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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

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Old 12-07-17, 01:52 AM   #76
SethAZ
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It's like...~170" normally.
I think it puts things more starkly into perspective to convert this to feet. That's over 14 feet of rain per year. Egads.

I'm a little north of @GuitarBob but yeah, even the 12" or whatever it is we get each year is deceiving because we tend to get most of it all at once, in a small number of downpours, either during the spring, or during the summer monsoons, and it can go literally months between rains. I think it sprinkled two nights ago, and I can't even tell you when it last did that where I live. I was annoyed that it was overcast over my house well into the day, since it meant that it took forever to get back up to the 70s from the 40s that night, and I had to ride in the chilliness. It'll probably rain a little more from time to time over the next couple of months, but it won't amount to much actual measured precipitation. We just entered our prime cycling season a month or so ago.
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Old 12-07-17, 05:48 AM   #77
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Wow, @Sullalto. People are nuts.
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Old 12-07-17, 05:55 AM   #78
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Wow, @Sullalto. People are nuts.
Dude. I'm in a National Park. In a rainforest. Full of huge old growth giants. I had a guy complain because he drove 15 hours to get here and all he wanted to do all day was sit down to watch some tv. But the trees were too tall and blocked the satellite in his RV. And he just wanted to let me know that he wasn't going to pay for this disappointment.


The trees were too tall.


Jokes on him, the reservation was prepaid. I already had his money.

(Why would you drive that far, to this location to sit on a couch and watch TV? You can do that at home).

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Old 12-07-17, 05:59 AM   #79
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even the 12" or whatever it is we get each year is deceiving because we tend to get most of it all at once, in a small number of downpours, either during the spring, or during the summer monsoons, and it can go literally months between rains.
You might go a couple months in summer between rain. But the rest of the year, it's .25-1" of rain a day, 6 days a week.

I tracked the hourly forecast for a couple weeks last year. The hourly forecast, for 19 straight days, was drizzling. The entire time.

After 19 days I gave up and stopped checking. But that month was 36". 20-25"/month is more normal.
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Old 12-07-17, 10:50 AM   #80
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You might go a couple months in summer between rain. But the rest of the year, it's .25-1" of rain a day, 6 days a week.

I tracked the hourly forecast for a couple weeks last year. The hourly forecast, for 19 straight days, was drizzling. The entire time.

After 19 days I gave up and stopped checking. But that month was 36". 20-25"/month is more normal.
I'm unfamiliar with the park you're at, but I'm impressed by the drainage required to handle that much.

Around here modern housing and other developments will design playgrounds and parks and such with their boundaries, and not because they give a crap about residents' emotional well-being or any of that stuff. They put the park or playground in there, and design it so it's 4-6 feet lower in elevation from the rest of the development, and then subtly angle all of the streets in the development toward it, just to provide drainage. A few times a year we'll get a downpour that drops maybe an inch of water, and those parks and playgrounds end up 3-4 feet deep, and take several days for it to all soak in and disappear. I can't imagine what rivers, streams, etc. you must have running through that park ability to handle an inch or more every day.
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Old 12-07-17, 11:23 AM   #81
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But can you tell the difference in true double blind tests?

Time and time again, the vast majority of people can't in all sorts of tests. To borrow a phrase from another hobby, 'the butt dyno is poorly calibrated.'.
I'm not really sure how a double blind test could be carried out. I predict that I could, but I also believe one good test is worth a thousand expert opinions.

What I can say is I got a pair of $300 (cross country) ski poles as a gift, and when I broke one in a crash, I replaced them with a $75 pair. One is obviously a better pole than the other, it's lighter but it's also optimized for pendulum weight. At the end of a long ski day, same laps on the same trail, my shoulders are always much more sore from using the lesser poles than they were with the better ones.
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Old 12-07-17, 11:32 AM   #82
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I can't imagine what rivers, streams, etc. you must have running through that park ability to handle an inch or more every day.
A few years ago we completed the largest dam removal project in history on the Elwha River, near the park @Sullato is talking about.



