Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Breaking spokes, what to do?

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Breaking spokes, what to do?

Old 12-31-17, 08:01 PM
  #1  
jontg428
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Breaking spokes, what to do?

Was out riding my CAAD12 today and broke a second spoke. The bike has the Maddux 2.0 rims on it, and I weigh 250lbs. Am I too heavy for these spokes to handle? I am going to take it into my local shop that is highly regarded and see what they have to say. I am hoping the spokes are just over tightened and under too much stress.
jontg428 is offline  
Old 12-31-17, 08:42 PM
  #2  
ReneV
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 201

Bikes: FM098-V2, '16 Synapse

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 81 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Having ridden specced wheels at 250lbs, my recommendation is to not throw money at what you've got but move straight to a class of wheels whose price is likely to make you uncomfortable, for an overall better and cheaper experience.

To give an indication of price point, I'm quite happy with Shimano's Ultegra and RS81 wheels for most purposes but I don't think there's anything particularly unique about them. DT Swiss wheels have also been good to me.

Avoid boutique wheels like the plague, of course;-)

Last edited by ReneV; 12-31-17 at 08:45 PM.
ReneV is offline  
Old 12-31-17, 09:00 PM
  #3  
Steve B.
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South shore, L.I., NY
Posts: 4,773

Bikes: Flyxii FR322, Cannondale Topstone, Miyata City Liner, Specialized Chisel

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1816 Post(s)
Liked 532 Times in 351 Posts
These look like OEM wheels, probably machine built, 24 spoke ?, according to what I see in a Google.

If that’s the case, you’ve a few things working against you, 1) Machine built, so probably not stressed, thus the stress and break in comes as you ride it. Hard to know this, but probably a good thing is to ride a hundred miles, then take to a shop who can then re-true the wheel. Nobody does that on a new bike though, ‘cause they dont know to. 2) If it’s the 24 spoke wheels I see online, that’s way too few spokes for your weight (I’m the same as BTW), and you likely need a new wheel, 32 or better 36 spokes, double butted, hand built and stressed. I’ve a pair of these (32’s) from Bicycle Wheel Warehouse, they’ve gone 2500 miles with 2 touch ups. About $350 for 105 hub, Open Pro, 36 DT DB spokes. You can also just price out a beefier rear wheel, as that’s typically where most problems occur, thus keep using the front

Obviously see what the shop where you bought the bike tells you. Typically and if a warranty, they fix or replace, but usually you just end up delaying the real solution which is better wheels
Steve B. is offline  
Old 12-31-17, 11:03 PM
  #4  
jontg428
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I kind of had a feeling an upgrade may be needed. The shop near me (Robinson's Wheel Works) is reputable, and I am going to see what they say. I am hoping that maybe we can go with some stronger spokes and see how it goes. To answer Steve B, they are 28 spoke from what I found online. I really want a set of Mavic Cosmic carbon fibre pro SL C rims, but they just cost so much and my Christmas bonus is going towards bills and new tires for the wife's SUV. I may have to sell a few items of my model railroad off to fund some wheels lol.
jontg428 is offline  
Old 01-01-18, 12:16 AM
  #5  
jontg428
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Another thing I forgot to mention, my bike has disc brakes on it.
jontg428 is offline  
Old 01-01-18, 02:51 AM
  #6  
bikeme
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Sunny so. cal.
Posts: 837
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 43 Times in 21 Posts
If your rims are too flexy, stronger/heavier gauge spokes may still not fix your issue.
bikeme is offline  
Old 01-01-18, 03:25 AM
  #7  
clifftaylor
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 21
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Check the rider weight limits for the Mavic Cosmic carbon fibre pro SL C - Mavic give it as 120kg, so you'll be over their suggested max load - I'd suggest getting a wheelbuilder of repute to make you a pair of 32f / 36r on good rims, with good spokes; unless you're racing, go for something that will last!
Happy New Year

Edit - I had someone make me a pair of Excellight / Sapim X-ray / Novotech wheels (36/32) and they're great - the roads here in Derbyshire are pretty bad, and the wheels have stayed true for 2 years and counting.

Last edited by clifftaylor; 01-01-18 at 03:29 AM.
clifftaylor is offline  
Old 01-01-18, 04:43 AM
  #8  
dabac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 8,417
Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 988 Post(s)
Liked 173 Times in 131 Posts
Originally Posted by jontg428 View Post
Was out riding my CAAD12 today and broke a second spoke. The bike has the Maddux 2.0 rims on it, and I weigh 250lbs. Am I too heavy for these spokes to handle? .... I am hoping the spokes are just over tightened and under too much stress.
Originally Posted by jontg428 View Post
.... I am hoping that maybe we can go with some stronger spokes and see how it goes.
I suggest you read up a bit on failure modes on bike wheels before you go shopping.

