat is real pain in the butt...so i was wondering if u guys think i should give the tubeless a go? thanx
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Old 11-05-17, 07:54 AM
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Once you wear out your current tubes tires I would definitely give it a try. The new tubeless tires aren’t nearly as hard to get on, but the main thing is that flats are so much more rare that roadside repairs are basically null. I have over 8000 miles on my tubeless and have never had a roadside flat including many miles of dirt and gravel riding. My average tire lasts about 1500 miles or so. Currently having great success with Schwalb’s but also really liked the Bontrager R3 TLR’s.

Good luck!
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Old 11-05-17, 08:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Billy1111
my bike came with mavic comets with mavic tubeless tires.....i am running tubes with some conti's . only prob is getting the tire on after changing flat is real pain in the butt...so i was wondering if u guys think i should give the tubeless a go? thanx
Yes, you should definitely give it a go, 'specially if you've already got the rims and the tires.

Did the rims come with tubeless tape installed? Were valve stems included as well? I assume that they didn't send a bottle of sealant - you'll want to pick some up at the shop. I've been using Orange Seal with good results - it seems to be a sealant that's widely available and pretty well-received across the board, so not a bad place to start.

A word of caution, though - getting tires on and off isn't necessarily going to be any easier with tubeless tires, it may even be more difficult. A lot of it comes down to technique, though.

You'll notice that there's a well running down the middle of the rim bed; when installing a tire, tubeless or not, you want to make sure that you keep the tire beads in that well as you work your way around the rim - it'll give you more room to get that last bit up and over the rim. Also along those lines, you should start opposite the valve stem and finish at the stem; the base of the stem takes up a chunk of space in the well, and can make things unnecessarily tight and difficult if you don't avoid it until the end. Also, this puts the tire in the proper position for inflation/seating on the rim - you want the beads together in the well along the entire circumference, except at the stem. When inflating, goal is to build up enough air pressure to get the beads to pop up out of the well and on to the shoulders of the rim bed; having the beads together in the well, along with a little bit of lubrication on the rim tape (spray bottle of soapy water) goes a long way towards that goal.

Good luck!
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Old 11-05-17, 08:20 AM
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I don't want to question ones tire changing experience or ability but....
I have never had a tire that was too hard to get on and rarely ever need levers with proper technique. It is not a matter of stretching the tire over the rim edge, it is compressing the tire down into the rim and working your way around both side pulling up towards the top, like grab, push in and pull up, slide hands up and repeat until you get to the top, hold the tire with palm and use thumbs to get that last part over the hump. Having a third hand would make that easier but the tire placed on the ground standing up using the ground as a third hand makes it far easier. Wiggle an tap around the tire to get everything neutral and air up. The same technique with the hands pushing in and up is used to get it off without levers too.
If a tire was "too small" to fit on a rim and required brutally excessive force to mount, it not be big enough to center itself and lock up into the bead hook on the rim once on. Meaning if the tire truly was too small, it would not work well once you forced it on and a pinch flat risk would be high. Talc or something like windex window spray can lube it up and help it slide into the hook better but it may still be a little too small to be ideal.
There are exceptions and some tires are more flexible, some rims might have a larger side and I'm sure people have come across tire combos that just suck but I doubt it is many as people report.


There are numerous advantages and disadvantages to going tubeless. Tire mounting ability shouldn't be the one that tips the scales in favor of one or the other. With tubeless, carrying a small patch kit, even a tiny skab kit if desired makes sense. With tubeless your only hope after total fail is carrying a tube and you'll be back into the same hard to mount position.



flame suit on.

Last edited by u235; 11-05-17 at 08:50 AM.
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Old 11-05-17, 08:47 AM
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thanx for the replies....... i have changed quite a few tires in my day, most of them go like you said. I don't claim to be an expert thou so maybe my technique isn't as polished as yours but getting these on is really freaking hard. I'm gonna take them on and off a few times at home to try to get the technique down.
I do have the valves also...i just ordered the sealant and will give them a try.
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Old 11-05-17, 01:59 PM
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Good call! Sealant is a must. As luck would have it, at the top of this morning’s climb I could hear some air escaping. Found a cut in the tire (they’re at the end of their lives). Sealant was doing exactly as it’s intended. Lost a bit of air but still made it home 20 miles later, even had time for coffee, so I can still say that after all this time I’ve yet to have a roadside flat with tubeless! alas time for a new tire though.
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Old 11-05-17, 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by robbyville
Good call! Sealant is a must. As luck would have it, at the top of this morning’s climb I could hear some air escaping. Found a cut in the tire (they’re at the end of their lives). Sealant was doing exactly as it’s intended. Lost a bit of air but still made it home 20 miles later, even had time for coffee, so I can still say that after all this time I’ve yet to have a roadside flat with tubeless! alas time for a new tire though.

when that happens you can add air right???? what are you gonna replace them with?
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Old 11-05-17, 02:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Billy1111
when that happens you can add air right????
Yup.