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Old 12-07-17, 11:18 PM   #83
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I'm unfamiliar with the park you're at, but I'm impressed by the drainage required to handle that much.

Around here modern housing and other developments will design playgrounds and parks and such with their boundaries, and not because they give a crap about residents' emotional well-being or any of that stuff. They put the park or playground in there, and design it so it's 4-6 feet lower in elevation from the rest of the development, and then subtly angle all of the streets in the development toward it, just to provide drainage. A few times a year we'll get a downpour that drops maybe an inch of water, and those parks and playgrounds end up 3-4 feet deep, and take several days for it to all soak in and disappear. I can't imagine what rivers, streams, etc. you must have running through that park ability to handle an inch or more every day.
Here's a map: look at all the waterways. https://www.nps.gov/olym/planyourvisit/maps.htm

Deep topsoil and water hungry plants(big ass trees) help. The limiting factor for logging out here isn't how fast the trees grow, it's processing and transport. Low lying clearcut is a swampy wetland until the trees go in.

Olympic National Park/Forest on the Olympic Peninsula is just not that big an area, honestly. Probably all the rivers are under 100 miles, so they drain relatively quickly. They just don't have time to get truly big(Like the Columbia, Mississippi, Missouri, etc). There are also lots of them, and they drain to the ocean, not each other.

The Elwha, with the dam removals Forrest mentioned, is ~50 miles I think. From headwater to ocean. Side note, the road got washed away again-closed to vehicles, but open to cyclists for the next 6-12 months, probably. Olympic Hot Springs are now going to be mostly empty again. I suspect it's a great ride.

The area also has lots of small ridges/valleys/ravines. All the major rivers all have multiple forks.

But yeah, there are so many creeks and streams lots of them aren't even named.

Another huge factor is that there just aren't that many people out here. I could draw a circle with a 30 mile radius from this shack I live in and it might include 2000 people. So if somewhere has exceptionally **** drainage, well, just don't put your house there. Drainage becomes a lot harder the more dense you build, and most of the rainforest is pretty empty of people. The towns do you have drainage issues, but that's an infrastructure problem from population growth more than a rain problem. The towns tend to be in rain shadows.

Speaking of rain shadows, there's also a ton of micro climates-15 miles can halve or double your annual rainfall. So people tend to settle in the rain shadow.

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Old 12-08-17, 11:14 AM   #84
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A few years ago we completed the largest dam removal project in history on the Elwha River, near the park @Sullato is talking about.



Absolutely beautiful scenery. I would love to live close to that.
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Old 12-08-17, 11:47 AM   #85
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No doubt. That's just stunning. I have to hope that the park is well setup for exploration by folks on mountain bikes or something. That would be amazing.
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Old 12-08-17, 12:47 PM   #86
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That's Olympic National Park, FYI.

I don't think you can ride a bike anywhere except the 2 or 3 roads that go partway in. It's mostly Wilderness. If you want to see the interior, you're doing it on foot. It's not a coincidence that the quietest place in the contiguous US is in that park.

But there's a 17 mile road that goes from sea level to glacier level, cyclists ride it for the challenge.
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Old 12-10-17, 11:07 AM   #87
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Yes, the wheel upgrade has been the easiest, most effective upgrade you can make to a stock bike for a long time. But I had not run the numbers in a long time. So bear with me . . .
The best equipment upgrades are a decent set of tires and aero jersey.

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But after weighing in both sets of wheels . . . the Ksyrium Elites save 1.3 pounds over the Axis Sports. ONE POINT THREE POUNDS! I'm impressed and a little amazed. (I didn't think the Axis wheels were that heavy.) It's a pleasant surprise. Granted, the wheelset cost me almost as much as the bike did, but I'm feeling pretty good about the change.
1.3 pounds won't provide a measurable improvement on flat ground, and assuming you're at a healthy 140 pound climbing weight will only make you 0.8% faster up the steepest climbs which is about 30 seconds an hour.
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