Spokes generally fail from fatigue, and NOT from overload.
For the most common definition of ”stronger”, stronger spokes won’t fix it.
The usual recommendation for heavy riders breaking spokes is to go for spokes with better endurance/fatigue resistance.
This usually means a THINNER spoke, so ”weaker” WRT overload.
So to keep the overall characteristics of the wheel, usually more of them are needed.
At your weight, looking at a 24 spoke wheel isn’t the most sensible of options.
dabac is offline  
Old 01-01-18, 03:57 PM
  #9  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 22,213

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 130 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2436 Post(s)
Liked 944 Times in 606 Posts
Unless you're a seriously competitive rider, you're unlikely to suffer any performance problems by going to a higher spoke count as Steve B and dabac suggest above. A 32 or 36 spoke, hand built wheel is likely to be trouble-free at your weight.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 01-01-18, 08:44 PM
  #10  
rpenmanparker 
Senior Member
 
rpenmanparker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 28,682

Bikes: 1990 Romic Reynolds 531 custom build, Merlin Works CR Ti custom build, super light Workswell 066 custom build

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6554 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 32 Posts
Yes, more thinner gauge spoke is the right solution for you.
__________________
Robert

Originally Posted by LAJ View Post
No matter where I go, here I am...
rpenmanparker is offline  
Old 01-01-18, 10:02 PM
  #11  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 17,226

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2840 Post(s)
Liked 750 Times in 560 Posts
You're almost the weight of our tandem. We run 36H Kinlin XC279 rims with Sapim CXray spokes, from bikehubstore and built locally. You can ask them what they recommend for hubs. Inexpensive, fast, and bombproof. And they look cool.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 01-02-18, 11:40 AM
  #12  
Drew Eckhardt 
Senior Member
 
Drew Eckhardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Mountain View, CA USA and Golden, CO USA
Posts: 6,318

Bikes: 97 Litespeed, 50-39-30x13-26 10 cogs, Campagnolo Ultrashift, retroreflective rims on SON28/PowerTap hubs

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 537 Post(s)
Liked 294 Times in 208 Posts
Originally Posted by jontg428 View Post
Was out riding my CAAD12 today and broke a second spoke. The bike has the Maddux 2.0 rims on it, and I weigh 250lbs. Am I too heavy for these spokes to handle? I am going to take it into my local shop that is highly regarded and see what they have to say. I am hoping the spokes are just over tightened and under too much stress.
Replace the spokes in the failing group(s) (rear drive side heads-in, rear DS heads-out, etc.) and stress relieve them. Don't count on a shop to do more than replace the broken spokes which will have you making return visits until you give up on those wheels.

Spokes fail due to fatigue with the number of cycles depending on average stress (which is high in spokes which haven't been stress relieved because parts of the elbows were never taken past their elastic limit) and magnitude of the cycle (rider + bike weight) where the spokes unload passing the bottom of the rim.

Companies don't do that at the factory because warranty returns are less expensive than buying a Holland Mechanics stress relieving robot or paying for expensive hand labor.
Drew Eckhardt is offline  
Old 01-02-18, 11:45 AM
  #13  
Drew Eckhardt 
Senior Member
 
Drew Eckhardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Mountain View, CA USA and Golden, CO USA
Posts: 6,318

Bikes: 97 Litespeed, 50-39-30x13-26 10 cogs, Campagnolo Ultrashift, retroreflective rims on SON28/PowerTap hubs

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 537 Post(s)
Liked 294 Times in 208 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
You're almost the weight of our tandem. We run 36H Kinlin XC279 rims with Sapim CXray spokes, from bikehubstore and built locally. You can ask them what they recommend for hubs. Inexpensive, fast, and bombproof. And they look cool.
It's worth pointing out that CXRays are 2.0/1.5mm spokes and the thinnest in common use. Any decent quality spokes are sufficient for heavy riders, although bad builds don't tolerate heavy riders.

Fewer spokes work too, although heavier riders are often dissatisfied with the reduced lateral stiffness and below some count it becomes impossible to make a wheel ridable that breaks a spoke or gets slightly bent.
Drew Eckhardt is offline  
Old 01-02-18, 05:20 PM
  #14  
rpenmanparker 
Senior Member
 
rpenmanparker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 28,682

Bikes: 1990 Romic Reynolds 531 custom build, Merlin Works CR Ti custom build, super light Workswell 066 custom build

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6554 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 32 Posts
Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
It's worth pointing out that CXRays are 2.0/1.5mm spokes and the thinnest in common use. Any decent quality spokes are sufficient for heavy riders, although bad builds don't tolerate heavy riders.