Last week, I heard a hissing. At first, I thought that a leaf had gotten stuck in the chainstays or something... and then I saw the sealant all over the seat tube and stays and a white patch of goo on the tire. Stopped to inspect and found a big construction staple in the tire, with both tips piercing the carcass. Had to use a multitool to get under the staple and yank it out, at which point the hissing/bubbling restarted. Lifted the rear tire, gave it a 20 sec spin to let the sealant find/fill the leaks. Rode slowly for a few hundred yards, just to give the sealant more time and then I stopped and topped off with the mini-pump and then kept riding for another two hours.

That was a particularly bad twin puncture, but often times you won't even lose enough air for it to be a concern. Sometimes you don't even know that you've had a puncture until you get home and see some sealant sprayed on the frame.
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Old 11-05-17, 04:24 PM
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OP,

Your Comete’s are built to USTR spec, so it would be wise to go with a USTR tire (which I think are only available from Mavic at this time, although it is an open standard, so I expect other brands will be on the way), especially if ease of installation and removal is something on your radar.

USTR is designed as a wheel/tire standard, and easy setup is a key feature.
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Old 11-05-17, 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by chaadster
OP,

Your Comete’s are built to USTR spec, so it would be wise to go with a USTR tire (which I think are only available from Mavic at this time, although it is an open standard, so I expect other brands will be on the way), especially if ease of installation and removal is something on your radar.

USTR is designed as a wheel/tire standard, and easy setup is a key feature.
yes thats what I'm gonna put on now, the Yksion Pro UST tire...hopefully they roll nice....i think they are only 120 tpi....hopefully they feel good
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Old 11-05-17, 06:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Billy1111
when that happens you can add air right???? what are you gonna replace them with?
Yup just like the others said, you can add air if needed. In my case one of the things I like about running tubeless is that I can run lower pressures without worrying about pinch flats. I’d say I rode the 30 miles with about 75psi which I love. I pumped a little extra this morning since I was climbing slowly.

I’m not sure what I’m going to get next, probablybthe Bontrager’s again. These Schwalb’s were pretty nice though. I just put some Specialized Turbo’s on another set If wheels (tubed) that I like a lot so might see if they have any good TLR variations
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Old 11-06-17, 02:23 PM
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Originally Posted by u235
I don't want to question ones tire changing experience or ability but....
I have never had a tire that was too hard to get on and rarely ever need levers with proper technique. It is not a matter of stretching the tire over the rim edge, it is compressing the tire down into the rim and working your way around both side pulling up towards the top, like grab, push in and pull up, slide hands up and repeat until you get to the top, hold the tire with palm and use thumbs to get that last part over the hump. Having a third hand would make that easier but the tire placed on the ground standing up using the ground as a third hand makes it far easier. Wiggle an tap around the tire to get everything neutral and air up. The same technique with the hands pushing in and up is used to get it off without levers too.
If a tire was "too small" to fit on a rim and required brutally excessive force to mount, it not be big enough to center itself and lock up into the bead hook on the rim once on. Meaning if the tire truly was too small, it would not work well once you forced it on and a pinch flat risk would be high. Talc or something like windex window spray can lube it up and help it slide into the hook better but it may still be a little too small to be ideal.
There are exceptions and some tires are more flexible, some rims might have a larger side and I'm sure people have come across tire combos that just suck but I doubt it is many as people report.


There are numerous advantages and disadvantages to going tubeless. Tire mounting ability shouldn't be the one that tips the scales in favor of one or the other. With tubeless, carrying a small patch kit, even a tiny skab kit if desired makes sense. With tubeless your only hope after total fail is carrying a tube and you'll be back into the same hard to mount position.



flame suit on.
How many tubeless tires have you mounted?
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