Fewer spokes work too, although heavier riders are often dissatisfied with the reduced lateral stiffness and below some count it becomes impossible to make a wheel ridable that breaks a spoke or gets slightly bent.
Isn't there a "super spoke" that is thinner? Sapim. 1.8-1.4-1.8. I like the idea of the 1.4 center section, but I don't think the 1.8 mm ends are substantial enough to endure the constant flexing at those parts of the spoke.
__________________
Robert

Originally Posted by LAJ View Post
No matter where I go, here I am...
rpenmanparker is offline  
Old 01-02-18, 05:31 PM
  #15  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 21 Posts
This may sound contrary, but heavier riders often make out better using lighter spokes.

The reason is that at any given tension lighter spokes are stretched more, so they have more length to give up while staying under tension as the rim deflects.

If you came to me for wheels, I'd probably build the rear using 2.0/1.8/2.0 DB (or 2.3/1.8/2.0) spokes on the right, and 2.0/1.6/2.0 on the left. Or I might go heavier, using 2.3/2.0 on the right and 2.8/1.8/2.0 on the left. Note the left side has thinner sections in all the configurations to account for the lower tension that dish imposes.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 01-02-18, 07:20 PM
  #16  
pdoege
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 156
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Velocity makes a clydesdale set that you can buy off the shelf. They have worked well for me. I use them on the rear. I don't put enough weight on the fronts to need anything special.

Velocity Wheels - Hand Made in USA

In my experience a properly stress relieved "normal" wheel set will work fine for a bigger rider. However, once you start breaking spokes the game is up because the remaining spokes eat the stress and then break ad nauseam.
pdoege is offline  
Old 01-02-18, 08:23 PM
  #17  
joejack951
Senior Member
 
joejack951's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 12,029

Bikes: 2016 Hong Fu FM-079-F, 1984 Trek 660, 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1, 2016 Islabikes Beinn 20 (son's)

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1208 Post(s)
Liked 56 Times in 39 Posts
Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
It's worth pointing out that CXRays are 2.0/1.5mm spokes and the thinnest in common use.
CX-Rays are just 'squashed' Lasers, which are basically identical to DT Revolutions. Lasers and Revolutions are both 2.0/1.5/2.0 spokes, too.
joejack951 is offline  
Old 01-02-18, 08:27 PM
  #18  
joejack951
Senior Member
 
joejack951's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 12,029

Bikes: 2016 Hong Fu FM-079-F, 1984 Trek 660, 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1, 2016 Islabikes Beinn 20 (son's)

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1208 Post(s)
Liked 56 Times in 39 Posts
Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
Isn't there a "super spoke" that is thinner? Sapim. 1.8-1.4-1.8. I like the idea of the 1.4 center section, but I don't think the 1.8 mm ends are substantial enough to endure the constant flexing at those parts of the spoke.
Isn't the point of stress-relieving a wheel to avoid the 'constant flexing' at the j-bend? If downhillers can use CX-Rays, I see no reason why a normal weight road cyclist won't be fine on Super Spokes (as seen here: Super Spokes | Sapim).
joejack951 is offline  
Old 01-02-18, 08:43 PM
  #19  
Drew Eckhardt 
Senior Member
 
Drew Eckhardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Mountain View, CA USA and Golden, CO USA
Posts: 6,318

Bikes: 97 Litespeed, 50-39-30x13-26 10 cogs, Campagnolo Ultrashift, retroreflective rims on SON28/PowerTap hubs

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 537 Post(s)
Liked 294 Times in 208 Posts
Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
CX-Rays are just 'squashed' Lasers, which are basically identical to DT Revolutions. Lasers and Revolutions are both 2.0/1.5/2.0 spokes, too.
Exactly. All are the thinnest spokes in common use, with Sapim's 1.8/1.4mm round spokes the absolute smallest currently available.

My point is that 2.0/1.5mm are sufficient for heavy riders like the 250 pound OP, and every other common spoke size is heavier with a greater safety margin.

The OP's materials are fine, and problems entirely a build quality issue which is omnipresent in the bike industry because the warranty returns cost less than fixing it.
Drew Eckhardt is offline  
Old 01-02-18, 08:43 PM
  #20  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
Isn't the point of stress-relieving a wheel to avoid the 'constant flexing' at the j-bend? ......
Stress relieving has nothing to do with magically reducing flex.

Stress relief resets the "0" position.

When you build and tighten a wheel, the elbows take a set. However steel always has spring back, so if you want to bend a piece of steel to make a 90° angle, you have to bend it more than 90° so it springs back to 90° and stays there.

When you build and tighten a wheel and the elbows get set, they end up in the condition of not having sprung back and relaxed at that angle. That means that all new added stresses from flex aren't loaded onto a relaxed piece of steel, but added to the internal stress remaining from the initial set.

This is important, because the fatigue process in steel relates to being repeatedly brought near the yield point. If the steel starts out with residual stress, it ends up operating much closer to that limit before anything is added.

By analogy, imagine asking your friend to help you move some heavy furniture. Now imagine asking for the same favor, but putting a 30# weight belt on him first.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

Last edited by FBinNY; 01-02-18 at 09:00 PM.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 01-02-18, 09:21 PM
  #21  
joejack951
Senior Member
 
joejack951's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 12,029

Bikes: 2016 Hong Fu FM-079-F, 1984 Trek 660, 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1, 2016 Islabikes Beinn 20 (son's)

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1208 Post(s)
Liked 56 Times in 39 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
Stress relieving has nothing to do with magically reducing flex.

Stress relief resets the "0" position.

When you build and tighten a wheel, the elbows take a set. However steel always has spring back, so if you want to bend a piece of steel to make a 90° angle, you have to bend it more than 90° so it springs back to 90° and stays there.

When you build and tighten a wheel and the elbows get set, they end up in the condition of not having sprung back and relaxed at that angle. That means that all new added stresses from flex aren't loaded onto a relaxed piece of steel, but added to the internal stress remaining from the initial set.

This is important, because the fatigue process in steel relates to being repeatedly brought near the yield point. If the steel starts out with residual stress, it ends up operating much closer to that limit before anything is added.

By analogy, imagine asking your friend to help you move some heavy furniture. Now imagine asking for the same favor, but putting a 30# weight belt on him first.
Thanks for the correction and clear explanation. It is obvious when I stop think about it, something I did not do before posting in my current stomach-bug recovering state.
joejack951 is offline  
Old 01-02-18, 10:27 PM
  #22  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 17,226

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2840 Post(s)
Liked 750 Times in 560 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
This may sound contrary, but heavier riders often make out better using lighter spokes.

The reason is that at any given tension lighter spokes are stretched more, so they have more length to give up while staying under tension as the rim deflects.

If you came to me for wheels, I'd probably build the rear using 2.0/1.8/2.0 DB (or 2.3/1.8/2.0) spokes on the right, and 2.0/1.6/2.0 on the left. Or I might go heavier, using 2.3/2.0 on the right and 2.8/1.8/2.0 on the left. Note the left side has thinner sections in all the configurations to account for the lower tension that dish imposes.
The bolded part, plus the aero part, plus the appearance part describe the reasons I used the CXrays. After many thousands of miles and several rim changes due to wear, the original spokes are still doing fine. I did have one break, but that spoke had helped to slice another rider's rear blinkie into neat sections during a paceline incident. So no blame on the spoke. So far, we have not had a squirrel incident.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 01-02-18, 10:54 PM
  #23  
dabac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 8,417
Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 988 Post(s)
Liked 173 Times in 131 Posts
Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
... If downhillers can use CX-Rays....
DH bikes tend not to see much mileage.
And the wheels often end up retired due to rim damage from impact before spoke fatigue becomes an issue.
dabac is offline  
Old 01-06-18, 12:29 PM
  #24  
jontg428
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Wow, I have not read this thread in a while, so thank you for all your input. I took the wheel over to a very reputable shop and he went over it with his tension gauge. As he suspected, the tension was not consistent around the rim since it was machine built. The wheel itself he said was decent as was the hub (though he said it could be better.) The wheel is going to be rebuilt with some DT Swiss competition spokes with proper tension which will resolve the issue. Basically since the spoke tension was inconsistent from the get go I had spoke breaking issues. I asked him about going to a 36 spoke wheel and he said it was not necessary. He is heavier than I am and rides 32 spoke wheels without an issue, the key is having them built properly and with good components. We will see how it goes, right now I am missing my bike, looking forward to getting back on the road. Thanks again for all your responses,
Jon
jontg428 is offline  
Old 01-07-18, 03:42 PM
  #25  
f4rrest
Farmer tan
 
f4rrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Burbank, CA
Posts: 7,986

Bikes: Allez, SuperSix Evo

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2870 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by jontg428 View Post
Wow, I have not read this thread in a while, so thank you for all your input. I took the wheel over to a very reputable shop and he went over it with his tension gauge. As he suspected, the tension was not consistent around the rim since it was machine built. The wheel itself he said was decent as was the hub (though he said it could be better.) The wheel is going to be rebuilt with some DT Swiss competition spokes with proper tension which will resolve the issue. Basically since the spoke tension was inconsistent from the get go I had spoke breaking issues. I asked him about going to a 36 spoke wheel and he said it was not necessary. He is heavier than I am and rides 32 spoke wheels without an issue, the key is having them built properly and with good components. We will see how it goes, right now I am missing my bike, looking forward to getting back on the road. Thanks again for all your responses,
Jon
If the rebuild works out, it's good to have a backup set of wheels anyhow, so you don't have to endure time off the bike.
f4rrest is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.